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Mesa updates in Tumbleweed, OpenSSL security issue fixed

December 17th, 2015 by

Tumbleweed-black-greenTumbleweed had two snapshot this week and Mesa updated two new minor versions since Saturday’s 20151209 snapshot.

The biggest package update for the week was to autofs in the 20151214 snapshot. Autofs, which is a program for automatically mounting directories, had several fixes and upstream patches.

Libraries for the Qt Cryptographic Architecture, libqca2, updated from version 2.0.3 to 2.1.1. There were several Perl updates, and Python-Cryptography updated to 1.1 and fixed an OpenSSL security issue reported by Emilia Käsper from the Google Security Team.

Other packages updated in the Tumbleweed snapshots were Mozilla Thunderbird updated to 38.4, Gimp updated to version 2.8.16 and Squid had a major version update to 4.0.3.

Plasma 5.5 is going through staging and users of Tumbleweed might see the update in an upcoming snapshot. However, systemd and the Kernel are blocked due to some issues that need to be resolved, so users should not expect these two in a snapshots until the issues are resolved.

openSUSE builds bonds in Asia summit

December 15th, 2015 by

The openSUSE.Asia Summit brought people from all over Asia together for one purpose; to share knowledge about open source development and to inform attendees of community initiatives and progress with project developments.

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The summit, which took place in Taipei, Taiwan, Dec. 4 – 6, even had a release party for openSUSE Leap 42.1 that was co-hosted with Ubuntu.

Mr. Mohammad Edwin Zakaria, IT and Linux consultant, traveled from Indonesia to present how schools there are using the openSUSE Education project to enhance educational quality and equality.

Kenny Chen, a contributor from Taiwan, provided a hands-on experience at the summit by teaching attendees about using High Availability Clusters with openSUSE.

Ben Chou, a Software Engineer from SUSE’s Quality Assurance team in Taipei, discussed continuous integration and the capabilities of using Jenkins.

Dominique Leuenberger, who traveled from Switzerland, provided a presentation about the complexities of building the fast paced, updated versions of openSUSE Tumbleweed using controls to eliminate the risk of breaking users systems.

Michal Hrusecky, who is on the openSUSE board, traveled from Czech Republic to provide the keynote speech for the second-annual summit and updated the attendees about the progress of the openSUSE project.

Membership window opens, three seats available for openSUSE Board

December 8th, 2015 by

Contributors of openSUSE that are not currently members can now apply for membership during a three-week window and can be a part of the changes to come in the project.

Three seats are open for this year’s openSUSE board elections and only members will elect representatives to serve on the openSUSE Board for a 24 months term.

openSUSE board members influence the future direction of the project, so if any openSUSE member knows a member they would like to serve on the board, they should contact the election officials to propose the candidate.

The three seats that currently held by Andrew Wafaa, Bruno Friedman and Robert Schweikert are available.

Richard Brown, the openSUSE Board chairman, the current board and the openSUSE Election Committee extended all current board member terms by one month due to scheduling, but the process for electing openSUSE representatives to serve on the board has officially begun.

Election Committee

The committee for this election is Andrew Wafaa and Martin Pluskal.

Only openSUSE members have the right to run for a board seat, except if they are on the Election Committee. To stand for a position on the openSUSE board, please send a mail to opensuse-project@opensuse.org and election-officials@opensuse.org.

Election Phases

Phase 0 (Dec. 7) Initial

  • Announcement of the openSUSE Board elections for 2016.
  • Three-week period to apply for an openSUSE membership (in order to vote or candidate).
  • Three-week phase to stand for a position in the openSUSE Board.
  • On Dec. 27, interested persons who qualify must give notification of intent to run and application for an openSUSE membership close.

Phase 1 (Dec. 28) Campaign

  • Start of 4 week campaign for the candidates before the ballots open (campaign might be done until ballots close).

Phase 2 (Jan. 18) Elections

  • Ballots open: Please cast your vote!
  • Ballots close on Jan. 30 (end of phase 2)

Results (Jan. 31)

  • Announcement of the results

To learn more about the election details and applying for membership, visit the following wiki pages:
http://en.opensuse.org/openSUSE:Board_election
http://en.opensuse.org/openSUSE:Board_election#Phase_0:_Notification_of_Intent_to_Run_or_nomination
http://en.opensuse.org/openSUSE:Members
http://en.opensuse.org/openSUSE:Membership_officials#Process

Hack Week, Hour of Code start this week

December 7th, 2015 by

Today is the beginning of two week-long events that are both exciting and serve a great purpose.

This week the Hour of Code begins and the lessons of teaching students to write code is a novel idea. Using Star Wars and the soccer ball looking droid BB-8, students are learning the basics of code worldwide. Touché to the technical staff of Star Wars for providing lessons for this good cause.

