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Plasma 5.11, GNOME 3.26.1 Land in Tumbleweed

October 12th, 2017 by

The week has been pretty exciting for desktop enthusiast running openSUSE Tumbleweed since two of this week’s snapshots delivered new versions of GNOME and KDE respectively.

Snapshot 20171010, which is the most recent release, fixed numerous memory leaks with ImageMagick 7.0.7.6 and apache 2.4.28 fixed Optionsbleed or Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE)-2017-9798, which allows remote attackers to read secret data from process memory. Cmake 3.9.4 added support for Boost 1.65.0 and 1.65.1 and hplip 3.17.9 added support for several new printers. New features were added for the Quick Emulator (QEMU) with the new libvirt 3.8.0 version. Two major version updates were also available in the snapshot; some targets may rebuild when upgrading with the software construction tool SCons 3.0.0 and the memory allocator Jemalloc 5.0.1 added several improvements and new features including the addition of mutex profiling, which collects a variety of statistics useful for diagnosing overhead/contention issues.

Tumbleweed KDE users saw Plasma 5.11 make its way into snapshot 20171009 less than 24 hours after the official upstream release. The new Plasma 5.11 brings a redesigned settings app, improved notifications and a more powerful task manager. The release is the first release to contain the new “Vault”, a system to allow the user to encrypt and open sets of documents in a secure and user-friendly way.    Several CVE fixes were made with the update of Mozilla Firefox 56.0, but users should be aware that Firefox has no 32-bit builds for the application. The Linux Kernel was also upgraded to version 4.13.5 in the snapshot.

Several libraries and XFCE plugins were updated in the 20171007 snapshot and Mesa 17.2.2 had several Vulkan ANV/RADV driver fixes. Support for LLVM 5.0 for the Gallium3D architecture when using SCons was also added with the new Mesa version. YaST 4.0.10 fixed the handling of Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) signatures when running in insecure mode. (more…)

Special Edition Highlights openSUSE, KDE

October 11th, 2017 by

Getting the masses to move to a Linux distribution can be challenging, but the openSUSE Project is doing its part to get people started with open-source software.

Members of the openSUSE community recently worked with Linux Magazine to publish a special edition of a Getting Started With Linux magazine with the purpose of increasing the openSUSE user base and teaching beginners how to make the switch to Linux.

The 100-page special edition focuses on installing openSUSE Leap 42.3, using the installation and configuration tool YaST, understanding security and many other topics specific for Linux beginners.

It also provides a crash course on Linux and goes in depth about the several applications available on Linux distributions and openSUSE’s default desktop selection, which currently is KDE’s Long Term Support version Plasma 5.8. Many of the articles written in the magazine are from community members of both openSUSE and KDE among others.

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Refresh of Linux Distribution Continues Leveraging Community, Enterprise Benefits

July 26th, 2017 by

(Languages: DE, ES, FR, IT, ZH, zh_TW)

openSUSE Leap 42.3 Gives Smooth Desktop and Server UpgradeLeap-green.png

The openSUSE Project released openSUSE Leap 42.3 today bringing the community version more closely aligned with its shared core of SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 12 Service Pack 3.

The mutual packages of both Leap and SLE distributions give seasoned Linux users, systems administrators, and developers even more reason to use the newest chameleon distribution.

Users are advised to take advantage of the seamless upgrade to Leap 42.3. Leap 42.2 reaches its end of maintenance in six months.

“By avoiding major version updates in the base system as well as the desktops, the upgrade to Leap 42.3 is a rather unadventurous matter,” said Ludwig Nussel, openSUSE Leap release manager.

The release of Leap 42.3 provides adopters a reliable server operating system for deploying IT services in physical, virtual or cloud environments.

Leap’s third edition of the 42 series has more than 10,000 packages and offers stability-minded users a refresh and hardware enablement release. The release is powered by the same Linux 4.4 Long-Term-Support (LTS) kernel found in the previous Leap edition.

Leap 42.3 continues to use KDE’s Long-Term-Support release 5.8 as the default desktop selection while also offering GNOME 3.20, the same as used by SUSE Linux Enterprise. A variety of additional desktops is available in the installer through the newly designed desktop selection.

“Leap 42.3 is the culmination of several years of effort integrating SUSE’s Enterprise codebase with the exceptional high-quality work of the openSUSE community,” said Richard Brown, Chairman of the openSUSE Project. “I’m exceptionally proud of what the openSUSE Project has achieved with Leap 42.3 and hope our users appreciate this stable, yet innovative, approach to community Linux, which can really be relied upon to work.”

