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Archive for 2017

New KDE Applications, PulseAudio Arrive in Tumbleweed

September 14th, 2017 by

The last openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshot has arrived and brought the newest version of KDE Applications as well as a new PulseAudio version.

KDE Applications 17.08.1 was released in the 20170911 snapshot along with an updated version of GNU Compiler Collection 6. The newest 17.08.1 version included 20 recorded bugfixes with improvements to Gwenview, Kdenlive, Konsole, Okular, KDE games and more. The newer GCC6 version renamed the tarball and source to make factory-auto happy, according to the change log.

Four other snapshots were released since the beginning of last week.

In snapshot 20170909, Mesa 17.2.0 implemented the OpenGL 4.5 Application Programming Interface; the announcement from Mesa suggest that people should stick with the previous version or wait for the 17.2.1 release because of driver support. Users who are blind or visually impaired will be pleased to know that BRLTTY, which drives the braille display and provides complete screen review functionality was updated to version 5.5. Also in the snapshot, the release of iproute2 4.13 brought improvements to the Berkeley Packet Filter (BPF), which provides a raw interface to data link layers and permits raw link-layer packets to be sent and received. (more…)

Are Governments Held Hostage? Why openSUSE Supports Public Money Public Code

September 13th, 2017 by

Public Money? Public Code! from Free Software Foundation Europe on Vimeo.

Europeans can disagree on political issues, but there is one issue the open-source community is bringing to the political spectrum that many citizens can find agreement about; publicly funded software has to be Free and Open Source Software.

“Public institutions spend millions of euros each year on the development of new software tailored to their needs,” according to a release from the non-profit advocacy group Free Software Foundation Europe. “The procurement choices of the public sector play a significant role in determining which companies are allowed to compete and what software is supported with tax payers’ money.

To bring awareness to this issue, FSFE started the “Public Money Public Code” campaign at https://publiccode.eu, which was originally revealed by Matthias Kirschner during the keynote at the openSUSE Conference, and the openSUSE Project encourages all its members and open source enthusiasts to sign the open letter addressed to European politicians about this important public issue. This can also be achieved with the sharing of videos on the topic.

There are many reasons for why code of publicly-funded software projects should be freely available for people to study, develop, enhance and use.

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Catching up with Tumbleweed Snapshots

August 24th, 2017 by

The last review readers received about openSUSE Tumbleweed was a while ago, so it’s time to catch up on the new packages available for the rolling release.

Release manager Dominique Leuenberger gave subscribers of the openSUSE Factory Mailing List a nice review of 11 snapshots from July 28 to August 16 in his Review of the weeks 2017/31 – 33 email.

In the email, Leuenberger lists LibreOffice 5.4.0.3, KDE Applications 17.04.3, git 2.14.0 and systemd 234 as all being available in the Tumbleweed repositories. PulseAudio 11 RC1 and Mozilla Firefox 52.3.0 also were updated in the snapshots between the same period.

Flatpak was reverted to the 0.8.x branch in order to provide better upgrade options in short term,” he wrote in the email.

There have been considerable challenges getting the 4.12 Linux Kernel in Tumbleweed, but Kernel 4.12.7 finally made it into Tumbleweed’s 20170817 snapshot and Kernel 4.12.8 passed openQA testing to finds its way into the  20170819 snapshot a couple days later.

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openSUSE Leap 42.3 Cloud Images Become Available

August 22nd, 2017 by

Cloud images for openSUSE Leap 42.3 are now available for Azure, Google Compute Engine and more cloud providers.

The images for Amazon Web Services (AWS EC2) are expected to arrive soon as they were recently submitted for review by the AWS Marketplace team.

“Compared to openSUSE Leap 42.2 we were in much better shape releasing two of three images on release date (GCE and Azure) and even the delayed image was released much closer to release date than the 42.2 release,” Robert Schweikert wrote on Google Plus.

End users can choose the cloud service provider that best fits their usage model.

Leap ships with tools for uploading and managing images. The tools allow for uploading, publishing, deleting and deprecating images.

There are a couple of known things not working at the moment like the “gcloud” command in the GCE image and the automatic hostname setting in the GCE image,

Both will be worked on as time permits, Schweikert wrote.

Cloud images of openSUSE have been available in for years and users can run Docker containers in a Virtual Machine with openSUSE’s cloud image; this has been tested with SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12, which shares a common core with openSUSE Leap.

Since releasing openSUSE Leap 42.2 in the AWS Marketplace, around mid January, roughly 220 subscribers are running openSUSE Leap. AWS customers have an opportunity to use openSUSE’s community software on AWS without any hourly-software instance charge.

openSUSE.Asia Summit 2017: Call for Sponsorships

July 28th, 2017 by

The openSUSE.Asia Committee is seeking sponsors for the fourth edition of openSUSE.Asia Summit. The summit will take place in Tokyo, Japan, from Oct. 21– 22, 2017. With more than 100 attendees every year, we expect the trend to follow suit. Our attendees are home, power and business users. Sponsorship covers facility and travel costs.

We aim to provide a free platform for users, contributors, and developers. The summit fosters relationships across open source enthusiasts. Attendees take this opportunity to learn about different modern technologies and share their experiences. Sponsorships show your appreciation for our community. It is also a great way to

  • Promote your products in the community.
  • Business can promote their solutions / services to our community and stakeholders through business tracks.
  • Sponsors can promote their products / services through
    • openSUSE.Asia Summit website.
    • Printed materials advertising the event.
    • Summit welcome package.
    • Promotional advertising visible throughout the event location.
    • Other community events that we attend  to promote openSUSE.Asia summit.
    • Sponsors can also request a booth to highlight their products and businesses.

