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GNOME, Notmuch update in Tumbleweed

December 15th, 2016 by

To state that not much has been happening in openSUSE Tumbleweed is an understatement as there were seven snapshot this week.

Life, however, is full of surprises and irony and this article just might end with a little.

The beginning of the week started with snapshot 20161208 that had a change that affects Python users. The update of python3-setuptools to version 30.2.0 dropped support for Python 3.2, which was released in February of 2011. The snapshot also provided an update to Kernel firmware 20161130 with patches affecting Intel Bluetooth.

The next snapshot, 20161209, updated most gstreamer packages to version 1.10.2, which brought Open Graphics Library related bugfixes and a security-relevant bugfix in the vmnc decoder. The text shaping package HarfBuzz updated to 1.3.4 and fixed vertical glyph origin in hb-ot-font and Vala’s update to 0.34.4 had some small bugfixes.

NetworkManager-openconnect 1.2.4 updated translations and fixed support for IPv6-only VPNs and updates to yast2-installation 3.2.11 and yast2-network 3.2.16 had crash fixes.

The updates to gstreamer continued in snapshot 20161210 with gstreamer-editing-services, gstreamer-rtsp-server and gstreamer-validate moving to version 1.10.2, which fixed mostly minor bugs. The snapshot also updated the Linux Kernel to 4.8.13. Python-packaging updated to version 16.8, which provided a fix for rendering and Wine updated to the 2.0 Release Candidate 1 that enhances Shader Model 5 operations.

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Git, Kernels, LightDM, More update in Tumbleweed

December 8th, 2016 by

Many packages made it into openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots this week and two minor kernel versions were just a couple of the several updates that landed in the repositories.

Eight snapshots this week brought both minor and major releases.

Topping the list of updates for snapshot 20161129 was the update to Light Display Manager 1.21.1, which added an Application Programming Interface (API) version to the greeter-daemon protocol for future enhancements.  Other updates in the snapshot include openVPN, which added a recommended utility for network and traffic protocols, and subpackages for systemd relevant for 32-bit users. Desktop manager xfdesktop updated to version 4.12.3 and introduced rotating wallpaper images if the images contain rotation information.

The programming language vala, which aims to bring modern programming language features to GNOME developers without imposing any additional runtime requirements, updated in the 20161129 and 20161201 snapshots.

Snapshot 20161201 brought the first kernel update of the week with version 4.8.11 and the kernel firmware was updated to 20161121. Tumbleweed user will be happy to see the amount of hplip subpackages added in this snapshot, which brings added support for several hp printers. Several K series subpackages from KDE received updates in the 20161201 snapshot.

The most interesting snapshot of the week probably arrived with snapshot 20161202.  In the snapshot, several Mesa 13.0.2 subpackages were updated that provided graphical fixes for enhancing Wayland, Vulkan and X11. FFmpeg 3.2.1 brought new codec fixes and provided a  regressions fix for audio-visual loss during streaming.

Git 2.11.0 provides developers several improvements with many new command line and configuration options. Git 2.11 is faster at accessing delta chains in its object database and improves performance of many common operations. (more…)

Tumbleweed Delivers Incredible Snapshot Streak, Newest Kernel

November 23rd, 2016 by

News of Linux releases are getting most of the headlines during November while snapshots of openSUSE Tumbleweed have subtly been flying under the radar.

Other than Nov. 3 and Nov. 6, openSUSE Tumbleweed had updated software snapshots released every day this month.

The last update on news.opensuse.org included snapshot 20161108 and the 13 snapshots that have followed that have included hundreds of new packages.

The streak will continue past the most recent snapshot that is list 20161121. Snapshot  20161121 updated the Linux kernel to version 4.8.9. The snapshot also includes an update in the repositories for CMake 3.7.0, which adds several new modules and commands.

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Release Candidate Available for openSUSE Leap 42.2

October 18th, 2016 by

hexapatternThe openSUSE Project is pleased to announce the availability of the openSUSE Leap 42.2 Release Candidate 1 (RC1).

Since mid-May, the project has been guiding the development of the next openSUSE community release Leap 42.2, which will be released in 29 days. The release of RC1 completes the development process for openSUSE Leap 42.2 based on source code from SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) Service Pack (SP) 2.

RC1 delivers a professional version that includes OpenStack client software and several other software stacks developers and system administrators will find useful.

RC1 adds new bug fixes for KDE as Plasma 5.8.1 provides several commits to provide a more stable performance for KDE users. The Long-Term Support (LTS) version of Plasma 5.8 has several open-source users excited about the stability potential and rebirth of the KDE.

