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openSUSE Develops Legal Review System

November 8th, 2018 by

The open-source community has a new project designed to help Linux/GNU distributions with the legal review process of licenses.

The new project called Cavil is legal review system that is collectively beneficial not only for the  openSUSE Project, but distributions and projects that want to use it.

The project provides an add-on service for the Open Build Service.

Every OBS request for openSUSE Factory goes through a legal review process to ensure licenses are compatible. Cavil indexes these and creates a legal report for every single request. Bot comments in OBS are made through the legal-auto python script, but the entire project is much larger than the script and bots.

Sebastian Riedel and Stephan Kulow have been developing the project for two years and it has been used in production for more than a year and half. The Cavil legal review system replaces an older system and provides much more efficiency. Cavil can automatically accept more than 90 percent of all new requests based on data from previous reviews, so packages are much more streamlined into openSUSE Factory.

The project has been so efficient that two lawyers who do all the legal reviews with the system, which is also used by SUSE, had reviewed about 110,000 packages this past year. The same lawyers curated a library with 27.000 license patterns for 600 licenses and 20 license patterns for 100 of the  most common licenses that are used to create legal reports. Riedel said there is a desire hope to expand that in the future with the hope of collecting new patterns with the open-source community.

The legal Data Base used by SUSE to generate reports with new license patterns  is about 2TB and has about 68.433.436 pattern matches in 27.319.682 individual files.

Like openQA, Cavil is written in Perl, with Mojolicious/Minion and PostgreSQL.

A quick look at the statistics about the content of the legal database showed the most popular open source licenses were GPL-2.0, BSD-3-Clause, GPL-Unspecified and MIT respectively.

Marvell, TUXEDO Computers Sponsor openSUSE Project

November 6th, 2018 by

Two companies were recently added to the openSUSE Sponsors page thanks to the companies generous donations to the openSUSE Project.

Both Marvell and TUXEDO Computers have provided tangible support through donations to openSUSE to promote the use and development of Linux.

“We are thoroughly pleased to have Marvell and TUXEDO Computers as sponsors of the openSUSE Project,” said Richard Brown, chairman of the openSUSE Board. “The sponsorships support and encourage open-software development. Multiple Linux distributions and the open-source community will benefit greatly from the equipment.”

Marvell, which recently completed the acquisition of Cavium, offers a broad portfolio of infrastructure solutions. Marvell donated a ThunderX2 system to the openSUSE Project. The Dual-System-on-Chip machine with 256GB RAM and 240GB SSD will extend the existing fleet of ARM build hardware. This 64-bit ThunderX2 system will bring an additional 40 ARMv8 (AArch64) concurrent build jobs to the openSUSE Open Build Service, which can now provide its users with faster AArch64 package and installation image builds.

TUXEDO Computers makes Linux hardware, notebooks and more. The company, which offers its TUXEDO InfinityBook Pro 13 with Leap 15 preinstalled, has offered to send volunteers running openSUSE booths at conferences a TUXEDO laptop for demo purposes, which will need to be returned to TUXEDO Computers after demoing it at a conference. Volunteers who wish to demo a TUXEDO laptop at a summit, conference or other open-source technology event can request a demo laptop through a trusted person in the openSUSE. The trusted person will decide on eligibility of the volunteer on behalf of TUXEDO Computers. Contact the openSUSE Board or an openSUSE member if you are interested. TUXEDO Computers will send out the laptop and handle return shipping.

openSUSE Kubic Moves in a New Direction

August 9th, 2018 by

Dear Community,

It has been more than a year since the openSUSE community started the Kubic Project, and it’s worth looking back over the last months and evaluating where we’ve succeeded, where we haven’t, and share with you all our plans for the future.

A stable base for the future

Much of our success has been in the area generally referred to as **MicroOS**, the part of the Kubic stack that provides a stable operating system that is **atomicly updated** for running containers.

Not only is Kubic MicroOS now a fully integrated part of the openSUSE Tumbleweed release process, but our Transactional Update stack has also been ported to regular openSUSE Tumbleweed and Leap.

Based on the community’s feedback, the new System Role has been further refined and now includes fully automated updates out of the box.

This collaboration is continuing, with many minor changes to the regular openSUSE installation process coming soon based on lessons learned with tuning the installation process in Kubic.

Reviewing our initial premise

We haven’t just been busy on the basesystem. Our efforts with Rootless Containers continue, and you can now use the “Docker-alternative” Podman CRI-O in both Kubic and regular openSUSE. But when considering the Initial Premise of the Kubic project, it’s probably safe to say we’re not where we hoped to be by now.

