Home Home > Tag > xfce
Sign up | Login

Posts Tagged ‘xfce’

New node.js LTS, GNU Debugger, libvirt Updates Arrive in Tumbleweed Snapshots

June 13th, 2019 by

The three openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots released this week updated some key packages for users of the rolling release.

One of those key packages was an update of the GNU Debugger, gdb 8.3, which was released in the 20190607 snapshot. The debugger enabled ada tests on ppc64le and riscv64; multitarget builds for riscv64 were also enabled. The snapshot also added unit test for Logical Volume Manager (LVM) over Modular Disk (MD) with the update of libstorage-ng 4.1.127. Several patches and bug fixes were applied with the update of libvirt 5.4.0, which also made an improvement to avoided unnecessary static linking that results in both the disk and memory footprint being reduced. Libvirt also introduced support for the md-clear CPUID bit. The python-libvirt-python 5.4.0 package added all new Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) and constants in libvirt 5.4.0. Text editor vim 8.1.1467 had multiple fixes, but the Tumbleweed snapshot introduced some new bugs and is currently trending at an 86 rating, according to the snapshot reviewer.

The two previous snapshots recorded an exceptional stable rating of 98 according to the snapshot reviewer.

Snapshot 20190606 updated just two packages. The nodejs10 package put out a new upstream Long-Term-Support (LTS) version with nodejs10 10.16.0, which upgraded upgrade openssl sources to 1.1.1b and libuv to 1.28.0. The other package update in the snapshot was xfdesktop 4.12.5; the package for the Xfce 4 Desktop Environment fixed icon sizes in settings, reset the desktop icon order and fixed a timer leak.

The 20190605 snapshot had three packages updated. Linux Kernel 5.1.7 had some fixes pertaining to Btrfs like fixing the in-core state with a storage device between ranged fsync and writeback of adjacent ranges. The kernel update also removed dependencies with the arch_timer driver internals for the arm architecture and added Ice Lake support for Intel’s x86 power mode or c-state. Time Zones were updated with the libical 3.0.5 package and the libinput 1.13.2 package made some changes for Wacom touchpads and Apple bluetooth touchpad.

Release manager Dominique Leuenberger wrote a review of the previous two weeks and stated that openssl 1.1.1c, Texlive 2019, KDE Plasma 5.16, Qt 5.13, LLVM 8, swig 4.0, and cmake 3.14 were all progressing in the staging projects and will be released soon in upcoming Tumbleweed snapshots.

openSUSE Community Releases Leap 15.1 Version

May 22nd, 2019 by

Leap 15.1 Supports More Hardware, Drivers, Enhances Installation

EN / CA / DE / FR / IT / ES / JA / NL / PL / ZH / ZH-TW

22/05/2019

NUREMBERG, Germany – Today’s release of the openSUSE Leap 15.1 brings professional users, entrepreneurs and Independent Software Vendors updated support for modern hardware.

The release of Leap 15.1 improves YaST functionality and the installer.

“Continuity and stability are what we are providing users with Leap 15.1,” said Haris Sehic, a member of the openSUSE community. “With Leap 15, we have introduced a huge number of new features and innovations in security, performance and tool/desktop area. Having in mind how stable, efficient and reliable Leap has become, with this release, we managed to keep the level of quality to the point that our private and Small Business users can, actually more than ever, profit from the enterprise background of an openSUSE Linux Distribution. Let’s continue to have a lot of fun!”

Leap releases are scalable and both the desktop and server are equally important for professional’s workloads, which is reflected in the installation menu as well as the amount of packages Leap offers and hardware it supports. Leap is well suited and prepared for usage as a Virtual Machine (VM) or container guest, allowing professional users to efficiently run network services no matter whether it’s a single server or a data center.

Professional users, system administrators and developers can have confidence in the reliability of the Leap distribution based on its development process to deliver a modern, secure, maintained and highly tested distribution using the open-source build system unique to both SUSE and openSUSE, which is the Open Build Service, along with the automated testing of openQA.

What’s New

An entirely new graphics stack update is available for this stable community- and enterprise-based open-source GNU/Linux distribution. Graphics hardware supported by the 4.19 Linux Kernel were backported for the release of Leap 15.1, which uses the 4.12 Linux Kernel and supports additional graphics drivers for Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) and improved support for AMD Vega chipset.

GPU virtualization has become quite popular among vendors like AMD, Intel and Nvidia and Leap 15.1 helps to delivers these implementation and support solutions for virtualized and cloud environments.

