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Have a Release Party, Promote openSUSE’s Newest Version

May 16th, 2018 by

There are just 9 days left for the release of openSUSE Leap 15 and the community can help spread the word of the release by having a release party and promoting the newest version of Leap.

Thanks to hellcp people can decorate their blogs and website with the openSUSE Leap 15 counter:

      

A list of social media posts are listed on the wiki and members of the community are encouraged to translate and post the translated posts in their local language on social media.

Many members of the community will be at the openSUSE Conference for the release/after party but the parties can continue with your own Release Party. If you don’t know how to do this, there is a list of five steps to have a successful release party. Plus more details are listed below on how to have a fantastic party.

Selecting a good date and having some goodies to pass out to the party requires a bit of planning. The checklist below can help with planning the release party. If you plan on having a party, email ddemaio (at) opensuse.org well before the party to get some goodies to hand out to the party people. Please include “Leap 15 Party” in the subject line and include a mailing address and phone number.

Notify the community of your release party by listing your party on the launch party wiki page.

checklist:

Find a date

The date of a party is best during a weekend (because it’s easier for people to join, since most people work during the week), but we all function differently. Find two alternative dates for the party if you want and use http://www.doodle.com/ to find a common date that works for most people.

Find a place

A cafe, bar or Linux group meetup location are all great places to have an event. A coffee and cake release party is just as fun as a beer and pizza release party.

Cake

It is not necessary to have a cake, but it sure is a lot of fun. You can also have openSUSE Cookies. On the Launch Party wiki page, there are two Release Parties list so far. One release party is in Nuremberg, Germany, on August 3 starting at 4 p.m. The other party is listed for FrOSCon and both will have a cake.

Pictures, pictures, pictures

Bring one or more cameras to take pictures or videos and post them to social media. Tag openSUSE on the photos you post on Twitter, Google +, Facebook or Diaspora.

Swag

PromoDVDs, webcam covers and stickers – If we can get it to you without too much red tape from governments, we will; just email ddemaio (at) opensuse.org with Release Party.

IMPORTANT TIP: Schedule your release party on the wiki and have a lot of fun!

Transactional Updates in openSUSE Leap 15

May 15th, 2018 by

This blog is part of a series of technical blogs leading up to the release of openSUSE Leap 15. All of the blogs provide a use case regarding openSUSE Leap and the packages available in the distribution. Happy reading.

Transactional Updates is one of the exciting new features available in the upcoming release of openSUSE Leap 15, which is scheduled to be officially released May 25.

Contributed by the Kubic Project, Transactional Updates provides openSUSE systems with a method of updating the operating system and its packages in an entirely ‘atomic’ way. Updates are either applied to the system all together in a single transaction, or not at all. This happens without influencing the running system. If an update fails, or if the successful update is deemed to be incompatible or otherwise incorrect, it can be discarded to immediately return the system to its previous functioning state.

This differs from existing alternatives that already exist in the open source world. Some users use a rather exorbitant approach of maintaining multiple versions of their system in multiple partitions on disk to switch between the partitions to address a fear of tampering with a perfectly running system.

This juggling approach works, but takes an exorbitant amount of disk storage and maintenance efforts. More modern approaches like using ostree and snap attempt to address these problems and bring atomic/transactional updates to their users. However, these solutions have unintended consequence as users, developers, and partnering software vendors all learn new ways of managing their systems and existing packages cannot be re-used, which require either repackging or conversion. All of this develops to a situation where adopters need to redesign their mindsets, systems, tools and company policies to work with these clever tools. These workarounds have some key flaws that Kubic’s Transactional Updates feature strives to avoid.

Under the hood, Transactional Updates are made simple. Utilising the same btrfs, snapper, and zypper technologies that are trusted defaults in openSUSE Leap, Transactional Updates do something very similar to the traditional snapshots and rollbacks in Leap. However, Transactional Updates it never touches the running system. Instead of patching the current system, the transactional-update tool creates a new snapshot. All of the operations required by the update are carried out into a snapshot that ensures the current system is untouched with no changes impacting the running system.

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Hands on with Docker, openSUSE Leap 15

May 4th, 2018 by

This blog is part of a series of technical blogs leading up to the release of openSUSE Leap 15. All of the blogs provide a use case regarding openSUSE Leap and the packages available in the distribution. Happy reading.

Authored by Max Huang

Docker is a software technology providing containers, promoted by the company Docker, Inc. Docker provides an additional layer of abstraction and automation of operating-system-level virtualization on Windows and Linux.

Docker implements a high-level Application Programming Interface to provide lightweight containers that run processes in isolation.