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cPanel Provides Project with Network Cards

January 18th, 2018 by

The hosting platform cPanel has provided the openSUSE Project with two new network cards to assist the project with its infrastructure needs.

The network cards will soon be integrated into the openSUSE infrastructure to improve the Open Build Service.

“On behalf of the openSUSE Project and the many developers and packagers who use OBS to develop open-source software, we thank cPanel for their generosity,” said Richard Brown, openSUSE Chairman. “This contribution not only helps the openSUSE project but will help other open-source projects as well.”

OBS is a generic system to build and distribute binary packages from sources in an automatic, consistent and reproducible way. It can release packages as well as updates, add-ons, appliances and entire distributions for a wide range of operating systems and hardware architectures.

“We use an internal installation of the Open Build Service, and also help customers and third parties use the public OBS at build.opensuse.org,” said Ken Power, Vice President of Product Development at cPanel. “Supporting the open source projects that we use is incredibly important to us, and we’re glad to be able to help here.”

The network cards will be used to improve the backend of OBS.

“The cards will be used to connect the OBS backend storage and network; bringing it from a 1GB to 10BG and improving the backend performance,” said Thorsent Bro, a member of the openSUSE Heroes team. “We want to thank cPanel for its generous support and giving back to the projects that help with Linux/GNU development.”

SUSE Studio online + Open Build Service = SUSE Studio Express

October 4th, 2017 by

Merging SUSE Studio and Open Build Service

Written by Andreas Jaeger

SUSE Studio was launched in 2009 to make building images really easy. Nowadays, images are used everywhere – for public cloud you need images; container images are used to have small and movable workloads, and data center operators use golden images to start their workloads.

As you may be aware, we have an Open Build Service (OBS) tool that helps you to build packages to deliver complete distributions. In the last few years, we have been updating this tool and it now can handle any kind of image.

Additionally, the default engine for building images at SUSE is kiwi and is used in both SUSE Studio and OBS.

Reviewing these offerings and the way the image build situation has evolved, we have decided to merge the two online services, OBS and SUSE Studio, into a common solution.

Looking at the feature requests for SUSE Studio on image building and looking at our technologies, we decided to use OBS as the base for our image building service. Since OBS already builds images for various environments, we will first add a new image building GUI to OBS. This combined solution will now be delivered as “SUSE Studio Express”.

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OBS got the power!

February 25th, 2017 by

Old build workers, rack mounted

One year after introducing a new kind of Open Build Service worker machines, the “lambkins”, the openSUSE Build Service got a big hardware refresh. The new machines, sponsored by SUSE, are equipped with:

– 2,8GHz AMD Opteron Processors (6348)

– 256 GB RAM

– one 120 GB SSD

Four of them are located in a chassis with a height of 2 units and run 12-16 workers on them (virtual machines, that are building packages).

That new build power allowed us to remove some of old machines from the pool. The unified hardware makes the management of the machines a lot easier now, even if there are still the most powerful old machines left.

For those who like some more pictures, feel free to check the rest of the entry… (more…)

Tumbleweed gets three snapshots, Leap deadline approaches

August 10th, 2016 by

Tumbleweed-black-greenSince the release of Linux Kernel 4.7 in the 20160730 snapshot, which brought lengthy email discussions about out-of-tree and third-party drivers on the Factory mailing list, openSUSE Tumbleweed produced three snapshots.

Snapshot 20160803 made a small update to the repositories for Mozilla Thunderbird and k3b. The snapshot updated libzypp to version 16.2.1, gnome-online-accounts to 3.20.3 and obs-service-source_validator. In 20160803, virt-viewer had the most changes.

Snapshot 20160805 brought more package changes and one major uninstall. LXDM was dropped from openSUSE Tumbleweed and uninstalled in this snapshot. LightDM is being used in the environment instead and is auto-installed with a change configuration for those who are using LXDM. This snapshot provided several repository updates, and NetworkManager-gnome, Libreoffice 5.2.0.4 and WireShark 2.0.5 were a few of the many changes found is 20160805.

The most recent snapshot, 20160806, updated Inkscape, which provides more extensions. Wayland-protocols updated to a new upstream release of 1.5 and btrfsprogs has new options to run in the background with version 4.7.

Tumbleweed users will likely get Plasma 5.72 in the next snapshot, which should be released soon.

openSUSE Leap

In two weeks is the submission deadline to get packages in the next version of openSUSE Leap 42.2. The Beta 1 is scheduled for release at the end of this month, according to the roadmap.

The current development version, Alpha 3, needs more people to test the version and file bugs. Download Alpha 3 and test it out at software.opensuse.org.