Leap 15.1 will now use Network Manager by default for both laptops and desktops – previously only laptops defaulted to Network Manager. Server installations will continue to default to Wicked, the openSUSE advanced network configuration system. The release adds a few popular WiFi drivers for more modern wireless chipsets. A change that applies to both Wicked and Network Manager is that /etc/resolv.conf, yp.conf and some other files are a link to a file in /run and are managed by netconfig.

The management of system services in YaST has been revamped to take advantage of many of the features offered by systemd in that area.

Improved Setup and Configuration

Some of the improvements to YaST have made for better management of services. Firewalld can be managed in text mode. There is a new User Interface to manage Firewalld, including AutoYaST support/advancements. System administrators will have better control with Salt formulas in the yast2-configuration-management module, and management of SSH keys per user will make sysadmins tasks much more pleasant.

YaST comes with an improved Partitioner, that now can automatically format full disks without partition tables, create software MD RAIDs on top of full disks, create partitions within a software-defined MD RAID and many other combinations. AutoYaST also supports all these combinations. The work the YaST team has put into the setup and configuration tool has a better default partitioning proposal in several scenarios like those with small disks or systems with several disks making solutions easier for Linux professionals. Leap 15.1 brings new YaST icons developed by the community.

The YaST team worked hard on improving the 4k display (HiDPI) experience. HiDPI displays are now autodetected and the UI is auto-scaled giving the installer a beautifully crisp interface.

Security and Maintenance

(more…)

Stable Sailing For Tumbleweed Snapshots This Week

May 16th, 2019 by

Developers Can Make Use of GCC 9, QEMU 4, Wireshark 3

This week produced a smooth and rapid release of stable openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshot as the rolling release produced a total of five stable or trending stable snapshots, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

The production of snapshots provided both large and small package updates with GNU Compiler Collection 9, Wireshark 3.0.1, QEMU 4.0, KDE Applications 19.04.1, GNOME 3.32.2 and KDE Plasma 5.15.5 rounding out the largest package updates this week.

The latest Tumbleweed snapshot, 20190514, hailed in twenty recorded bug fixes for KDE Applications 19.04.1, which include improvements to Kontact, Ark, Cantor, Dolphin, Kdenlive, Spectacle and Umbrello. Among the highlighted fixes were a crash in KMail’s text sharing plugin that was fixed and regressions in the video editor Kdenlive were corrected. The Advanced Linux Sound Architecture (alsa) 1.1.9 dropped several patches and fixed a rate plugin for comparisons as well as added support for GCC’s LinkTimeOptimization. The VLC audio visual decoder package dav1d 0.3.1 provided arm optimization for Multiple Sequence Alignment Compressor (MSAC). The package that has the implementation of HTTP/2 and its header compression algorithm HPACK in C, nghttp2, fixed a compilation against modern LibreSSL in the 1.38.0 version update. Tcsh 6.21.00 ported patches and the 4.2.15 version of yast2-storage-ng worked on the partitioner to prevent edition of block devices that are part of a multi-device Btrfs. The snapshot is currently trending at a 96 rating, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

(more…)

openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 Bali: Call for proposals is Open

May 1st, 2019 by

The openSUSE.Asia Committee call for proposals for openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 is now open.

openSUSE.Asia Summit is one of the great events for openSUSE community (i.e., both contributors and users) in Asia. Those who usually communicate online can get together from all over the world, talk face to face, and have fun.  Members of the community will share their most recent knowledge, experiences, and learn FLOSS technologies surrounding openSUSE.

Following the Asia Summit in Taipei last year, the sixth openSUSE.Asia Summit year 2019 will be at Udayana University, Bali Indonesia on October 5th and 6th, 2019. The past Asia Summits have had participants from Indonesia, China, Taiwan, Japan, South Korea, India, Nepal, and etc.

Call for proposals

The speakers are eligible to receive sponsorship from openSUSE Travel Support Program (TSP). Even if you live away from Bali, please consider applying for the event.

Topics

openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 will invite talks/workshop relevant to openSUSE and other topics like Cloud, Virtualization, Container, Container Orchestration, Linux desktop environments and applications since openSUSE is a collection of various FLOSS products. The examples of the topics (not limited to) are as the following:

  • openSUSE (including Leap, Tumbleweed, Open Build Services, OpenQA, YaST)
  • openSUSE Kubic, Cloud, Virtualization, Container, and Container Orchestration
  • Embedded and IoT
  • Linux kernel and file system
  • Security (Access/Integrity control, Cryptography, Vulnerability management)
  • Desktop environments and applications (e.g. GNOME, KDE, XFCE)
  • Office suite, graphic art, multimedia (e.g. LibreOffice, Calligra, GIMP, Inkscape)
  • Multilingualization support (e.g. input methods, translation)
  • Other software running on openSUSE

(more…)

Return of the Rodents: Xfce is back in openSUSE Tumbleweed Installer

April 10th, 2019 by

We are very pleased to announce that installing the lightweight and slim desktop environment Xfce in openSUSE Tumbleweed just got faster and hassle-free!