Because Docker containers are so lightweight, a single server or virtual machine can run several containers simultaneously.

Let’s do some hands on with Docker and openSUSE Leap 15.

== Install Docker  ==

Use GUI method

use yast2  sw_single install docker

# yast2  sw_single

Search  docker

Select docker to install

 

Use command line to install docker

use zypper to install, if you don’t want interactive use #zypper  -n install docker

# zypper  install  docker

Loading repository data…

Reading installed packages…

Resolving package dependencies…

The following 13 NEW packages are going to be installed:

 containerd criu docker docker-bash-completion docker-libnetwork docker-runc git-core git-gui gitk libnet9

 libsha1detectcoll1 python2-ipaddr python2-protobuf

The following recommended package was automatically selected:

 criu

13 new packages to install.

Overall download size: 23.2 MiB. Already cached: 0 B. After the operation, additional 117.1 MiB will be used.

Continue? [y/n/…? shows all options] (y):  Y

Check docker version when you install it

# docker  –version

Docker version 17.09.1-ce, build f4ffd2511ce9

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openSUSE Leap 15 Release Scheduled for May 25

April 18th, 2018 by

The release of openSUSE Leap 15 is scheduled to be release during the first day of this year’s openSUSE Conference in Prague, Czech Republic on May 25.

The package submission deadline for non-bug fix package updates is April 24 as Leap enters the release candidate phase. The scheduled release for Leap 15 is May 25 at 12:00 UTC.

Leap has been using a rolling development model for building Leap 15 beta versions. Bug fixes and new packages have been released via snapshots to users testing the beta versions. The snapshots for the test version will stop and maintenance and security updates for Leap 15’s release will begin next month. Linux professionals and anyone looking to use Leap 15 are encouraged to test the beta versions as there is still snapshots being released and announced on the openSUSE Factory Mailing List. A list of items to test is available here.

The openSUSE project is pleased to announce that with Leap 15 Live images will again be available. Both KDE and GNOME can be tested without having to change your current system.

openSUSE Leap 15 shares a common core with SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 15 sources and has thousands of community packages on top to meet the needs of professional and semi-professional users and their workloads.

The Kubic Project contributed a system role selection available with the release that offers two types of server roles; the classic server role and a Transactional Server role, which uses transactional updates and a Read-Only Root Filesystem. The release at the openSUSE Conference will give the openSUSE community and Free Open Source Software projects an opportunity to discuss plans for the openSUSE Leap 15 release, which will receive maintenance updates for at least three years.

What Is New With KDE’s Plasma 5.12 in openSUSE Leap

February 23rd, 2018 by


KDE Plasma 5.8 users coming from openSUSE Leap 42.3 to Plasma 5.12 on Leap 15 will notice significant changes when upgrading to the new versions.

The boot up time for KDE’s new Long Term Support release is faster and there is more optimization.

There have been performance optimizations all over the KDE desktop. The file operations in Dolphin are much faster now than with older KDE Frameworks releases. Plasma 5.12 has lower memory requirements and there are several new features users will notice from Leap 42.3 and Plasma 5.8.

The notification system gained support for interactive previews, which allows users to quickly take screenshots and drag them into a chat window, an email composer or a web browser; that makes it convenient for the user to not have to leave an application that is being used.

Music lovers will enjoy the new Music Controls in the Lock Screen. The new Media Controls include Previous and Next track. Play and pause are also included and it shows the song title that is playing. The lock screen controls can be disabled for added privacy.

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Plasma 5.12 Brings Wayland to Leap

February 8th, 2018 by

This Tuesday KDE released the latest Long Term Support (LTS) version of the Plasma desktop 5.12.

A key point in this new release is that Wayland support was extensively worked on and is now suitable as part of the Long Term Support guarantees. In particular, the Plasma session in Wayland now plays nicer with multiple screens, and has added support for screen rotation and touchscreen calibration. It also gained a new exclusive feature, Night Color, which removes blue light from the screen at night time in a similar fashion to Redshift, which only works in X11.

This means that the upcoming openSUSE Leap 15 will offer a far more complete Wayland experience installed by default. It will just be a matter of selecting “Plasma (Wayland)” in the session list of the display manager before logging in. Nothing will change for Tumbleweed users, which had already a Wayland session available since Plasma 5.4.

The Wayland session has already been tested by openQA as part of the Tumbleweed release process as was mentioned in a previous news post, but now this is also done for live media. So, if you want to test Wayland without touching your existing installation, why not give the live media a try?

As always, have a lot of fun!