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Introducing Kubic Project: a new open-source project

May 29th, 2017 by

Recent years have seen tremendous growth in the container technologies market. From being a non-existent category just a few years ago to being one of the most interesting, fast development and exciting areas.

Containers change the way we think about application architecture and the speed at which we can deliver on business requirements. They provide consistency and portability across environments and allow developers to focus on building a great product, without the distraction of underlying execution details.

Today the entire application delivery supply chain is changing as the age of abstract application creation is upon us. This change is fueled by the adoption of a few key technologies,  including shared code repositories, continuous integration, continuous development, and cloud computing.  However, the ultimate driver of this movement is a software delivery mechanism: containers.

Project Kubic is a generic project for the many new initiatives related to re-designing the operating system around principles of immutable infrastructure and the usage of a stack based on Linux, docker project and Kubernetes.  The primary building block of the Kubic Project is the Container Host OS based on openSUSE Tumbleweed.

In the near future and with your support, we’ll be enabling Kubernetes and many other new features. This will allow you to easily build Container as a Service (CaaS) solutions and run them everywhere…

How can the Kubic Project help me?

  •  Traditional OS are cool and fun to hack on, but the model with a single runtime environment controlled by the OS and shared by all applications does not meet the requirements of modern application-centric IT.
  • Based on a monolithic approach, the traditional OS brings lots of challenges for managing the stacks running on top of it. With Kubic, we would like to rethink the OS by redesigning it for modern IT applications.
  • In agile environments, developers and DevOps engineers are taking responsibilities over their app and seeking control over the runtime underneath their applications, without necessarily owning the entire stack.
  • VMs provide a means for separation among applications, but this model adds resource and management overhead.

Join our Kubic Project and together we will build the next generation of Container OS

Useful information:

(This blog is written by Simona Arsene and was originally published at https://www.suse.com/communities/blog/introducing-kubic-project-new-open-source-project/)

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Conference Talks Uploaded, Stream is Live

May 27th, 2017 by

This year’s openSUSE Conference has so far been a blast and the talks  from Day 1 of the conference have already been uploaded to the openSUSETV YouTube channel.

For the people who couldn’t make it to this year’s conference, they can watch the live stream of the conference at http://streaming.media.ccc.de/osc17/. There are two rooms (Galerie and Saal) being live streamed and recorded.

Starting out the conference, Matthias Kirschner, President of Free Software Foundation Europe, delivered a terrific keynote and gave several thought provoking questions about who will be the torchbearer for open-source software and questioned whether it is necessary to have a torchbearer since there are so many examples of success of open-source software.

Chief Technology Officer and co-founder of SaltStack, Thomas Hatch, gave a great keynote today and yesterday gave a talk about “My Move to SUSE.”

Thorsten Kukuk introduced openSUSE Kubic as a project under the openSUSE Project and Leap release manager Ludwig Nussel touched on the status of Leap; past, present and future.

Another great talk recommended for system administrators and developers from the  open-source community is Wolfgang Engel’s talk about SUSE Package Hub and how SUSE is bringing community packages to enterprise users.

 

Enterprise Beta Sources Added to openSUSE Leap 42.3 Build

May 19th, 2017 by

Sources from the beta version of SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) Service Pack 3 (SP3) arrived today in the latest build for openSUSE’s next minor release of the 42 series.

The transition to a rolling development process for openSUSE Leap 42.3 has changed the traditional milestone process, but fixed milestones are alive and well with SLE development and Leap is benefiting from that hardened, enterprise core.

The latest sources from SLE SP3 Beta included in Leap builds are security and bug fixes n SUSEConnect version 0.3.0. Additionally, cpupower updated to a turbostat version with 17.04.12. The shared zypper 1.13.27 version helps to tag packages installed by user request as ‘i+’. The beta and Leap build also cleanup an algorithm for rollback snapshots with Snapper 0.5.0. Ceph’s  12.0.2 sets higher disk and memory constraints so s390x builds don’t fail. SLE SP3 and Leap also share the same 4.4.68 Linux Kernel, which provides plenty of improvements for architectures and wireless drivers.

Yast2-installation moved Container as a Service Platform to yast2-caasp package and added a features request, which added Network Time Protocol Servers settings to the overview dialog.