Along with GNOME and KDE Plasma, Xfce can now be conveniently selected from the installer’s main screen, as your desktop environment from both DVD installer and net installer. All this is combined with a carefully picked selection of packages that rounds off our offered system to get you started quickly and easily.

Our Xfce team has invested a lot of work in the past months to optimize the “cute mouse” by focusing on the desktop and the underlying rolling release of Tumbleweed. It features applications that better suit the desktop, as well as new modern themes that make the default experience refreshing and enjoyable.

Finally, there is a relatively new project in the Open Build Service (OBS), which builds automatically and daily development versions of Xfce software from Xfce Git Master branch. Through this repository, openSUSE Xfce packagers and contributors are able to test commits and can spot bugs before official releases.
Xfce users are welcome to test it and contribute to it at X11:xfce:rat. [1]

Going live

(more…)

Thunderbird, YaST, Sudo Updates Arrive in Tumbleweed

November 29th, 2018 by

Three openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots were released since the last blog.

The three Tumbleweed snapshots this week brought a newer Linux Kernel, several rubygem package updates and improvements for an Xfce support library.

Snapshot 20181126 brought the 4.19.4 Linux Kernel, which fixed accelerated VLAN handling and fixed a memory leak with the Nouveau secure boot. Yet another Setup Tool (YaST) had some updates with yast2-fonts 4.0.2 that changes the desktop file fonts to system-wide fonts and multiple translations were also updated with the yast2-trans package. The support library for Xfce desktop environment, exo, updated to version 0.12.3; it improved layout spacing and alignment and hides the exo launchers from GNOME Software. The package for Integrated Development Environment cross-platform, kdevelop5 5.3.0, brought improved language support for php, python and c++; it also offers a new clazy analyzer plugin. Multiple other libraries were updated including libjansson 2.11, libsemanage 2.8, libsepol 2.8, libzypp 17.9.0 and more. Several rubygem packages were updated in the snapshot and rubygem-bundler 1.17.1 had a significant amount of additions and improvements including an add config option to disable platform warnings. The mailutils 3.5 package for the handling of email fixed a bug in the base64 encoder. Parser generator bison 3.2.2 brought massive improvements to the deterministic C++ skeleton, lalr1.cc and the library for manipulation of TIFF images, tiff 4.0.10, added a few patches that address the 10 Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) patches that were removed.

Eight packages were updated in the 20181122 snapshot; three of them were YaST associated packages like yast2-ntp-client 4.1.6, which aligned a  “Synchronize Now” button and “NTP Server Address” box, which doesn’t break the previous fix and does not hide the manual checkbox in TextMode. The fourth release candidate of the free implementation of the Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) freerdp 2.0.0,  added support to set the Transport Layer Security (TLS) security level for openssl 1.1.0 and also added smartcard support for substring filters. Sudo now treats the LOGNAME and USER environment variables (as well as the LOGIN variable on AIX) as a single unit with the update to sudo 1.8.26, which also added support for the OpenLDAP TLS_REQCERT setting in the ldap.conf. The xapian-core 1.4.9 package fixed a bug to efficiently handle insertion of a batch of extra positions in ascending order, which could lead to missing positions and corrupted encoded positional data, according to the changelog.

(more…)

Registration, CfP for openSUSE Conference 2019 Open

August 31st, 2018 by

openSUSE is pleased to announce that registration and the call for papers for the openSUSE Conference 2019 (oSC19), which takes place in Nuremberg, Germany, are open.

The dates for this year’s conference will be May 24 through May 26 once again at the Z-Bau. Submission for the call for papers will be open until Feb 3. Registration for the conference is open until the day oSC19 begins.

Presentations can be submitted in one of the following formats:

  • Lightning Talks (15 mins)
  • Short Talks (30 mins)
  • Normal Talks (45 mins)
  • Long Workshop (3 hours)
  • Short Workshop (90 mins)

The tracks listed for the conference are:

  • openSUSE
  • Open Source Software
  • Cloud and Containers
  • Embedded Systems
  • Desktop and Applications

While these tracks might be refined to better categorize or consolidate topics, people should submit proposals even if they don’t think it fits into one of the tracks.

