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KDE and openSUSE: Plasma 5.14, Qt 5.12 and more

October 17th, 2018 by

Plasma 5.14

Plasma 5.14 was released with many improvements.

It was planned to have it in a released in a Tumbleweed snapshot on the same day, but openQA issues prevented snapshot 20181008 from getting published. Instead, Tumbleweed users got it with snapshot 20181009 on Thursday morning. Currently, 5.14.1 is staged to be accepted in Tumbleweed.

To get it on Leap 15 (and even 42.3 with restrictions), you can add https://en.opensuse.org/SDB:KDE_repositories#KDE_Frameworks_5.2C_Plasma_5_and_Applications. Note that those are not part of the official distribution and therefore not as well supported.

KDE:Unstable drops support for Leap 42.3

The KDE:Unstable projects will drop support for openSUSE 42.3 next week.

Builds of KDE software from git master have been available for Leap 15 even before the official release, which should’ve given everyone enough time to migrate.

The Argon media got switched to Leap 15 just after release as well. If you haven’t heard of Argon (and Krypton) yet, they’re installable live media with the latest version of KDE software on Leap and Tumbleweed.

See the wiki article (https://en.opensuse.org/SDB:Argon_and_Krypton) for more information.

Migrating to Leap 15 also means that less system libraries (like libinput) need to be replaced, as the version in Leap 15 is sufficient for now.

If you haven’t migrated to Leap 15 yet, read https://en.opensuse.org/SDB:System_upgrade#Command_line_2. The provided instructions work just fine for the KDE:Unstable repositories.

Goodbye to Webkit (from a default install)

Did you know that two major browsers, Safari and Chromium, are based on KDE software? That’s right, KHTML was used by Apple as foundation when creating the WebKit Browser engine. During the development of Chrome, Google forked WebKit into Blink. (more…)

Tumbleweed Gets Python Setuptools 40.0, New Versions of Frameworks, Applications

July 26th, 2018 by

Several packages were updated in openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots this week and developers will notice the snapshots are reported to be extremely stable.

Wireshark, sysdig, GNOME’s evolution, KDE’s Frameworks and Applications, Ceph, vim and python-setuptools were just a few of the many packages that arrived in Tumbleweed this week.

Wireshark 2.6.2 received several Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) updates in snapshot 20180723, which included a HTTP2 dissector crash. The sysdig tool for deep system visibility with native support for containers had a minor update to 0.22.0 and added support for addional custom container types alongside Docker. Configurable text editor vim was updated to version 8.1.0200 and poppler 0.66.0 fixed compilations with some strict compilers when rendering PDFs. Google’s RE2 package, which is fast, safe, thread-friendly alternative to backtracking regular expression engines like those used in PCRE, Perl, and Python, simplified the spec file and fixed a Deterministic Finite Automaton (DFA) out of memory error. Cups-filters 1.20.4 made some ipp and ipps changes and also removed support for hardware-implemented reversing of page order in PostScript printers for some rare printers. (more…)

New Python3, LibreOffice, Google RE2 Packages Released in Tumbleweed

January 11th, 2018 by

Several openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots arrive before and after the new year and this post will focus on the most recent snapshots released this week.

Much of the efforts of developers this week have focused on patching the Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities. openSUSE’s rolling distribution produced four openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots so far this week.

While the Long-Term Support 4.4 Linux Kernel has patched many of the vulnerabilities associated with Meltdown and Spectre, the 4.14.12 Linux Kernel released in snapshot 20180107  hasn’t, but Tumbleweed users will likely see the vulnerabilities patched soon.

The most recent snapshot 20180109, which was released within the past hour, brought KDE Frameworks 5.41.0, which brought 70 addon libraries to Qt. A major version was released for LibreOffice as the libreoffice 6.0.0.1 package had many fixes in gpg4libre and new features for Writer, Calc and Draw. Poppler 0.62.0 was also included in the snapshot and removed Qt4 poppler package following upstream change

Newer packages that arrived in the 20180107 snapshot were Chat Client irssi 1.0.6, which fixed some random memory bugs, and the llvm 5.0.1, which delete intermediate files during build to reduce total disk usage. And kcm_sddm 5.11.5 was a bug fix release.

(more…)

Tumbleweed Snapshots Update Fonts, Perl, Python Packages

April 27th, 2017 by

openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots this week gave many newer versions of Perl and Python packages, but several other packages were updated in the repositories including some open fonts.

Google and Adobe fonts were updated in snapshots 20170424 and 20170420 with google-croscore-fonts and adobe-sourcehansans-fonts being added to the repositories respectively.

Besides the google-croscore-fonts in snapshots 20170424, users can get a fix for the CD/DVD burning software Brasero, which provided a patch for Grub2 that fixes builds with the GNU Composite Compilers, and kdebase4-workspace offers a diff to fix an error reported by GCC7, which should be helpful as Tumbleweed works closer to adapt the newest GCC. The snapshot also delivered a patch for VirtualBox that will provide an eventual Application Programming Interface change for the release of Leap 42.3. (more…)

Google Summer of Code Update – Looking for Students

March 26th, 2008 by

The openSUSE Project is looking for students who are interested in contributing to the project via the Google Summer of Code. The application deadline for students is Monday, March 31st at 5 p.m. Pacific Daylight Time. (00:00 UTC, April 1, 2008)

If you’re not sure whether you’re qualified to join as a student, check the SoC FAQ — it spells out the eligibility very well.

After all students have submitted applications, the mentoring organization (in this case, the openSUSE project) will review and rank the proposals.

Mentors must be signed up by April 11, and students must be matched with mentors.

The entire timeline is available on the Google Summer of Code site.

The openSUSE Project’s ideas page is available on the openSUSE wiki. As you can see, we have a ton of good ideas. We’re open to more, though, so feel free to add one if it’s something you’re particularly interested in working on.

If you have any questions about the Summer of Code program, please contact Joe ‘Zonker’ Brockmeier or Christoph Thiel.