Community packages differing from SLE SP 3 Beta that testers can find in Leap are new features from Mozilla Thunderbird 52.1.0 and security fix from Mozilla Firefox 52.1.1. This past week KDE Applications was updated in the Leap builds to version 17.04.0. Two weeks ago, a Leap build for 42.3 updated Mesa from version 11.2.2 to version 17.0.4 (now Mesa 17.0.5), so more Graphics Processing Units are supported.

“I’d like to ask package maintainers and users alike to check whether there are any bigger changes left to be done in 42.3,” release manager Ludwig Nussel wrote to the openSUSE Factory Mailing List. “If so, please submit affected packages ASAP.”

There are only a few more days left to get any major version updates in the next minor Leap 42 version. All major version updates have a submission deadline of May 21.

Leap 42.3 builds have been coming out on a regular basis with new community packages being updated in the newest builds. Testers are encouraged to test the rolling development and can download the iso image from the development button on software.opensuse.org. After installing Leap, testers can enter the terminal and enter zypper update for the newest Leap 42.3 packages.

Don’t forget to report bugs if you find one.

Kernel 4.11 Arrives in openSUSE Tumbleweed

May 18th, 2017 by

Multiple small pattern changes had momentarily slowed the releases of openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots, but snapshots are expected to come more frequently moving forward.

The newest snapshot, 20170516, brought Linux Kernel 4.11 and tons of new fixes and features. The new kernel has at least eight prominent features and a pluggable IO scheduler for the multiqueue block layer is just one of the many features. There are some fixes for nvidia drivers in the 4.11.1 Kernel, which expected to arrive in the next Tumbleweed snapshot if all goes according to plan.

The snapshot also delivered an update for python-requests with version 2.13.0, which has multiple fixes including fixing an issue with JSON encoding detection. Python-sip 4.19.2 provided a fix for a crash and power-device supporter nut 2.7.4 changed some command and variable naming schemes as well as added a new class of device support for Automatic Transfer Switch.

KDE Applications 17.04.0 made it’s way into the 20170516 and 20170510 snapshots. Among the many improvements are 3D rendering with KAlgebra, more stability for the video editor Kdenlive and a new version of Minuet, which will helps teach and learn music, offers more exercises and ear-learning tasks. (more…)

Announcing openSUSE’s status page – status.opensuse.org

May 10th, 2017 by
Screenshot Status Page

Screenshot https://status.opensuse.org/

Worried about downtimes and maintenance windows of openSUSE services that you missed because there was no information provided? ;-)

Now is your chance to get informed about any (un-)expected downtime of any openSUSE service!

The openSUSE Heroes team is pleased to announce that status.opensuse.org is up and running as public status page, providing you with the latest updates about our infrastructure.  We tried our best to get the page mobile friendly and easy to understand. Even RSS and Atom feeds are available. A big “thank you” to the team from Cachet, the open source status page system, for developing that great tool.

You wonder where this status page get’s it’s information from?

For the moment, the Heroes will update the page manually with information – until our new monitoring system is up and running and can take over some parts of the job. Thanks to a nice API, updates and status queries can be done even via command line (and therefor integrated in whatever tool you can imagine). But as we want to provide you with the best information available, we might still use a “human form” instead of automatism. Let’s see what the future brings and how familiar we will get with the tool…

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Students to Enhance Multiple Open Source Projects

May 9th, 2017 by

Five students will spend this summer putting their coding skills into practice for openSUSE and other projects during this year’s Google Summer of Code.

The international program that matches mentors and students funded 1,315 student projects this year for 201 open source organizations, who will benefit from the active involvement from these new developers.

“We are excited to be selected as a mentoring organization and to mentor these talented, young GSoC students,” said Christian Bruckmayer, one of the openSUSE mentors. “This year’s projects focus on enhancing the capabilities of our open source tools, so that the benefits are shared amongst the open-source ecosystem.”

The student proposals selected this year regarding openSUSE mentoring will help not only the openSUSE Project, but multiple other open-source projects like KDE and the Free and Open Source Software Developers’ European Meeting (FOSDEM) as well as many others.

In addition to the two student proposals selected for openSUSE’s Open Source Event Management project, which is a self hosted solution to organize conferences, two other students will be developing implementations on OSEM for FOSDEM.

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Excited about oSC17? Volunteer to experience another aspect of it!

May 8th, 2017 by

oSC17 is just around the corner, and if you want to be part of making it awesome you can now sign up to become a volunteer!