This release of openSUSE Leap is well suited for servers thanks to its server installation profile and its fully-featured text mode installer, including all the options of YaST without a graphical environment.

System administrators are going to love the backup solution Borg, which now can be used easier than ever thanks to Borgmatic’s wrapper to automatically backup your data daily with a systemd service. Sysadmins will also like Samba’s System Security Services Daemon integration with an Active Directory.

Leap, and the openSUSE project, provides the DevOps tool chain developers need to be successful. Microservices with Leap offer scalability and continuous delivery through the availability of Docker and Kubernetes as well as easy configuration with Salt, Ansible, and other openSUSE technologies. AutoYaST’s new integration with SaltStack and other configuration management systems can take care of the system installation (partitioning, network setup, etc.) and then delegate the system configuration to one of those widely used external tools.

Developers, and businesses can take advantage of extensive core libraries found in Leap 42.3 to build or enhance software for enterprise use. Since Leap and SLE share a common core, development with packages on Leap for use in production on SLE has never been easier. Furthermore, system integrators can develop on Leap with the possibility of getting their work into future SLE releases.

Leap provides the tools, languages and libraries for sustainable software development and engineering. Enterprise ready versions of Python, Ruby, Perl, Go, Rust, Haskell and PHP are all available in Leap.

Updates to the kernel and graphics stack enable more hardware and provide stability and performance improvements.
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GNOME 3.24.1, Plasma 5.9.5 Arrive in Tumbleweed

May 5th, 2017 by

A total of seven openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots were released since last week’s update, which brought several minor version updates and less than a handful of major version updates.

A change on the server that prepares the .diff emails that are generated caused a hiccup for the Tumbleweed announcer, so snapshots 20170428, 20170429, 20170430 and 20170502 were all listed in snapshots 20170503. The change to the server was to create a similar data comparison file to generate emails for Leap 42.3, so it could list packages that are changed during its rolling development process.

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Samba, Ceph, LightDM Update in Tumbleweed Snapshots

April 20th, 2017 by

Snapshots released the past two weeks of openSUSE Tumbleweed have slowed down a bit, but new software continues to be updated in the five snapshots that have been release since April 6.

The most recent snapshot, 20170417, brought Samba 4.6.2, which had an enormous amount of bug fixes and addressed regression issues introduced by the security fixes for CVE-2017-2619. gPhoto had lots of improvements thanks to the update to libgphoto2 2.5.13. The snapshot also updated ethtool to version 4.10, which synchronized the utility used for displaying and modifying some parameters of network interface controllers with the upstream release, and yast2-fonts’ 3.2.0 version fixed regression introduced in version 3.1.17 and added UTF-8 encoding to Ruby strings.

Snapshot 20170414  provided the 3.5.25 version of squid in the repositories, which fixed aspects involved with data connections and FTP traffic intercepts, and yast2-dhcp-server’s 3.2.2 version fixed a crash happens with the latest yast2-core and yast2-ruby-bindings packages. The premier library for Internationalization Components for Unicode (ICU), which provides globalized support for software applications, was updated to version  58.2 and fixed some issues for Cantonese, Greek and Arabic users as well as updated Emoji characters and 19 new symbols for the new 4K TV standard.

Mozilla Firefox fixed a startup crash on Linux with it’s 52.0.2 release in Tumbleweed’s 20170413 snapshot and the Linux Kernel was updated to version 4.10.9. Linux Kernel initiator open-iscsi had a large amount of patch removals and additions. The btrfs file system matured even more with the release of version 4.10.2. The suite and art application Calligra received a fix for crash when using arrow keys in version 3.0.1 and it’s Flow chart added undo commands. The snapshot also merged upstream Ceph fixes for the codestream. WindowMaker 0.95.8 added some patches and new features for veteran users. (more…)

Newest GNOME, KDE, Kernel Arrive in Tumbleweed

April 6th, 2017 by

Eighteen openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots brought several new packages to users last month, which included both  GNOME 3.24 and KDE Plasma 5.9.4.

GNOME 3.24 received most of the hype in snapshot 20170322, but that release also included Mozilla Firefox’s newest 52.0.1 version, which added support for WebAssembly, an emerging standard that brings near-native performance to Web-based games, apps, and software libraries without the use of plugins.