A Program Committee will evaluate the proposals based on the submitted abstracts and the accepted proposals will be announced mid February.

Volunteers who would like to participate on the Program Committee or the Organizing Team for the conference should email ddemaio (@) suse.de.

Visit events.opensuse.org for more information about oSC19.

Plasma 5.11, GNOME 3.26.1 Land in Tumbleweed

October 12th, 2017 by

The week has been pretty exciting for desktop enthusiast running openSUSE Tumbleweed since two of this week’s snapshots delivered new versions of GNOME and KDE respectively.

Snapshot 20171010, which is the most recent release, fixed numerous memory leaks with ImageMagick 7.0.7.6 and apache 2.4.28 fixed Optionsbleed or Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE)-2017-9798, which allows remote attackers to read secret data from process memory. Cmake 3.9.4 added support for Boost 1.65.0 and 1.65.1 and hplip 3.17.9 added support for several new printers. New features were added for the Quick Emulator (QEMU) with the new libvirt 3.8.0 version. Two major version updates were also available in the snapshot; some targets may rebuild when upgrading with the software construction tool SCons 3.0.0 and the memory allocator Jemalloc 5.0.1 added several improvements and new features including the addition of mutex profiling, which collects a variety of statistics useful for diagnosing overhead/contention issues.

Tumbleweed KDE users saw Plasma 5.11 make its way into snapshot 20171009 less than 24 hours after the official upstream release. The new Plasma 5.11 brings a redesigned settings app, improved notifications and a more powerful task manager. The release is the first release to contain the new “Vault”, a system to allow the user to encrypt and open sets of documents in a secure and user-friendly way.    Several CVE fixes were made with the update of Mozilla Firefox 56.0, but users should be aware that Firefox has no 32-bit builds for the application. The Linux Kernel was also upgraded to version 4.13.5 in the snapshot.

Several libraries and XFCE plugins were updated in the 20171007 snapshot and Mesa 17.2.2 had several Vulkan ANV/RADV driver fixes. Support for LLVM 5.0 for the Gallium3D architecture when using SCons was also added with the new Mesa version. YaST 4.0.10 fixed the handling of Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) signatures when running in insecure mode. (more…)

GNU Compiler Collection 7 Now openSUSE Tumbleweed Default

June 1st, 2017 by

The default compiler for openSUSE Tumbleweed became GNU Compiler Collection 7 after the release of snapshot 20170529 making openSUSE the first major distribution to have the new compiler by default.

While Tumbleweed still has GCC6, GCC7 is now the standard for completing executable binaries for the chameleon’s rolling distribution and the change momentarily slowed down the rapid release cycle of Tumbleweed.

“A major update like GCC always take a lot of preparation time and, as it shows in this case, even then some things can slip through,” wrote Dominique Leuenberger is an email to the openSUSE Factory Mailing List, which people who use openSUSE Tumbleweed should subscribe. Luckily, no damage was done to any system in the wild yet.”

The snapshot did expose a graphical glitch with Mozilla Thunderbird has since been fixed.

GCC 7 contains a number of enhancements that help detect buffer overflow and other forms of invalid memory accesses, according to its change log. Position Independent Executables was also enabled by default together with the switch to GCC7.

Snapshot 20170529 also brought a major version change to mono-core (version 5.0), which is an open source, cross platform .NET framework based on the ECMA standards for C# and the Common Language Runtime. Another major version change was made to xfce4-panel-plugin-mount, which updated from version 0.6.4 to version 1.1.2; the newer version offers various bugfixes, feature enhancements and port to GTK3. Two other major version changes also came in the snapshot with icu 59.1 and the advanced power management tool tlp 1.0.

(more…)

Xfce and openSUSE – Five Steps to Perfection

January 12th, 2015 by

Hi there, geekos!

You’ve probably read about openSUSE being touted as a “king of KDE distros”, with reviewers and journalists emphasizing the projects commitment to a unique KDE experience. There also seems to be a little more buzz concerning GNOME, since its 3.14 iteration – I, personally, haven’t read so many praises for the GNOME project since the Gnome 3 Shell introduction some threeish years ago. Also, the 13.2 version has seen the addition of MATE desktop. But, alongside the two big players and a somewhat nostalgic emerging project, we have the crowd’s favorite little big project – Xfce. So, how does the mouse compare to the sole and the dragon?

(more…)