Contact opensuse-asia-17-contact@googlegroups.com no later than 15th of September, 2017. The sponsorship prospectus is available at:

English https://bitbucket.org/ftake/opensuse-asia-17-jp/raw/master/sponsor/call-for-sponsorship-en.pdf

Japanese

https://bitbucket.org/ftake/opensuse-asia-17-jp/raw/master/sponsor/call-for-sponsorship-ja.pdf

Refresh of Linux Distribution Continues Leveraging Community, Enterprise Benefits

July 26th, 2017 by

(Languages: DE, ES, FR, IT, ZH, zh_TW)

openSUSE Leap 42.3 Gives Smooth Desktop and Server UpgradeLeap-green.png

The openSUSE Project released openSUSE Leap 42.3 today bringing the community version more closely aligned with its shared core of SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 12 Service Pack 3.

The mutual packages of both Leap and SLE distributions give seasoned Linux users, systems administrators, and developers even more reason to use the newest chameleon distribution.

Users are advised to take advantage of the seamless upgrade to Leap 42.3. Leap 42.2 reaches its end of maintenance in six months.

“By avoiding major version updates in the base system as well as the desktops, the upgrade to Leap 42.3 is a rather unadventurous matter,” said Ludwig Nussel, openSUSE Leap release manager.

The release of Leap 42.3 provides adopters a reliable server operating system for deploying IT services in physical, virtual or cloud environments.

Leap’s third edition of the 42 series has more than 10,000 packages and offers stability-minded users a refresh and hardware enablement release. The release is powered by the same Linux 4.4 Long-Term-Support (LTS) kernel found in the previous Leap edition.

Leap 42.3 continues to use KDE’s Long-Term-Support release 5.8 as the default desktop selection while also offering GNOME 3.20, the same as used by SUSE Linux Enterprise. A variety of additional desktops is available in the installer through the newly designed desktop selection.

“Leap 42.3 is the culmination of several years of effort integrating SUSE’s Enterprise codebase with the exceptional high-quality work of the openSUSE community,” said Richard Brown, Chairman of the openSUSE Project. “I’m exceptionally proud of what the openSUSE Project has achieved with Leap 42.3 and hope our users appreciate this stable, yet innovative, approach to community Linux, which can really be relied upon to work.”

This release of openSUSE Leap is well suited for servers thanks to its server installation profile and its fully-featured text mode installer, including all the options of YaST without a graphical environment.

System administrators are going to love the backup solution Borg, which now can be used easier than ever thanks to Borgmatic’s wrapper to automatically backup your data daily with a systemd service. Sysadmins will also like Samba’s System Security Services Daemon integration with an Active Directory.

Leap, and the openSUSE project, provides the DevOps tool chain developers need to be successful. Microservices with Leap offer scalability and continuous delivery through the availability of Docker and Kubernetes as well as easy configuration with Salt, Ansible, and other openSUSE technologies. AutoYaST’s new integration with SaltStack and other configuration management systems can take care of the system installation (partitioning, network setup, etc.) and then delegate the system configuration to one of those widely used external tools.

Developers, and businesses can take advantage of extensive core libraries found in Leap 42.3 to build or enhance software for enterprise use. Since Leap and SLE share a common core, development with packages on Leap for use in production on SLE has never been easier. Furthermore, system integrators can develop on Leap with the possibility of getting their work into future SLE releases.

Leap provides the tools, languages and libraries for sustainable software development and engineering. Enterprise ready versions of Python, Ruby, Perl, Go, Rust, Haskell and PHP are all available in Leap.

Updates to the kernel and graphics stack enable more hardware and provide stability and performance improvements.
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openSUSE Heroes Spring Into Action

July 19th, 2017 by

openSUSE-Heroes LogoMike Tyson might have said it best when he said “everyone has a plan ‘till they get punched in the mouth.”

Tyson’s point is that plans change, especially in the moment of executing a plan and that’s exactly what the openSUSE Heroes did with updating the wikis; minus the punch in the mouth.

Yesterday evening the Heroes planned to move and update some of the localized wikis. Things worked better and faster than expected, and in the end, the openSUSE Heroes moved all 18 localized wikis from Provo to Nuremberg and updated them to MediaWiki 1.27.

This means all openSUSE wikis are now running on MediaWiki 1.27 and support the features announced for the English wiki last week.

Christian Boltz, a humble openSUSE Hero with the power to mass migrate wikis, didn’t have time to change the <feed> tags to the new <rss> tags in all the wikis, which he plans to do in the next few days. Boltz did express a challenge to see what other superhuman powers exist.

“I won’t complain if someone is faster and does it in some of the wikis,” Botlz wrote in an email to the openSUSE Project mailing list.

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Plan A Community Release Party for openSUSE Leap 42.3

July 17th, 2017 by

Many people are anxiously awaiting for the release of openSUSE Leap 42.3 next week, but before the release arrives, you can prepare for a Release Party to celebrate the upcoming achievement with members of the open-source and openSUSE community.

Host your own Release Party. If you don’t know how to do this, there is a list of five steps to have a successful release party. Plus more details are listed below on how to have a fantastic party.

Selecting a good date and having some goodies to pass out to the party requires a bit of planning. The checklist below can help with planning the release party. If you plan on having a party, email ddemaio (at) suse.de well before the party to get some goodies to hand out to the party people. Please include “Leap 42.3 Party” in the subject line and include a mailing address and phone number.

checklist:

Find a date

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