Students aren’t the only ones this week who are having fun and doing experimental coding.We’re doing a Hack Week this week and there are plenty of projects people can contribute to on the Hack Week website. Maybe students who breeze through their Hour of Code lessons would be interested in learning a few of openSUSE’s Hack Week projects.

One of the projects is learning ruby with betaman submitted by gameboy974. vitezslav_cizek’s project is to unlock locked devices. bamvor’s project is using two ARM 64bit boards and a sensor kit for his project on openSUSE with Linaro 96 board.

One project is even doing some KDE bugzilla cleanup.

Coding is important, but so is documentation. One Hack Week project is also dedicated to reinforcing this point. There are a list of pages on a Mozilla etherpad for the openSUSE wiki that need to be refreshed and refined.

Join us this week for some hacking and use the Hack Week website and IRC for communicating.

openSUSE seeks ideas for Google Summer of Code

December 2nd, 2015 by

google summer of codeIn recent years, many open source people have gravitated away from Google, but while Google’s history may have some shady areas that conflict with open source ideals and philosophy, not all parts of the abc.xyz conglomerate are bad.

It’s open source projects prove it has a genuine interest in contributing to and emboldening open source.

The most encouraging of its projects that embolden open source is its Google Summer of Code.

GSoC 2014 had the highest amount of open source organizations selected with 190. A concerning statistic that stands out in last year’s GSoC is that it accepted the fewest amount of open source projects since 2007. Let us hope a lowering trend like this does not continue and that it is not from the lack of open source projects submitting fewer GSoC applications.

Why? Because the world needs mentors and open source needs more code.

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Tumbleweed changes fonts, Leap gets several updates

November 27th, 2015 by

Tumbleweed-black-greenTumbleweed had one snapshot so far this week that brought more appeal to users of openSUSE.

Snapshot 20151123 changed fonts for openSUSE. The terminal font changed to Adobe Code Pro and Roboto was also added as the default font.

The fonts are not only available in Tumbleweed; users of Leap can update the fonts as an option. The reason for the change was to provide a more appealing, complete font.

Wireshark upgraded to 2.0 in Tumbleweed and the new features are a new user interface. The legacy interface is expected to be removed in Wireshark 2.2. Wireshark’s RPM-based package definition provides the new interface in the “wireshark-qt” package and the old interface in the “wireshark-gtk” package.

Fixes were made for Boost version 1.59 and GStreamer 1.6 and these two are expected to make it into a Tumbleweed snapshot soon. (more…)

Weekly review: openSUSE Leap 42.1 gets new ports, Hack Week scheduled

November 20th, 2015 by

The openSUSE Project has been very busy this week. The project shared a booth with SUSE at the Supercomputing Conference in Austin, Texas, this week.

The theme (see photo above) caught the attention of the attendees and those stopping by the booth could get a lightsaber for watching our presentations or playing a retro Sega Star Wars from 1994 running on openSUSE Leap 42.1.

SC15 really put things into perspective on how scientists, physicists and sysadmins use the Geeko distribution for simulations, Exascale computing and High Performance Computing and system management.

Several attendees expressed interest in ARM and the timing was perfect to let the attendees know that openSUSE released a port of openSUSE Leap 42.1 to AArch64, which is installable on the AMD, APM and Cavium SoCs (Seattle, X-Gene, ThunderX). There is also sharing the SLE12 SP1 ARM enablement for those hardware platforms, but providing the full Leap package set.

Hack Week

In three weeks, openSUSE/SUSE hackers will experiment without limits! That’s right, we will have Hack Week from Dec. 7 – 11. This Hack Week 13, which I’ll nickname Hack Week 7/11, is all about bringing innovation to the project and exploring the possibility of making ideas a reality. Anyone can participate. Just visit https://hackweek.suse.com/, sign up for a project you like or create a new project and recruit participants to hack with you.

Tumbleweed

Tumbleweed is once again finding a rhythm for the release of its snapshots. This week there were three snapshots and its possible there might be a fourth before the end of the week.

The three snapshots this week brought GNOME 3.18.2, KDE Applications 15.08.03 and several other fixes.

In the next snapshot, expect new default system fonts, X.Org 1.18 and Mesa 11.0.5. Ghostscript 9.18 is also expected, but it did cause a few build failures in stagings, so if you’re building anything against it, be forewarned.

There are some projects in Factory staging we need your help with before they will be released in a Tumbleweed snapshot.

Dominique Leuenberger wrote in the Tumbleweed weekly review email that some expect issues with the new Boost version 1.59 and that there are quick a few fixes needed. GStreamer 1.6 has most of the packages ready, but some the critical component Phonon is missing.

With all this, I wish you a great weekend – and always remember: Have a
lot of fun.

