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Archive for November, 2016

Tumbleweed Delivers Incredible Snapshot Streak, Newest Kernel

November 23rd, 2016 by

News of Linux releases are getting most of the headlines during November while snapshots of openSUSE Tumbleweed have subtly been flying under the radar.

Other than Nov. 3 and Nov. 6, openSUSE Tumbleweed had updated software snapshots released every day this month.

The last update on news.opensuse.org included snapshot 20161108 and the 13 snapshots that have followed that have included hundreds of new packages.

The streak will continue past the most recent snapshot that is list 20161121. Snapshot  20161121 updated the Linux kernel to version 4.8.9. The snapshot also includes an update in the repositories for CMake 3.7.0, which adds several new modules and commands.

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MJ Technology Tablet has openSUSE, Dual Boot

November 22nd, 2016 by

It’s official; the Warrior Tablet made by MJ Technology and powered by openSUSE is ready for the world; now it just needs funding through an Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign.

Avid Linux users can reap the benefits of four 10.1” Linux tablets offered by MJ Techology. The specifications of the four tablets vary in power and cost, but all come with the power of Linux and openSUSE at the core.

“MJ Technology, a leader in affordable cutting edge tech, is pleased to introduce the MJ Technology Warrior series tablets powered by openSUSE,” said Mark Jun, CEO for MJ Technology.

The preinstalled image on the Warrior Tablet Series is GNOME on openSUSE Leap, but users are welcome to change/reinstall/use Tumbleweed/etc. Any hardware support will be upstream via the Open Build Service and will not impede different usage patterns, so there is no lock-in, which gives the user choice.

The tablets offer dual boot for Windows 10 or use openSUSE Leap as a sole operating system for personal use. System administrators needing to manage multiple servers remotely can fulfill needs with the World’s First actual Made-for-Linux x86/x64 Tablet.

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openSUSE Mentors Blog about Google Summer of Code Experience

November 22nd, 2016 by

Mentors for this year’s Google Summer of Code blog about their experience being a mentor, the Mentor Summit at Google and the collaborative effort start an openSUSE mentoring page, 101.opensuse.org. View the blow here or read it below.

It is getting colder in Germany, so it’s a time to recap Google Summer of Code 2016. This year we had six great students and in August Google announced that all of our students successfully finished their projects. What great news!

All good things come to an end

This year was especially exciting as we did not make it into GSoC in 2015 and therefore all of our mentors and students worked particularly hard to prepare and realize this year’s edition.

Hernán Schmidt, a first time GSoC mentor, told us about “the great experience to guide a young developer and see him grow”. His student, Rishabh Saxena, who worked on the Open Source Event Manager (OSEM) writes in his final blog article that he learned test driven development and web security. He is now even participating in this year’s Mozilla Winter of Security!

Ana Maria Martinez Gomez, who also worked on OSEM, reports about the great experience of working in an Open Source community and attending the openSUSE Conference in Nuremberg.

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Organize an openSUSE Leap 42.2 Release Party

November 17th, 2016 by

Having a party to celebrate an achievement is always great and the openSUSE community knows how to party; just look at all the fun we have at openSUSE conferences and summits.

With the release of openSUSE Leap 42.2, a release party is in order. Selecting a good date and having some goodies to pass out to the party requires some planning. The checklist below can help with planning the release party, but the most important thing if you plan on having a party is to email ddemaio (at) suse.de well before the party to get some open-source goodies to give away. Please include “Leap 42.2” Party in the subject line and include a mailing address.

checklist:

  1. Find a date.

The date of a party is best during a weekend (because it’s easier for people to join, since most people work during the week), but we all function differently. Find two alternative dates for the party if you want and use http://www.doodle.com/ to find a common date that works for most people.

  1. Find a place

A cafe, bar or Linux group meetup location all work. A coffee and cake release party is just as fun as a beer and pizza release party with the benefit of not having a headache. If music is your group’s thing, try a release party with openSUSE karaoke. There are tons of SUSE songs to choose from on it’s YouTube play list.

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  1. Cake

It is not necessary to have a cake, but it sure is a lot of fun. You can also have openSUSE Cookies. We plan on having a few at the release party in Nuremberg, Germany, on Nov. 24 starting at 5 p.m.

  1. Pictures, pictures, pictures

Bring one or more cameras to take pictures or videos and post them to social media. Tagging the photos with #GeekoParty

  1. Swag

PromoDVDs, webcam covers and stickers – If we can get it to you without too much red tape from governments, we will. Just email that ddemaio guys.

IMPORTANT TIP: Schedule your release party on the wiki and have a lot of fun.