GNOME games were updated in RC1 as five-or-more,  four-in-a-row and Iagno updated to the GNOME 3.20.2 version.

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GNOME 3.22 Streamlines Into Tumbleweed

September 23rd, 2016 by


Less than 48 hours from when GNOME’s release team unveiled version 3.22 (Karlsruhe), openSUSE Tumbleweed users are getting the full upstream experience of the latest GNOME.

Snapshot 20160921 made 3.22 available to user, but there were plenty of other snapshots during the week that brought new packages to Tumbleweed users.

Dominique Leuenberger, a member of the openSUSE release team, wrote that there were five snapshots this week in an email to developers on the openSUSE Factory Mailing List.

The Linux Kernel updated to 4.7.4 and VirtualBox updated a version in the 20160920 snapshot. Snapshot 20160914 updated KDE Frameworks to 5.26.0 and KDE Applications 16.08.1.

Even though Tumbleweed is built on GNU Composite Compiler 6.2.1, for user relying on GCC 5, snapshot 20160917 provided an update to GCC 5.4.1 and there was a major version update for Vim, which is the first major update for the project in a decade and updated from version 7.4.2045 to version 8.0.3.

New compiler expected in next Tumbleweed snapshot

June 15th, 2016 by

Tumbleweed-blackA new GNU Compiler Collection for openSUSE‘s rolling release Tumbleweed is scheduled to arrive soon.

Tumbleweed 20160613 snapshot will be the last snapshot to be based on GCC 5, according to the openSUSE Project’s Dominique Leuenberger.

GCC 6 will become the new default compiler, but the release date of the snapshot is difficult to predict right now because Tumbleweed is competing with builds allocated for the next Alpha 2 release of openSUSE Leap 42.2, which is scheduled to be release next week before the openSUSE Conference.

Some fixes in the GCC 6 snapshot will likely be needed, so users should pay attention to the openSUSE Factory Mailing List for any fixes that might be necessary.

Previous snapshots this week also brought some goodies in the repositories for users. Snapshot 20160612 provided Mozilla Firefox 47.0, kernel-firmware 20160609 and AppStream 0.9.6.

The 20160611 snapshot provided git 2.8.4 and several updated YaST packages in the repositories while snapshot 20160609 brought updates to gstreamer, Wayland (1.11.0) and autoyast2.

Help Test Alpha 2 Release

As for Leap 42.2, a lot of focus was made on systemd and GNOME for the Alpha 2 release. Once Alpha 2 is released, we encourage people to test it and get involved with the development on the openSUSE Factory Mailing List.

View the road map for Leap 42.2 releases at https://en.opensuse.org/openSUSE:Roadmap.

New Kernel, KDE Applications to arrive in Tumbleweed

June 1st, 2016 by

Tumbleweed-blackopenSUSE Leap 42.2 Alpha 1, which is now available for testing, made some news last week, but this week’s news focuses more on openSUSE’s rolling distribution.

Developers have been focusing on  moving Tumbleweed to GNU Compiler Collection 6, which is always challenging for a distribution.

In the openSUSE Tumbleweed’s Review of the Weeks 2016/21 email sent out last week by Dominique Leuenberger, he listed the progression of moving GCC 6 to the default compiler, which can be viewed on the wiki.

Leuenberger also hinted at the Linux Kernel 4.6 possibly being ready for a snapshot this week. It looks like 4.6 will be in a snapshot with week along with KDE Applications 16.04.1 and Perl 5.24.

This week had three openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots. New perl and wine package updates are in the Tumbleweed repository from snapshot 20160530 .

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What to expect from Btrfs on openSUSE 13.2?

November 12th, 2014 by

As the first major Linux distribution to have Btrfs as the default file system, what can users and developers expect from openSUSE 13.2?

How is the systems capabilities enhanced?

Btrfs has different performance characteristics; it’s a logging-style file system that provides fault tolerance, repair, and easy management features.

The most well known advantage of Btrfs is the rollback capability with the open-source tool Snapper.

“Btrfs is mature,” said George Shi, who helped rollbacks become a reality for openSUSE users. “It works with Snapper to implement snapshot and rollback, the killer function of Btrfs. You can pick any date you saved to rollback your full system.”

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Gnome Classic edition of openSUSE-Education

May 22nd, 2014 by

If you have fun, the rest is easy…

Classic main menu The openSUSE-Education team is proud to announce the availability of another great release: the GNOME classic edition.

This one is nearly identical to the MATE desktop, but already includes a few minor bug fixes and some additional applications:

are added to the (already huge) list of available applications.

