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Make Room on the Runway: openSUSE Conference 2014 Program Ready

April 18th, 2014 by

Register now!We are happy to announce that at long last the schedule for oSC14 has landed and you can find the details of the once again jam packed conference here. We already published a extended sneak peek as well as information on the keynote by Michael Meeks. (more…)

What’s up on KDE repositories

April 4th, 2014 by

Dear KDE Users,

Maybe you have heard already about it from another openSUSE mailing list, a blog post or through our openSUSE community page on Google+, but the KDE repositories have been changed since last Tuesday. Below you will find the changes that were done based on the release of KDE 4.12.4.

Why was this changes needed

Based on a small discussion in the opensuse-kde mailinglist and feedback on our survey, we concluded that the majority is in favor of creating a single repository where we track the current KDE release.

Where are my old KDE repositories

The name for this repository will be KDE:Current and will initially be build for oS 12.3 and oS 13.1.

After the release of the KDE:Current repo, the repositories KDE:Release:XY have been cleaned and removed. Initially KDE:Current will be delivered with 4.12.4 as that the KDE 4.13 release is scheduled for mid April.

Also the repository KDE:Extra and KDE:Unstable:Extra will change as that some of the building targets (KDE:Release:XY) are disappearing and be replaced with KDE:Current.

Where should I find the new KDE repositories

The KDE Repository page KDE repositories has been updated to reflect the changes. We would like to ask those that have been working on the localization of this page in other languages, to
update their pages as well.

Regards,

Raymond

The new generation of openQA hits the production server

April 4th, 2014 by

Bad news for the bugs: the new version of openQA is ready for prime time. Everybody following the blog of the openSUSE Team @ SUSE or the Factory mailing list during the last months, should be aware of the ongoing work to improve openQA and to promote it into a key component of the openSUSE integration process. Finally the new openQA is ready for public production environments, so thanks to the collaboration between the openSUSE Team and the original developers of openQA -Bernhard M. Wiedemann and Dominik Heidler- it’s finally deployed and accessible at openqa.opensuse.org

This new version brings a lot of changes at many levels, but probably the most relevant difference is the approach for tests execution: instead of running every step sequentially and comparing the needles at the end, the new version evaluates the status several times per test, deciding what to do next based on that status or aborting the whole tests as soon as a critical error is found. This approach enables both a better usage of the resources and more precise results.

This enhanced control of the execution and the results, alongside other improvements, makes possible to extend the scope of openQA. Tests of Factory isos are still there and running. But apart from them, you can see test results for the so called "staging projects", used to merge potentially dangerous packages. Generally speaking, you can just browse the test results and see what state is Factory in and how dramatic changes are about to happen.

Fuzzy matching in action: ignoring the floppy icon

Another main new feature is the use of fuzzy area matching for interpreting test results. That means much less false positives. Tests do not break that often and that easily. There is also a nice interface to figure out what failed. Try going to some failed test, selecting a needle and dragging the vertical yellow line. Pretty neat, isn’t it? You can also check how the test is written and what is it looking for. Feel free to play with it, enhance the current tests and needles and submit them via GitHub ;-)

There are even more changes, not directed towards users, but improvements in the interface that service operators use to set things up, including users management, job control or a new REST-like API. These will not affect most of you directly, just indirectly by making operators job easier.

So go ahead, play with it and if you want to help, sources are on github and we even have some easy hacks in progress.o.o to ease you into the development ;-)

FreeDesktop Summit about to start

March 27th, 2014 by

Next week, from Monday the 31st of March to the 4th of April, developers from the major Linux Desktops (GNOME, KDE, Unity and RazorQt) will meet again in Nuremberg for the second FreeDesktop Summit.

The summit is a joint technical meeting from developers working on ‘desktop infrastructure’ on the major Free Desktop projects and the event aims to improve collaboration between the projects by discussing specifications and the sharing of platform-level components.

Like last year, the event is supported by SUSE, which is offering the venue, the hotels and some help with organization.

Check the report from last year to get an idea of what this event is about.

Development for 13.2 Kicks Off

March 19th, 2014 by

openSUSE Factory development is going steady and our venerable release manager has made a first milestone available. No development schedule has yet been determined, although it has been decided that we will aim for a release in November of this year. Major changes include X, Y and Z.
oSC14 banner

Release Plans

Our normal 8-month release cycle would warrant a release in July, but the openSUSE team has proposed to change the schedule due to the work they are doing on our tooling and infrastructure. In the discussions on our mailing list it became clear a November release has much support. This is now the tentative plan and we will decide the specific schedule as well as who’s gonna do what and where at the upcoming openSUSE Conference in Dubrovnik.

Meanwhile, the openSUSE team is asking for feedback, bug hunting and fixing of the new-and-improved openQA and Staging tools for the Open Build Service.

Changes in the first milestone

Although we’re just at the start of our release cycle, this milestone already introduces a number of significant changes. Plans on what exactly will be included will be created at oSC14 next month.

