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Thunderbird, YaST, Sudo Updates Arrive in Tumbleweed

November 29th, 2018 by

Three openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots were released since the last blog.

The three Tumbleweed snapshots this week brought a newer Linux Kernel, several rubygem package updates and improvements for an Xfce support library.

Snapshot 20181126 brought the 4.19.4 Linux Kernel, which fixed accelerated VLAN handling and fixed a memory leak with the Nouveau secure boot. Yet another Setup Tool (YaST) had some updates with yast2-fonts 4.0.2 that changes the desktop file fonts to system-wide fonts and multiple translations were also updated with the yast2-trans package. The support library for Xfce desktop environment, exo, updated to version 0.12.3; it improved layout spacing and alignment and hides the exo launchers from GNOME Software. The package for Integrated Development Environment cross-platform, kdevelop5 5.3.0, brought improved language support for php, python and c++; it also offers a new clazy analyzer plugin. Multiple other libraries were updated including libjansson 2.11, libsemanage 2.8, libsepol 2.8, libzypp 17.9.0 and more. Several rubygem packages were updated in the snapshot and rubygem-bundler 1.17.1 had a significant amount of additions and improvements including an add config option to disable platform warnings. The mailutils 3.5 package for the handling of email fixed a bug in the base64 encoder. Parser generator bison 3.2.2 brought massive improvements to the deterministic C++ skeleton, lalr1.cc and the library for manipulation of TIFF images, tiff 4.0.10, added a few patches that address the 10 Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) patches that were removed.

Eight packages were updated in the 20181122 snapshot; three of them were YaST associated packages like yast2-ntp-client 4.1.6, which aligned a  “Synchronize Now” button and “NTP Server Address” box, which doesn’t break the previous fix and does not hide the manual checkbox in TextMode. The fourth release candidate of the free implementation of the Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) freerdp 2.0.0,  added support to set the Transport Layer Security (TLS) security level for openssl 1.1.0 and also added smartcard support for substring filters. Sudo now treats the LOGNAME and USER environment variables (as well as the LOGIN variable on AIX) as a single unit with the update to sudo 1.8.26, which also added support for the OpenLDAP TLS_REQCERT setting in the ldap.conf. The xapian-core 1.4.9 package fixed a bug to efficiently handle insertion of a batch of extra positions in ascending order, which could lead to missing positions and corrupted encoded positional data, according to the changelog.

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Registration, CfP for openSUSE Conference 2019 Open

August 31st, 2018 by

openSUSE is pleased to announce that registration and the call for papers for the openSUSE Conference 2019 (oSC19), which takes place in Nuremberg, Germany, are open.

The dates for this year’s conference will be May 24 through May 26 once again at the Z-Bau. Submission for the call for papers will be open until Feb 3. Registration for the conference is open until the day oSC19 begins.

Presentations can be submitted in one of the following formats:

  • Lightning Talks (15 mins)
  • Short Talks (30 mins)
  • Normal Talks (45 mins)
  • Long Workshop (3 hours)
  • Short Workshop (90 mins)

The tracks listed for the conference are:

  • openSUSE
  • Open Source Software
  • Cloud and Containers
  • Embedded Systems
  • Desktop and Applications

While these tracks might be refined to better categorize or consolidate topics, people should submit proposals even if they don’t think it fits into one of the tracks.

A Program Committee will evaluate the proposals based on the submitted abstracts and the accepted proposals will be announced mid February.

Volunteers who would like to participate on the Program Committee or the Organizing Team for the conference should email ddemaio (@) suse.de.

Visit events.opensuse.org for more information about oSC19.

Plasma 5.11, GNOME 3.26.1 Land in Tumbleweed

October 12th, 2017 by

The week has been pretty exciting for desktop enthusiast running openSUSE Tumbleweed since two of this week’s snapshots delivered new versions of GNOME and KDE respectively.

Snapshot 20171010, which is the most recent release, fixed numerous memory leaks with ImageMagick 7.0.7.6 and apache 2.4.28 fixed Optionsbleed or Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE)-2017-9798, which allows remote attackers to read secret data from process memory. Cmake 3.9.4 added support for Boost 1.65.0 and 1.65.1 and hplip 3.17.9 added support for several new printers. New features were added for the Quick Emulator (QEMU) with the new libvirt 3.8.0 version. Two major version updates were also available in the snapshot; some targets may rebuild when upgrading with the software construction tool SCons 3.0.0 and the memory allocator Jemalloc 5.0.1 added several improvements and new features including the addition of mutex profiling, which collects a variety of statistics useful for diagnosing overhead/contention issues.