OBS welcomes new lambkins

January 27th, 2016 by

The openSUSE build service becomes more and more a victim of his success: building constantly more than 300,000 packages for more than 43,000 developers needs really a lot of build power! And build power means not only CPU! It includes everything that you can expect from an IT infrastructure:

Old hard-drives from OBS-workers

Old hard-drives from OBS-workers

  • CPU power
  • RAM (the more, the better)
  • Storage (temporary local, on the clients and also to store and distribute the results)
  • Network
  • electic power (and cooling, and maintenance, and manpower to maintain the hardware, …)

Thankfully our main sponsor SUSE allowed us now to buy some new hardware to replace some of the old machines that build software packages for over ten different distributions all day long.

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openSUSE Build Service 1.0 Released

July 9th, 2008 by

The openSUSE Project is proud to announce the 1.0 release of the openSUSE Build Service. The 1.0 release provides all the features necessary to support building openSUSE in the public build systems and allowing direct contributions to openSUSE from all contributors. Developers can now submit contributions to openSUSE directly at build.opensuse.org.

The openSUSE Build Service allows developers to create and maintain packages for openSUSE and many other Linux distributions, including CentOS, Debian, Fedora, Mandriva, Red Hat, and Ubuntu. With the 1.0 release, the openSUSE Build Service expands its scope to building the entire openSUSE release, and provides everyone with the same access and transparent interface to work on the openSUSE distribution.

The openSUSE Build Service has offered a simple collaboration system since its inception for groups to work closely together on packages or solutions stacks. The 1.0 release improves on existing functionality to allow the Build Service to scale to larger projects like openSUSE’s Factory distribution, and to allow building openSUSE’s stable releases in the open.

What the changes mean for contributors:

  • Anyone can find a package’s working copy as maintained by the official packager or packaging team. Contributors can submit changes against the working copy.
  • The submission handling and notification system has been put in place, allowing any contributor to request a merge of their changes to a project.
  • Quality assurance happens before contributions are merged. Test builds of a suggested change are accessible to anyone.
  • Improved branch handling. It is easy to set up a branch of a package. The branch will build in the same way as the original package, but can be modified.
  • Source handling is improved in 1.0. It’s now possible to easily maintain a branch, and modifications are stored without creating a full copy. This makes it easier to maintain features based on the latest copy of package. The Build Service builds the latest packages, including modifications, automatically.

The majority of this functionality is implemented on the server side. The rest can be implemented by the various Build Service clients, so that contributors can take advantage of the new features.

The Build Service team has also introduced a number of smaller improvements and bugfixes to make the system more scalable and usable.

The openSUSE Build Service is now considered “feature complete” for collaboration. The Build Service team is looking for additional feedback on improving the openSUSE Build Service as it will now be the standard tool for working on the distribution.

openSUSE Build Service 1.0 RC 1 released

June 11th, 2008 by

The openSUSE Project has released the first release candidate of the openSUSE Build Service 1.0. With the release candidate, all the features are now in place to support external collaboration with the community to build openSUSE in the open. Developers can now submit contributions to openSUSE directly at build.opensuse.org.

The openSUSE Build Service has offered a simple collaboration system since its inception for groups to work closely together on packages or solutions stacks. The 1.0 RC 1 release improves on existing functionality to allow the Build Service to scale to larger projects like openSUSE’s Factory distribution.

What the changes mean for contributors:

  • Anyone can find a package’s working copy as maintained by the official packager or packaging team. Contributors can submit changes against the working copy.
  • The submission handling and notification system has been put in place, allowing any contributor to request a merge of their changes to a project.
  • Quality assurance happens before contributions are merged. Test builds of a suggested change are accessible to anyone.
  • Improved branch handling. It is easy to set up a branch of a package. The branch will build in the same way as the original package, but can be modified.
  • Source handling is improved in 1.0. It’s now possible to easily maintain a branch, and modifications are stored without creating a full copy. This makes it easier to maintain features based on the latest copy of package. The Build Service builds the latest packages, including modifications, automatically.

The majority of this functionality is implemented on the server side. The rest can be implemented by the various Build Service clients, so that contributors can take advantage of the new features.

The Build Service team has also introduced a number of smaller improvements and bugfixes to make the system more scalable and usable.

The openSUSE Build Service is now considered “feature complete” for collaboration, but the team is expecting a lot of user feedback since this now is our standard tool for working on the distribution. We will be releasing frequent updates to improve the Build Service based on this feedback. Contributors can discuss the build service on the mailing list and on Freenode in the #opensuse-buildservice channel.