  • The btrfs filesystem is default (and comes with btrfsprogs 3.12), as is the wicked network management tool (replacing ifup) and the dracut initrd replacement
  • YaST sports a new look and its Qt front-end is ported to Qt5
  • Zypper is at the 1.10.x branch for the next release, introducing a number of bug fixes and minor improvements
  • KDE Frameworks 5 packages are included, as well as the latest Application and Platform releases in the 4.x series
  • Our infrastructure is updated: rpm 4.11.2 introduces weak dependencies, PackageKit 0.8.16 comes with a new appdata format and there are binutils .24, Bluez 5.15, systemd 210, pulseaudio at 5.0 and the latest 3.14RC kernel
  • In the graphics area we now have packages for wayland 1.4, freetype 2.5.2 (changing font weights) and Mesa 10.1
  • Cloud and databases bring xen 4.4, virtualbox 4.3.8 and postgresql 9.3.
  • For developers we’ve included GCC 4.9 (default still 4.8.2), make 4.0, llvm 3.4, cmake 3.0(rc), gdb 7.7, git 1.9.0 and subversion 1.8.8
  • In the language area, we’ve now got ruby 2.1, php5 5.5.9 and python 2.7.6 and 3.4.0(rc)

Getting and playing

You can get the milestone as usual on software.opensuse.org/developer. You can get involved in development discussions on the factory mailing list (subscribe).

Have a lot of fun!

oSC14 Keynote Confirmed, More Awesome Coming

March 5th, 2014 by

oSC14 Logo_FinalWe are very pleased to announce Michael Meeks as our keynote speaker for the Saturday opening session at oSC14, held in Dubrovnik April 25th – 28th, 2014. Besides Michael Meeks, the openSUSE board will talk, opening the event on Friday and over 20 of the 60 currently submitted talks have already been accepted. Last but not least, we’d like to tell you that the deadline for the Call for Papers has been extended until the end of this month. (more…)

openSUSE participates in GSoC 2014

March 4th, 2014 by

GSoC 2014: First Steps

openSUSE is part of yet another Google Summer of Code. After a rocking ride in last year’s edition, our Geeko’s are gearing up for another awesome program. This year promises to be more special, as Google is celebrating its 10th anniversary of the program.

About the Program:

Google Summer of Code (commonly called as GSoC) is an annual program conducted by Google which pays students code to write code for open source organizations. It is one of the most best ways for organizations such as openSUSE to get some quality work done, and gain long term contributors. In the last edition, we had 10 students complete their projects and gain recognition within the community.

openSUSE and GSoC:

Last year, we collaborated with ownCloud, Balabit(makers of syslog-ng) and Hedgewars under a common umbrella. It worked very well for all of us. This year, we are collaborating with ownCloud, Zorp(a Gateway technology by Balabit) and the MATE desktop along with the bucket load of awesome projects from openSUSE itself. Our mentors are quite enthusiastic, and recognize the role played by GSoC in moving the community forward.

For Students:

If you are a student who wants to participate under openSUSE, and ‘have a lot of fun’, do check out our ideas page and guidelines. As always, the key is to start early and to interact with mentors and the community at large. Fixing bugs and working on Proof of Concepts is a good way to start.

Student application period opens on 10th March, and continues till March 21.

Contact:

You can find out all about our GSoC programme on the wiki or contact the GSoC team for further questions
Manu Gupta
Saurabh Sood

You can reach the community at our Mailing List and on #opensuse-project on IRC (Freenode).

This article has been contributed by Saurabh Sood

openSUSE Board F2F Meeting

February 25th, 2014 by

The openSUSE Board has pleasure to announce the minutes from Face to Face Board meeting that happened in February 7th to 9th, 2014 in Nuremberg.

Please read carefully and see how it was productive.

http://en.opensuse.org/openSUSE:Board_meeting#Face_to_Face_Meeting_2014-02-07.2C08.2C09

Thanks to SUSE for hosting the meeting and thanks to those meeting with the board over the weekend for taking the time.

Meet_The_Board
There are plenty of opportunities to help the project. The booth boxes are right around the corner and with this a reboot of the advocate and local coordinator effort.

We have also reach agreement to re-instate the reimbursement of locally produced materials. We’ll create some guidelines and a new team needs to be formed. We hope that with some modification to the TSP app both reimbursement streams can be handled in a similar way.

 

 
We all feel we got a lot of stuff sorted out and ready to roll. As always if you have questions or concerns please feel free to send a message to board at o.o

Another good reference can be find here  http://andrew.wafaa.eu/2014/02/19/opensuse-board-in-the-flesh.html

Have a great week!

The openSUSE Board

oSC14 – The openSUSE Travel Support is open!

February 24th, 2014 by

oSC14 Logo_Final

The openSUSE Conference 2014 will happen in Dubrovnic, Croatia. The TSP goal is to help everybody in and around openSUSE to be able to come to the openSUSE Conference! You don’t have to be one of the top 10 packagers to apply – if you’re translating, building a local community or helping out at the forums, we might still be able to offer you some support, so apply!