Optimal Release for Linux Professionals Arrives with openSUSE Leap 42.2

November 16th, 2016 by

A Professional Distribution for Developers, System Administrators and Users

(Languages: CZ, DE, EN, ES, FR, IT, JA, LT, TW)

Members of the openSUSE Project are pleased to announce the release of the next minor version of Leap; openSUSE Leap 42.2! Leap is made to give stability-minded users and conservative technology adopters peace of mind. openSUSE Leap 42.2 is powered by the Linux 4.4 Long-Term-Support (LTS) kernel and is a secure, stable and reliable server operating system for deploying IT services in physical, virtual or cloud environments.

A selective process of including well-established packages in openSUSE Leap 42.2 gives new meaning to the term Linux Optimization; openSUSE Leap is simply the safe choice that offers Linux professionals a user-friendly desktop and a feature-rich server environment.

Leap-green.png

Continuing the tradition of using source code from SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE), openSUSE Leap 42.2 provides a level of stability unmatched by other Linux distributions. With community-built packages on top of Leap’s enterprise reliability, openSUSE Leap users benefit both from community and enterprise maintenance efforts.

Contributions to openSUSE Leap from SUSE include several new features like Network Functions Virtualization capabilities that combines Open vSwitch with the Data Plane Development Kit to process packets faster. YaST also has a significant amount of improvements and new features.

Community contributions were equally enormous as more than 1,400 new packages made it into this newest Leap version, with 42.2 providing 17% more packages than 42.1.

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Mesa 13 Arrives in Tumbleweed with New Kernel

November 10th, 2016 by

Tumbleweed-blackThis week has been a bit hectic with dramatic change affecting people around the world, but openSUSE  Tumbleweed users who are use to change can find some clarity in the chaos  with five snapshots that were released this week.

These snapshots brought not only a new major version of Mesa but a new kernel and Plasma 5.8.3.

The newest snapshot 20161108 updated yast2 to version 3.2.3 and added a patch to fix a crash from upstream for Wayland. Lightweight web browser epiphany, which updated to version 3.22.2 in the snapshot, added fixes for adblocker and improved the password form for autofill handling.

Snapshot 20161107 provided minor bug fixes and internal code improvements to git with an update in the repository to version 2.10.2. The package BusyBox, which makes it easy to customize an embedded systems, was updated to version 1.25.1. In the snapshot, version 3.2.0 for yast2-storage improved detect and redefine support for btrfs.

Mesa 13.0 with additions of i965 and vulkan drivers was was updated in the 20161105 snapshot along with a large update to btrfspgrams to 4.8.2. The kernel source were also update in the 20161105 snapshot a day after snapshot 20161104 brought Linux Kernel 4.8.6.

Snapshot 20161104 updated KDE’s Plasma 5.8.3, and gtk3 3.2.2 provided several bugs fixes including a fix to slow startup notification for some gtk3 apps running on wayland. Samba 4.5.0 added a samba-ceph package in the snapshot and sudo 1.8.18p1, with the new seccomp filter, is more robust for developers and system administrators using it rather than the traditional method of using stub functions.

Tumbleweed brings Halloween Treats

November 3rd, 2016 by

A new framework for desktop applications on Linux has been added to Tumbleweed and now users can enjoy the most up-to-date version of Flatpak.

Flatpak 0.6.13 arrived in the 20161028 snapshot  last week and complements another package updated in the snapshot; OSTree 2016.12, which is a tool that combines a “git-like” model for committing and downloading bootable filesystem trees, along with a layer for deploying them and managing the bootloader configuration.

The “new feature will surely need some testing,” wrote Dominique Leuenberger, in his weekly review about Tumbleweed to the Factory Mailing List.

Snapshot 20161028 also provided several updated packages in the repositories including Mozilla Firefox 49.0.2 and Frameworks 5.27.0, which provides new mimetypes icons in the version.

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Last Release Candidate for openSUSE Leap 42.2 Released

November 2nd, 2016 by

The development cycle for openSUSE Leap 42.2 Release Candidates (RC) is coming to an end.

RC2, which will be followed by the stable release of openSUSE Leap 42.2 on Nov. 16, is now available for testers after its release today.

“A big change is that the Mesa Nouveau 3D driver was split out to a
separate package as KDE crashes with it on some newer NVidia cards,” wrote release manager Ludwig Nussel to the openSUSE Factory Mailing List.

Users of Leap’s newest version will notice improved capabilities with snapper snapshots based on the btrfs file system, which is the default file system selection. A new btrfs quota concept makes snapper much less disk-hungry and can be manually setup. Snapper is a poka yoke and can give system administrators confident about updating new packages and rolling back the system if an error is made. There is a selection of other file systems for Leap, but benefits of snapper are not available with the other file systems.

Leap is a community-enterprise distribution that appeals to stability-minded users and conservative technology adopters. Leap has a shared core with SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) and hundreds of SLE 12 Service Pack (SP) 2 packages. There are also thousands of community-built packages in Leap. The distribution gives developers and organizations an ability to bridge to the faster release cycles of openSUSE Tumbleweed or to a more Long Term Support enterprise solution with SLE.

Media who are interested in more information should contact Douglas DeMaio at ddemaio@suse.de.