Home Home > Tag > openSUSE Tumbleweed
Sign up | Login

Posts Tagged ‘openSUSE Tumbleweed’

Official KDE Plasma 5.12 Release Now in Tumbleweed

February 8th, 2018 by

Mesa 18, cryptsetup 2 Also Arrive in Snapshots

KDE Plasma 5.12 transitioned from it beta version of 5.11.95 to the official release in an openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshot earlier this week.

On the same day of the upstream release, Tumbleweed snapshot 20180206 brought the new desktop software to its thousands of rolling release users. Improved performance and several new features are available in Plasma 5.12 like Wayland-only Night Color feature that allows adjustments to the screen color temperature to reduce eye strain and the System Activity and System Monitor display per-process graphs for the CPU usage. The new KDE Store offers a wide selection of addons that are ready to be installed. Plasma 5.12 is the second long-term support (LTS) release from the Plasma 5 team and will be the version used in openSUSE’s traditional distribution openSUSE Leap 15, which is expected to be released this spring.

Other notable packages updated in the 20180206 snapshot were compiler cache (ccache) 3.3.6, which improved instructions on how to get cache hits between different working directories. Translations were made for Indonesian, Danish and Catalan in updates of gfxboot from 4.5.26 to 4.5.29. Kernel module handling kmod 25 improved testsuite and allows mkosi to run testsuite in different Linux distributions. The Linux Kernel was updated to 4.15.1.

(more…)

Tumbleweed Snapshots Get YaST Changes for Firewalld

February 1st, 2018 by

There is no signs of slowing down openSUSE’s rolling release  Tumbleweed as six snapshots of new software were released this past week.

Not all the snapshots were large; in fact, one offered just a handful of new packages, but the releases keep coming.

The pixel format translation library babl 0.1.42 was in the latest snapshot 20180130. The new version added format “CIE XYZ alpha” color model and formats. An update to javapackages-tools 5.0.0 fixed the default Java Runtime Environment path. Kexec-tools had a bump to version 2.0.16 and now properly states all post/postun dependencies. A QtNetworkAuth module was added to  python-qt5  5.10 and yast2-dns-server 4.0.1 replaced SuSEFirewall2 with firewalld.

Snapshot 20180129 updated the GNU Compiler Collection to 7.3 and fixed a spelling mistake. Using the web-based translation tool Weblate, the graphical boot screen gfxboot 4.5.26 implemented some Danish contributions. The timezone package updated to version 2018c and southern Brazilians using Tumbleweed will know what time it is on November’s first Sunday due to the addition of code for it’s Daylight Saving Time. The yast2-drbd 4.0.1 also replaced SuSEFirewall2 with firewalld.

A handful of packages were updated in snapshot 20180128. The open source antivirus engine ClamAV package was updated to version 0.99.3; the update addressed some Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) that could have allowed for a denial of service (DoS) condition on an affected device. Both libdvdnav and libdvdread were updated to version 6.0.0 and fix some crashes and DVD issues. Full conversion of source to python3 from python2 was made with vm-install 0.10.01 and the graphical components now require Gtk3.

(more…)

Ruby, YaST, Plasma 5.12 Beta Get Updates in Tumbleweed

January 26th, 2018 by

openSUSE’s rolling distribution Tumbleweed received several snapshot of new software packages this past week.

A total of six snapshots arrived and brought new versions of Ruby, YaST, KDE’s Plasma 5.12 Beta and many others.

The latest snapshot, 20180124, switched the default for Ruby to version 2.5. Package improvements were made to the command line tool SUSEConnect 0.3.7. A change to cups-filters 1.19.0 in order to allow builds on systems without python2 was made with python3-cups rather than using python-cups. Enscript 1.6.6 fixed a handful of bugs and spec-cleaner 1.0.2 added groups for Rust and made the switch to pytest. Git, squid and perl-Encode also received minor updates in the snapshot.

The largest snapshot of the week was no doubt snapshot 20180122. The snapshot provided KDE Applications 17.12.1, Frameworks 5.42.0 and the beta version for KDE’s next  Long-Term-Support (LTS) release of Plasma 5.12. Tumbleweed users can tryout the new items in the 5.12 LTS like the new KDE Store, which brings a wide selection of addons. With the exception of updates to libgme, download manager uget and Oracle’s virtualbox, the release was primarily focused on the new versions from the KDE community. It is worth noting that virtualbox 5.2.6 fixed quite a few Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) and libgme 0.6.2 fixed crashes in nsfe emulator. Gamers should be happy.

(more…)

New Repository Caters to Tumbleweed’s Nvidia Users

September 20th, 2017 by

Using Nvidia drivers on openSUSE Tumbleweed in the past was cumbersome and fragile when it came to regular snapshot updates.