Volunteers are invaluable to conferences, and they play a major role in creating a pleasant conference atmosphere for attendees.

We need volunteers to help out with various things throughout the conference, such as:

  • Help at the registration desk, which involves:
    • welcoming people at the conference and marking them as attended
    • help people find what they are looking for (rooms, toilet, bus stop, etc.)
    • assist people with the schedule, and direct them to the next available session (keynote, workshop, etc)
    • provide people with a t-shirt and urge them to put on a name tag
    • handle incidents that might come up
  • Help with speakers by making sure that:
    • speakers know where they need to be before their talk
    • there is a bottle of water and glasses at the speaker desk
    • speakers upload their presentation and make the link public in OSEM
  • Help setup everything on Friday morning, and tear down on Sunday evening

Volunteers will receive an instructions sheet, as well as a short briefing. Please be available at the registration desk 15-30 minutes prior to the time you are scheduled to volunteer.

Make sure to fill out the volunteers form, so that we know we can count on your help!

See you soon at oSC17, 26-28 May 2017!

GNOME 3.24.1, Plasma 5.9.5 Arrive in Tumbleweed

May 5th, 2017 by

A total of seven openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots were released since last week’s update, which brought several minor version updates and less than a handful of major version updates.

A change on the server that prepares the .diff emails that are generated caused a hiccup for the Tumbleweed announcer, so snapshots 20170428, 20170429, 20170430 and 20170502 were all listed in snapshots 20170503. The change to the server was to create a similar data comparison file to generate emails for Leap 42.3, so it could list packages that are changed during its rolling development process.

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Tumbleweed Snapshots Update Fonts, Perl, Python Packages

April 27th, 2017 by

openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots this week gave many newer versions of Perl and Python packages, but several other packages were updated in the repositories including some open fonts.

Google and Adobe fonts were updated in snapshots 20170424 and 20170420 with google-croscore-fonts and adobe-sourcehansans-fonts being added to the repositories respectively.

Besides the google-croscore-fonts in snapshots 20170424, users can get a fix for the CD/DVD burning software Brasero, which provided a patch for Grub2 that fixes builds with the GNU Composite Compilers, and kdebase4-workspace offers a diff to fix an error reported by GCC7, which should be helpful as Tumbleweed works closer to adapt the newest GCC. The snapshot also delivered a patch for VirtualBox that will provide an eventual Application Programming Interface change for the release of Leap 42.3. (more…)

Samba, Ceph, LightDM Update in Tumbleweed Snapshots

April 20th, 2017 by

Snapshots released the past two weeks of openSUSE Tumbleweed have slowed down a bit, but new software continues to be updated in the five snapshots that have been release since April 6.

The most recent snapshot, 20170417, brought Samba 4.6.2, which had an enormous amount of bug fixes and addressed regression issues introduced by the security fixes for CVE-2017-2619. gPhoto had lots of improvements thanks to the update to libgphoto2 2.5.13. The snapshot also updated ethtool to version 4.10, which synchronized the utility used for displaying and modifying some parameters of network interface controllers with the upstream release, and yast2-fonts’ 3.2.0 version fixed regression introduced in version 3.1.17 and added UTF-8 encoding to Ruby strings.

Snapshot 20170414  provided the 3.5.25 version of squid in the repositories, which fixed aspects involved with data connections and FTP traffic intercepts, and yast2-dhcp-server’s 3.2.2 version fixed a crash happens with the latest yast2-core and yast2-ruby-bindings packages. The premier library for Internationalization Components for Unicode (ICU), which provides globalized support for software applications, was updated to version  58.2 and fixed some issues for Cantonese, Greek and Arabic users as well as updated Emoji characters and 19 new symbols for the new 4K TV standard.

Mozilla Firefox fixed a startup crash on Linux with it’s 52.0.2 release in Tumbleweed’s 20170413 snapshot and the Linux Kernel was updated to version 4.10.9. Linux Kernel initiator open-iscsi had a large amount of patch removals and additions. The btrfs file system matured even more with the release of version 4.10.2. The suite and art application Calligra received a fix for crash when using arrow keys in version 3.0.1 and it’s Flow chart added undo commands. The snapshot also merged upstream Ceph fixes for the codestream. WindowMaker 0.95.8 added some patches and new features for veteran users. (more…)