Quoting Jigish Gohil:

classic is so much better than standard gnome  i wonder why it is not standard

BTW: openSUSE Education releases always contain the latest official openSUSE updates and other cool stuff, so you should be able to get an up-to date live system up and running in a few seconds/minutes (depending on your hardware) – which can also be installed on your local hard disk with just a few mouse clicks. Just click on the “Live-Install” icon on the desktop.

Get Li-f-e GNOME Classic edition from here: direct Download | md5sum | Alternate download and mirrors

You want to join the team? Just ping us at #opensuse-education. We are hiring community members to help out on web work and marketing (be warned: we currently pay in honor and fun).

openSUSE Kicks Off Development with Milestone 1

May 17th, 2013 by

13.1-Milestone1
openSUSE is pleased to announce that the newest Milestone for the upcoming version of openSUSE 13.1. is available for testing. As early version, it is expected that this Milestone is not fully functional or very stable and we welcome bug reports and fixes for the issues. This is the first in a series of upcoming updates to the distribution that will end with the final release of 13.1 projected by November of 2013. As usual with an alpha release, the most prominent changes in openSUSE 13.1 Milestone 1 come from the upgrades that packages are going through.

Major updates

Some major updates below:

  • GNOME 3.6 > 3.8.1
  • apache2 2.2.22 > 2.4.3
  • digikam 3.0.0 > 3.1.0
  • giflib 4.1.6 > 5.0.3
  • icecream 0.9.7 > 1.0.0
  • kernel 3.7.10 > 3.9.0
  • libreoffice 3.6.3.2.4 > 4.0.2.2.1
  • ocaml 3.12.1 > 4.00.1
  • qemu 1.3.0 > 1.4.0
  • qt-creator 2.6.2 > 2.7.0
  • ruby 1.9.3 > 2.0
  • systemd 195 > 202
  • wpa_supplicant 1.1 > 2.0
  • xorg-x11-server 1.13.2 > 1.14.1

Most Annoying Bugs

The list of most annoying bugs is still short. We’re looking towards you to help us make that list bigger! We need to find out what’s wrong so we can fix it. You can report bugs with this link. The process of reporting bugs involves a couple of steps that you can take in order to contribute with the distribution. Reporting bugs and problems with the packages is essential for openSUSE to retain its stability. Please review our sections on how to contribute to factory, and submitting bug reports.

You’re more than welcome to organize some bug-finding-and-squashing sessions! Take a look at previous efforts in our last beta-pizza-party!

Planned Changes

Some time ago, the team posted a suggested list of changes for openSUSE 13.1. The idea behind this is to accept the changes provided by the community and at the same time meet specific team goals. Please keep in mind that this list is subject to change but it helps when understanding where the next release of openSUSE would like to go.

For the base system, planned changes include updating GCC to version 4.8 and working on the latest integrations for the Linux Kernel. On booting there was a discussion looking to completely move to SYSTEMD and dropping SYSVINIT. Replacing MKINITRD with Dracut.

On the KDE environment the planned list includes making PHONON support GSTREAMER 1.0 and replacing Kopete, largely unmaintained now, to KDE Telepathy. Gnome is also looking to change a few things in 13.1 starting by adding Gnome 3.10, cleaning out some outdated libraries and changing its default theme to a greener one.

On security the list is simple so far, AppArmor will be promoted further as a preferred security suite and updating SELinux.

Get involved!

This list of possible changes can also be altered by your participation. If you are a developer looking to learn and participate of the openSUSE project through coding, packaging or coordinating efforts to include certain software on the distribution, go to our factory page and learn more about how to contribute code. The process of working packages into the factory release is also documented in an article for the release of openSUSE 12.3. If you are interested in making contributions for packages, please go here and get packaging! Although the link is for 12.3, keep in mind that the packaging process done on 13.1 is the same. If your are familiar with branching projects through GIT, making contributions to the factory development should be easy for you. In simple words, you access the openSUSE repository, branch the specific part you would like to work on, make the appropriate updates and then you make requests to our team to include your changes.

However, the work on openSUSE is not only belonging or limited to packaging. There is far more that can be done here. Marketing, team coordination, translation, artwork, etc. These are simple examples of what more of you could be doing for the team. If you are willing to participate, take a look at this page and choose!

Schedule

Master Coolo published a simple road map. The next milestone is expected for 6 of June, 2013. the next milestones come with about a month in between, Beta 1 is planned for the 19th of September, RC one will be on October 10 and RC2 on October 31st.