Often users needed to uninstall the NVIDIA’s userspace driver (like libGL, Xserver glx library, etc.) before updating to the latest Tumbleweed snapshot and reinstall the NVIDIA’s userspace driver afterward. Otherwise users may have ended up in a mess with Mesa overwriting NVIDIA’s userspace drivers.

In addition with every kernel update, users needed to recompile the kernel module due to possible Kernel Application Binary Interface (kABI) changes in a new Linux kernel. The easiest way to achieve this was to completely uninstall NVIDIA’s driver (“nvidia-installer –uninstall”) and reinstall it after the Tumbleweed update.

Now, openSUSE Tumbleweed users have a better solution.

(more…)

New KDE Applications, PulseAudio Arrive in Tumbleweed

September 14th, 2017 by

The last openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshot has arrived and brought the newest version of KDE Applications as well as a new PulseAudio version.

KDE Applications 17.08.1 was released in the 20170911 snapshot along with an updated version of GNU Compiler Collection 6. The newest 17.08.1 version included 20 recorded bugfixes with improvements to Gwenview, Kdenlive, Konsole, Okular, KDE games and more. The newer GCC6 version renamed the tarball and source to make factory-auto happy, according to the change log.

Four other snapshots were released since the beginning of last week.

In snapshot 20170909, Mesa 17.2.0 implemented the OpenGL 4.5 Application Programming Interface; the announcement from Mesa suggest that people should stick with the previous version or wait for the 17.2.1 release because of driver support. Users who are blind or visually impaired will be pleased to know that BRLTTY, which drives the braille display and provides complete screen review functionality was updated to version 5.5. Also in the snapshot, the release of iproute2 4.13 brought improvements to the Berkeley Packet Filter (BPF), which provides a raw interface to data link layers and permits raw link-layer packets to be sent and received. (more…)

Website About People of openSUSE Ends Hiatus

June 19th, 2017 by

Interviews with people involved in the openSUSE Project have returned and new pages will be added in the future highlighting individuals involved in the community project.

The first interview to be posted after a five-year hiatus was posted in November of 2016 and highlights Dominique Leuenberger, who is at VLC contributor and release manager for openSUSE Tumbleweed.

Sarah Julia Kriesch, who is a Working Student at ownCloud and member of the Heroes team at openSUSE, discusses in an interview in published in March how she got started with Linux and openSUSE.

The most recent interview published is from Leap release manager Ludwig Nussel, who is a volunteer for a fire brigade in Germany.

The website has interviews dating back at 2007; when many people involved in the project had less grey hair;-). Current interviews focus on newer project members. Interviews include many people involved in the project who participate and contribute to many other open-source projects like Linux kernel developer and Tumbleweed originator Greg Kroah-Hartman, former openSUSE Release Manager and KDE Release Coordinator Stephan Kulow and more.

Introducing Kubic Project: a new open-source project

May 29th, 2017 by

Recent years have seen tremendous growth in the container technologies market. From being a non-existent category just a few years ago to being one of the most interesting, fast development and exciting areas.

Containers change the way we think about application architecture and the speed at which we can deliver on business requirements. They provide consistency and portability across environments and allow developers to focus on building a great product, without the distraction of underlying execution details.

Today the entire application delivery supply chain is changing as the age of abstract application creation is upon us. This change is fueled by the adoption of a few key technologies,  including shared code repositories, continuous integration, continuous development, and cloud computing.  However, the ultimate driver of this movement is a software delivery mechanism: containers.

Project Kubic is a generic project for the many new initiatives related to re-designing the operating system around principles of immutable infrastructure and the usage of a stack based on Linux, docker project and Kubernetes.  The primary building block of the Kubic Project is the Container Host OS based on openSUSE Tumbleweed.

In the near future and with your support, we’ll be enabling Kubernetes and many other new features. This will allow you to easily build Container as a Service (CaaS) solutions and run them everywhere…

How can the Kubic Project help me?

  •  Traditional OS are cool and fun to hack on, but the model with a single runtime environment controlled by the OS and shared by all applications does not meet the requirements of modern application-centric IT.
  • Based on a monolithic approach, the traditional OS brings lots of challenges for managing the stacks running on top of it. With Kubic, we would like to rethink the OS by redesigning it for modern IT applications.
  • In agile environments, developers and DevOps engineers are taking responsibilities over their app and seeking control over the runtime underneath their applications, without necessarily owning the entire stack.
  • VMs provide a means for separation among applications, but this model adds resource and management overhead.

Join our Kubic Project and together we will build the next generation of Container OS

Useful information:

(This blog is written by Simona Arsene and was originally published at https://www.suse.com/communities/blog/introducing-kubic-project-new-open-source-project/)

(more…)