Tumbleweed gets Firefox 42, Machinery ready for Leap

November 12th, 2015 by

Tumbleweed-black-greenTumbleweed

Two releases snapshots in Tumbleweed brought a new Linux kernel and a web browser update for Mozilla.

Firefox updated to version 42 in the 20151110 snapshot and the 20151106 snapshot updated the Linux kernel to 4.3.

Firefox 42 removed some obsolete patches and had some Login Manager improvements.

Wine updated to version 1.7.54 and improved video decoding; major Turkish translations were in the update as well. Btrfs had several updates in the 20151110 snapshot so expect big improvements to the filesystem and its usage.

Tumbleweed has branding that has yet to be implemented, so contributors are more than welcome to work on including it in Tumbleweed.

Leap

For those using openSUSE Leap 42.1 and sysadmins managing several computers, Machinery can now be used with openSUSE’s latest release Leap 42.1. For those who are unfamiliar with the Machinery Project, check it out. It’s a great command line tool that focuses on system analysis, automation and tool integration.

Being able to use Machinery with openSUSE is just one of several reasons for developers, sysadmins and desktop users to use openSUSE’s two distributions Tumbleweed and openSUSE Leap 42.1.

For more information one how to use Machinery, visit the github page.

The weekly review: openSUSE leaps forward, SUSECon jams, Tumbleweed looks at 4.3 Kernel

November 6th, 2015 by

While the work week comes to a close, the openSUSE project’s week continues into the weekend.

The project will have a booth at Open Rhein Ruhr in Oberhausen, Germany, and in two weeks openSUSE will join with SUSE at Super Computing 2015 in Austin, Texas.

openSUSE Leap 42.1 was released this week at SUSECon 2015, which was a blast. If you have not seen the video release at SUSECon called Uptime Funk, you have to listen to it. The hits on YouTube are going through the roof with this parody.

The reviews for openSUSE Leap 42.1 are looking good. While some media are comparing openSUSE Leap 42.1 to the recent release of Fedora 23 (Congratulations Fedora), openSUSE Leap 42.1 is targeting developers, sysadmins and users who want a more mature and stable Linux environment. Through the uses of libraries and other source packages shared with SUSE Linux Enterprise, openSUSE Leap 42.1 offers something entirely different than the newest open source packages because the openSUSE project has Tumbleweed; Leap’s purpose is focused on giving users who gradually upgrade confidence in our new distribution. While the project is more than happy to gain new Linux users, Leap focuses is on the idea of system upgrades.

Tumbleweed is the project’s other distribution that provide the latest reliable and tested packages, so people who want the latest packages should look at using that rather than Leap. This week Tumbleweed released the 20151030 snapshot.

Some of the newest packages upgraded in that snapshot were Mesa 11.0.4, GNOME 3.18.1, Linux Kernel 4.2.4, LibreOffice 5.0.3 with the GTK3 module split out and XOrg 1.17.4. Expect the Linux kernel to update to 4.3 soon in Tumbleweed.
Expect more news to be posted about Leap in the coming weeks. Details about Power 8 (ppc64le), and ARM (AArch64) in openSUSE Leap 42.1 should be available in the next few weeks as well as some other Leap related news.

openSUSE Leap 42.1 Becomes First Hybrid Distribution

November 4th, 2015 by

Bridging Community and Enterprise

(In other languages: EL, LT, SP, FR)

The wait is over and a new era begins for openSUSE releases. Contributors, friends and fans can now download the first Linux hybrid distro openSUSE Leap 42.1. Since the last release, exactly one year ago, openSUSE transformed its development process to create an entirely new type of hybrid Linux distribution called openSUSE Leap.

Leap-green.png

Version 42.1 is the first version of openSUSE Leap that uses source from SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) providing a level of stability that will prove to be unmatched by other Linux distributions. Bonding community development and enterprise reliability provides more cohesion for the project and its contributor’s maintenance updates. openSUSE Leap will benefit from the enterprise maintenance effort and will have some of the same packages and updates as SLE, which is different from previous openSUSE versions that created separate maintenance streams.

Community developers provide an equal level of contribution to Leap and upstream projects to the release, which bridges a gap between matured packages and newer packages found in openSUSE’s other distribution Tumbleweed.

Since the move was such a shift from previous versions, a new version number and version naming strategy was adapted to reflect the change. The SLE sources come from SUSE’s soon to be released SLE 12 Service Pack 1 (SP1). The naming strategy is SLE 12 SP1 or 12.1 + 30 = openSUSE Leap 42.1. Many have asked why 42, but SUSE and openSUSE have a tradition of starting big ideas with a four and two, a reference to The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy.

Every minor version of openSUSE Leap users can expect a new KDE and GNOME, but today is all about openSUSE Leap 42.1, so if you are tired of a brown desktop, try a green one.

Have a lot of fun!
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