Closing out the month, snapshot 20170331 brought git 2.12.2 that provided a Command Line Interface output fix and python 3.6.1, which provided some bug fixes and updates to documentation. Ruby 2.2 switched to git-branch based patching and patched an exploitable heap overflow vulnerability for CVE-2016-2339. (more…)

Tumbleweed Gets 4.8.10 Kernel, Updates for Virtualbox, VIM

December 1st, 2016 by

dotsgeeko1November brought openSUSE Tumbleweed users an early holiday gift with 24 snapshots of new software and four updated Linux Kernels.

The continuous snapshot streak of Tumbleweed updates ended with snapshot 20161123, which brought Kernel 4.8.10.

More updates were in the 20161123 snapshot such as updates of yast2-storage to version 3.2.1 and Yast2-bootloader to version 3.2.10.

The streak-breaking snapshot, 20161125, brought several goodies like GTK 3.22.4, which saw Wayland patch dropped due to a fix upstream, and an update to KDE’s Plasma 5.8.4, which included several small but important bug fixes.

Oracle’s Virtualbox updated to 5.1.10 in the 20161125 snapshot and provided fixes for various issues to improve the graphical user interface. ImageMagick’s updates to version 6.9.6.5 provided a fix to improve data compression decoding. Web browser Epiphany added the missing F1 keyboard shortcut to open help with an update in Tumbleweed to version 3.22.3.

Updates found in the repositories with the 20161128 snapshot added some upstream patches for Bash and Wine updated winetricks in version 1.9.24.

Snapshot 20161122 updated Mozilla Thunderbird to 45.5 and advanced text editor Vim to 8.0.92.

Tumbleweed brings Halloween Treats

November 3rd, 2016 by

A new framework for desktop applications on Linux has been added to Tumbleweed and now users can enjoy the most up-to-date version of Flatpak.

Flatpak 0.6.13 arrived in the 20161028 snapshot  last week and complements another package updated in the snapshot; OSTree 2016.12, which is a tool that combines a “git-like” model for committing and downloading bootable filesystem trees, along with a layer for deploying them and managing the bootloader configuration.

The “new feature will surely need some testing,” wrote Dominique Leuenberger, in his weekly review about Tumbleweed to the Factory Mailing List.

Snapshot 20161028 also provided several updated packages in the repositories including Mozilla Firefox 49.0.2 and Frameworks 5.27.0, which provides new mimetypes icons in the version.

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Beta 3 Release Updates FireFox, KDE Applications, VirtualBox

October 5th, 2016 by

The openSUSE Leap 42.2 Beta 3 was released today one day ahead of schedule and the last beta for 42.2 brought quite a few new versions for people to test.

VirtualBox was upgraded from version 5.0.24 in Beta 2 to version 5.1.4 and there were an enormous amount of fixes applied to this newer version, which was released in August.

KDE’s Plasma moved from its 5.7.95 beta version in Leap’s Beta 2 to version 5.8.0 in the Beta 3. Plasma 5.8 is new but the purpose of openSUSE Leap is to have well established packages and since Plasma 5.8 is a Long Term Support release, it made sense to have 5.8 in the distribution event though it is very new. Plasma 5.8 will be supported for 18 months, according to KDE’s release team. KDE Applications also have an update in the Beta 3 to version 16.08.1, which unifies the look of KDE and enhance the effects for users.

Firefox 49 was added to the Beta 3. Thunderbird’s has some security and edit fixes with version 45.3.0. Also in the new beta, YaST had storage and ruby updates and there was an installation fix for module crash in the newest yast2-installation 3.1.216 version.

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Ceph, Git, YaST, kernel update in Tumbleweed

August 24th, 2016 by

openSUSE Tumbleweed had another abundant week of snapshots.

Four Tumbleweed snapshots were released since the last article and the snapshot of the week, 20160816, brought users a new version of gtk3 (3.20.8). Updated in the repositories for this snapshot was an updated version of yast2-auth-client (3.3.10). Cairo graphics fixed several bugs and Apache2 removed the omc xml config because the change log states it is “useless nowdays.”

Snapshot 20160817 has several updates for the scalable storage platform ceph, which added an ability to reduce the constraints on resources required to build ceph and ceph-test packages. Git updated to version 2.9.3 and glib2 had several subpackages updated as did gnome-desktop. This snapshot caused quite a bit of chatter on the openSUSE Factory mailing list and serves as a reminder for people using openSUSE Tumbleweed to subscribed to the mailing list so they are aware of the updates.

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