When and how
The application period started February 20th and closes on February 28th.  All requests will be managed through our application at http://connect.opensuse.org/travel-support.

You will need an openSUSE Connect account in order to log in and apply for sponsorship.

A few reminders

- Please, read the Travel Support wiki page http://en.opensuse.org/openSUSE:Travel_Support_Program carefully
before you apply. We want everybody to be there! Even if you think you would not qualify for travel support, just submit a request! If you don’t ask we can’t help you!

- The Travel Committee can reimburse up to 80% of travel and/or lodging costs. That includes plane ticket, train or bus tickets, even car gas on some occasions, and/or hotel/hostel costs.

Remember: Food and all local expenses are on you!

- The Travel Team won’t be able to book or pay anything in advance, reimbursement comes after the event is over, based on your receipts expenses. Again: no receipts = no money – it’s the rule!

- Those sponsored by the Travel Support Team will be welcomed to write a blog or report about the event.

- The TSP expects the sponsored to be available for helping with tasks at the Conference. Please, in any way step in.

- Sponsorship decisions are influenced by the openSUSE history of the requester. Your involvement with openSUSE is really relevant!

- Having an abstract submitted for presentation at the conference is relevant. Note that the CfP ends on February 28th so there is
still time https://conference.opensuse.org/osem/

- If you got support before and complied with all the requirements, this gets you bonus points too.

- The amount requested must be detailed according to your request, like the airport you will be departing from, sharing hotel/hostel rooms, all the costs associated with your trip.

- Try to get the best fare for tickets and lodging. Remember if you are approved at least 20% or more will be paid by you.
Suitcase
Hurry up!

Our goal is to support as many people as possible. We will attempt to send the approvals before March 5th, 2014 then you can start to book.

Remember, the request can not garantee you’ll be sponsored.

The conference is getting close and the deadline for travel support is tight so start searching for flights right now! Set up your openSUSE Connect account and send in a request as soon as possible!

Hope to see you there!

Your Travel Support Team

oSC14 CfP and Registration Open!

January 29th, 2014 by

oSC14 Logo_FinalStarting today, the oSC14 Program Committee is ready to accept your proposals for sessions!We’re also ready to register visitors interested in joining us. Your talk and workshop submissions should be fit in one of the four main tracks: end users, business, community and project, technology and development.

You can submit your abstracts in our conference submission tool. The submission period begins today, 29 January, and closes 28 February. Note that we will start accepting talks before the deadline.
First acceptance emails will be sent 14th February, allowing you to start planning your trip already. And –of course– First come, first served! So, be in time!

The four tracks

The openSUSE conference traditionally has a theme. This year, the theme is: “The Strength to Change“.

Change has been a constant in Free Software. With the rise of mobile devices and the associated operating systems like Android and Chromebooks, we have to adopt as a project. We discussed strategy again on our mailing lists and by the time of the conference, we can hopefully all talk together and come to some conclusions. Change is never easy, but it is important!

Session proposals that connect in a meaningful way with change and strength would be appreciated!

End user track (Geeko Enthusiast):
The user track provides the opportunity for the power users of any application to share their knowledge and share tricks they apply to get the most out of the applications they use. Know of a non-obvious but very useful feature, present it’s usage to fellow Geekos and users in this track. Topics include, but not limited to, applications, desktop environments, multimedia solutions and games.

Business track (Geeko for suits):
The business track provides the opportunity for those that use openSUSE and/or FOSS in their business to describe the unique challenges they face. This includes, but not limited to, issues and solutions of interfacing with regulatory institutions, other business, staff training, and changing technology course.

Community and Project (Geekos around the world):
Sessions in this area should focus on project and community activities,
including, but not limited to, project governance, marketing, artwork and advocate reports. In many cases, this sessions bring a strong sense of unity to the project as a whole as we discuss some of the unique challenges that an Open Source Community confronts. If you have ideas that can help a community be stronger, join this track.

Technology & Development (Geeko tech):
Sessions in this area should focus on system technology and distribution development. Including, but not limited to, software packaging, development/testing/debugging tools/practices/methods. Infrastructure
software, deployment strategies and monitoring. These sessions will help a few of our members gain understanding of the many tools they can use when working in development for the distribution and other exciting projects.

Detailssubmit_paper

We will have four types of sessions:

  • Short talk (30 min)
  • Long Talk (60 min)
  • Lightning Talk (15 min)
  • Workshop (2 – 4 hours)

You can send in proposals until February 28 but the sooner the better as we will start accepting submissions on February 14.

Find our speaker guidelines here. This page also has tips on how to create smashing presentations and we ave some articles about organizing workshops and BoF sessions at this site.

Registration for oSC14

In other great news: registration has opened! That means you can now visit the conference site and register yourself for oSC14.