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Posts Tagged ‘Snapper’

Tumbleweed Snapshots Bring Users New Vulkan, 4.9.7 Kernel

February 9th, 2017 by

Six Tumbleweed snapshots this week brought users newer versions of GStreamer, Wine, Vulkan, and a new Linux Kernel.

The new 4.9.7 kernel arrived over the weekend with the 20170204 snapshot.

The new kernel sources updated config files and fixed a build failure specific to DWARF (Debugging with Attributed Records Format). The snapshot added support for the Perl client ddclient to version 3.8.3 and yast2-installation 3.2.20 added an all-in-one installation overview for SUSE’s new Container as a Service Platform product. More information about CaaSP and transactional updates can be found in a video presented by Thorsten Kukuk at FOSDEM.

GNU Compiler Collection 6.3.1 passed testing in openQA and made it into the 20170205 snapshot and so did python-cryptography 1.7.2 and getdata 0.10.0, which is a library that provides an Application Programming Interface (API) to interface with Dirfile databases.

The 20170206 snapshot gave users Wine 2.1, which provided fixes that were deferred during the code freeze and Direct2D rendering improvements. Mercurial 4.1 reduced server-side PCU usage with a new compression engine.

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Optimal Release for Linux Professionals Arrives with openSUSE Leap 42.2

November 16th, 2016 by

A Professional Distribution for Developers, System Administrators and Users

(Languages: CZ, DE, EN, ES, FR, IT, JA, LT, TW)

Members of the openSUSE Project are pleased to announce the release of the next minor version of Leap; openSUSE Leap 42.2! Leap is made to give stability-minded users and conservative technology adopters peace of mind. openSUSE Leap 42.2 is powered by the Linux 4.4 Long-Term-Support (LTS) kernel and is a secure, stable and reliable server operating system for deploying IT services in physical, virtual or cloud environments.

A selective process of including well-established packages in openSUSE Leap 42.2 gives new meaning to the term Linux Optimization; openSUSE Leap is simply the safe choice that offers Linux professionals a user-friendly desktop and a feature-rich server environment.

Leap-green.png

Continuing the tradition of using source code from SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE), openSUSE Leap 42.2 provides a level of stability unmatched by other Linux distributions. With community-built packages on top of Leap’s enterprise reliability, openSUSE Leap users benefit both from community and enterprise maintenance efforts.

Contributions to openSUSE Leap from SUSE include several new features like Network Functions Virtualization capabilities that combines Open vSwitch with the Data Plane Development Kit to process packets faster. YaST also has a significant amount of improvements and new features.

Community contributions were equally enormous as more than 1,400 new packages made it into this newest Leap version, with 42.2 providing 17% more packages than 42.1.

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Last Release Candidate for openSUSE Leap 42.2 Released

November 2nd, 2016 by

The development cycle for openSUSE Leap 42.2 Release Candidates (RC) is coming to an end.

RC2, which will be followed by the stable release of openSUSE Leap 42.2 on Nov. 16, is now available for testers after its release today.

“A big change is that the Mesa Nouveau 3D driver was split out to a
separate package as KDE crashes with it on some newer NVidia cards,” wrote release manager Ludwig Nussel to the openSUSE Factory Mailing List.

Users of Leap’s newest version will notice improved capabilities with snapper snapshots based on the btrfs file system, which is the default file system selection. A new btrfs quota concept makes snapper much less disk-hungry and can be manually setup. Snapper is a poka yoke and can give system administrators confident about updating new packages and rolling back the system if an error is made. There is a selection of other file systems for Leap, but benefits of snapper are not available with the other file systems.

Leap is a community-enterprise distribution that appeals to stability-minded users and conservative technology adopters. Leap has a shared core with SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) and hundreds of SLE 12 Service Pack (SP) 2 packages. There are also thousands of community-built packages in Leap. The distribution gives developers and organizations an ability to bridge to the faster release cycles of openSUSE Tumbleweed or to a more Long Term Support enterprise solution with SLE.

Media who are interested in more information should contact Douglas DeMaio at ddemaio@suse.de.

Ceph, Git, YaST, kernel update in Tumbleweed

August 24th, 2016 by

openSUSE Tumbleweed had another abundant week of snapshots.

Four Tumbleweed snapshots were released since the last article and the snapshot of the week, 20160816, brought users a new version of gtk3 (3.20.8). Updated in the repositories for this snapshot was an updated version of yast2-auth-client (3.3.10). Cairo graphics fixed several bugs and Apache2 removed the omc xml config because the change log states it is “useless nowdays.”

Snapshot 20160817 has several updates for the scalable storage platform ceph, which added an ability to reduce the constraints on resources required to build ceph and ceph-test packages. Git updated to version 2.9.3 and glib2 had several subpackages updated as did gnome-desktop. This snapshot caused quite a bit of chatter on the openSUSE Factory mailing list and serves as a reminder for people using openSUSE Tumbleweed to subscribed to the mailing list so they are aware of the updates.

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What to expect from Btrfs on openSUSE 13.2?

November 12th, 2014 by

As the first major Linux distribution to have Btrfs as the default file system, what can users and developers expect from openSUSE 13.2?

How is the systems capabilities enhanced?

Btrfs has different performance characteristics; it’s a logging-style file system that provides fault tolerance, repair, and easy management features.

The most well known advantage of Btrfs is the rollback capability with the open-source tool Snapper.

“Btrfs is mature,” said George Shi, who helped rollbacks become a reality for openSUSE users. “It works with Snapper to implement snapshot and rollback, the killer function of Btrfs. You can pick any date you saved to rollback your full system.”

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