Tumbleweed KDE users saw Plasma 5.11 make its way into snapshot 20171009 less than 24 hours after the official upstream release. The new Plasma 5.11 brings a redesigned settings app, improved notifications and a more powerful task manager. The release is the first release to contain the new “Vault”, a system to allow the user to encrypt and open sets of documents in a secure and user-friendly way.    Several CVE fixes were made with the update of Mozilla Firefox 56.0, but users should be aware that Firefox has no 32-bit builds for the application. The Linux Kernel was also upgraded to version 4.13.5 in the snapshot.

Several libraries and XFCE plugins were updated in the 20171007 snapshot and Mesa 17.2.2 had several Vulkan ANV/RADV driver fixes. Support for LLVM 5.0 for the Gallium3D architecture when using SCons was also added with the new Mesa version. YaST 4.0.10 fixed the handling of Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) signatures when running in insecure mode. (more…)

GNU Compiler Collection 7 Now openSUSE Tumbleweed Default

June 1st, 2017 by

The default compiler for openSUSE Tumbleweed became GNU Compiler Collection 7 after the release of snapshot 20170529 making openSUSE the first major distribution to have the new compiler by default.

While Tumbleweed still has GCC6, GCC7 is now the standard for completing executable binaries for the chameleon’s rolling distribution and the change momentarily slowed down the rapid release cycle of Tumbleweed.

“A major update like GCC always take a lot of preparation time and, as it shows in this case, even then some things can slip through,” wrote Dominique Leuenberger is an email to the openSUSE Factory Mailing List, which people who use openSUSE Tumbleweed should subscribe. Luckily, no damage was done to any system in the wild yet.”

The snapshot did expose a graphical glitch with Mozilla Thunderbird has since been fixed.

GCC 7 contains a number of enhancements that help detect buffer overflow and other forms of invalid memory accesses, according to its change log. Position Independent Executables was also enabled by default together with the switch to GCC7.

Snapshot 20170529 also brought a major version change to mono-core (version 5.0), which is an open source, cross platform .NET framework based on the ECMA standards for C# and the Common Language Runtime. Another major version change was made to xfce4-panel-plugin-mount, which updated from version 0.6.4 to version 1.1.2; the newer version offers various bugfixes, feature enhancements and port to GTK3. Two other major version changes also came in the snapshot with icu 59.1 and the advanced power management tool tlp 1.0.

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Xfce and openSUSE – Five Steps to Perfection

January 12th, 2015 by

Hi there, geekos!

You’ve probably read about openSUSE being touted as a “king of KDE distros”, with reviewers and journalists emphasizing the projects commitment to a unique KDE experience. There also seems to be a little more buzz concerning GNOME, since its 3.14 iteration – I, personally, haven’t read so many praises for the GNOME project since the Gnome 3 Shell introduction some threeish years ago. Also, the 13.2 version has seen the addition of MATE desktop. But, alongside the two big players and a somewhat nostalgic emerging project, we have the crowd’s favorite little big project – Xfce. So, how does the mouse compare to the sole and the dragon?

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Announcing openSUSE 11.0 Beta 1

April 18th, 2008 by

The openSUSE team is proud to announce the first Beta release of openSUSE 11.0! There are many exciting enhancements and features in the new release. Among these is the incredibly fast package management (libzypp), KDE 3.5.9 and 4.0.3, GNOME 2.22.1, a beautiful new installer, live CDs and much more.

What’s New

 

The openSUSE 11.0 beta 1 includes quite a few changes and new features that users will find interesting, including:

KDE 4 and KDE 3.5: The openSUSE 11.0 beta 1 includes KDE 4.0.3, which includes a number of new features, fixes, and optimizations. See the KDE4 page for more info on the KDE4 branch. To help test, see the wiki for info on reporting bugs in KDE. Not quite ready to move to KDE4? No worries, the beta includes an installation option for KDE 3.5 in addition to KDE4.

GNOME 2.22: Beta 1 includes GNOME 2.22.1 with plenty of new features and packages. Interested in helping with testing for GNOME in openSUSE 11.0? See the wiki for all the info you need.

YaST ported to Qt4: openSUSE’s administration and installation tool, YaST, has been ported to Qt4, providing beautiful styling for the installer, and an improved look for areas such as package management.

Screenshots!

 

Here’s a quick look at openSUSE 11.0 beta 1:

os110beta1-inst7_thumb.jpg os110beta1-kde4-2_thumb.jpg

os110beta1-kde3_thumb.jpg os110beta1-gnome_thumb.jpg

For some more screenshots head over to Screenshots/openSUSE_11.0_Beta1 on the wiki.

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