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Tumbleweed Updates Several GNU Packages

March 8th, 2018 by

openSUSE’s rolling distribution Tumbleweed has had five snapshots so far this month and a lot of those snapshots have includes several GNU packages.

There were many other packages and the first snapshot of the month included an update for KDE Plasma. Here are just a few of those packages that have been updated so far this month.

The Japanese-English Dictionary package edict was updated in snapshot 20180306 and  about 6,000 new dictionary entries were added. Application developers will be happy to see flatpak-builder 0.10.9 fixed the build issues with glibc 2.27. The Windows registry hive extraction library hivex 1.3.15 improved performance by using a cache of iconv handles, especially when dumping out large hives and rubygem-unf_ext was bumped up a version number to add Windows binaries for Ruby 2.5.

The 20180305 snapshot had a little more than a handful of upgraded packages with two related to the chinese language. GNOME desktop developers received the Rapid Application Development (RAD) tool glade 3.20.3, which added the GtkStackSidebar to the toolbox. The ibus-libpinyin package for pinyin and bopomofo input methods based on libpinyin for IBus fixed the config and translate input method name with the updated for 1.9.1 to 1.9.3. The libpinyin package moved to 2.1.91 and fixed zhuyin parsers. The 0.3.5 version of the xfce4-panel-plugin-pulseaudio package fixed a volume sink delay and added new management features for media players.

ImageMagick removed some patches and fixed some timeout and exceeded memory issues in snapshot 20180304. Autoyast2 add missing textdomains to create proper pot files in version 4.0.36. The set of libraries and drivers for fast packet processing through the Data Plane Development Kit package dpdk 17.11.1 made numerous fixes and changed the locations of the GPL and LGPL licenses. The snapshot also updated the GNU Compiler Collection from 7.3.0 to 7.3.1 and add conflicts to non-bootstrap variant for cross packages to silence the repo-checker. The text editor for the GTK toolkit geany 1.33 improved GTK3 theming and documentation and added a tool tip showing the full path on menu items representing documents. The libepoxy 1.5.0 update added new Application Programming Interface and updated the Graphic Library registry to OpenGL 4.6. The libstorage-ng 3.3.182 version updated translations and added unit tests documentation. More than 10 YaST packages were updated in the snapshot; the yast2-samba-server and yast2-samba-client packages replaced SuSEFirewall2 with firewalld. (more…)

What Is New With KDE’s Plasma 5.12 in openSUSE Leap

February 23rd, 2018 by

KDE Plasma 5.8 users coming from openSUSE Leap 42.3 to Plasma 5.12 on Leap 15 will notice significant changes when upgrading to the new versions.

The boot up time for KDE’s new Long Term Support release is faster and there is more optimization.

There have been performance optimizations all over the KDE desktop. The file operations in Dolphin are much faster now than with older KDE Frameworks releases. Plasma 5.12 has lower memory requirements and there are several new features users will notice from Leap 42.3 and Plasma 5.8.

The notification system gained support for interactive previews, which allows users to quickly take screenshots and drag them into a chat window, an email composer or a web browser; that makes it convenient for the user to not have to leave an application that is being used.

Music lovers will enjoy the new Music Controls in the Lock Screen. The new Media Controls include Previous and Next track. Play and pause are also included and it shows the song title that is playing. The lock screen controls can be disabled for added privacy.


University students, openSUSE participates in GSoC!

February 19th, 2018 by

openSUSE participates again in Google Summer of Code (GSoC), a program that awards stipends to university students who contribute to real-world open source projects during three months in summer. :sunny: With this article, I will provide my experience as a former GSoC student and mentor, give you more details about the program and try to encourage students to get involved in openSUSE development through GSoC.

Why open source and openSUSE?

First of all, you may wonder why you should want to get involved in open source development. Everybody has their own reasons, but for me there are three main ones:

  • I have fun: The most important reason is that it is fun. At openSUSE, we have great conferences, geekos everywhere, geeko cookies, openSUSE beer, fun stickers,… and the most important part: we have fun when working!
  • I learn a lot: In most of the projects, every single line of code is reviewed. That means not only that the code quality is better, but also that every time you write something wrong or that can be improved, someone will tell you. In open source, we think that making mistakes is perfectly fine. That people correct you is the best way to learn.
  • People: I have the chance to work with really skilled people all around the world, who are interested in the same things as me.

Why GSoC?

Starting is always difficult, but you don’t have to do it alone! In openSUSE, you will always find people to help you, and with GSoC this is even easier. The best feature of the program is that you will always have at least one mentor (most likely two) who will lead you through it. In addition, you will work in a project used in the real world by many users and all your code will be released under an open source license, so everybody can access, use, study, change and share it. Last, you will receive a stipend between 2,400 and 6,600 dollars depending on the country.


At openSUSE, you can find projects written in Ruby on RailsPerlRubyHTML/JavaScriptC/C++ and much more. This year you can work during GSoC in some of the most central and biggest projects in openSUSE: Open Build ServiceopenQA and YaST. They will for sure be challenging projects to work in, but don’t get scared, as that means that you will learn a lot from it too. And remember that your mentors and other openSUSE contributors will be there to help you!

But we also have simpler projects such as Trollolo, where any computer science university student could get started with Ruby. The desire to learn is much more important than the previous experience and knowledge.


Project Selected as Mentoring Organization for Google Summer of Code

February 14th, 2018 by

Let the fun begin! This week it was announced that the
openSUSE Project is one of the 212 mentoring organization for this year’s Google Summer of Code, which is an annual international program that awards stipends to university students to write code and learn about open source development during their summer break.

The openSUSE Project has participated in GSoC since 2006 and has helped more than 50 students get started with free software development.

As a mentoring organization, eligible students will have an opportunity between March 12 – 27 to submit a project proposal to the GSoC program site. The program is open to university students aged 18 or over.

The openSUSE website dedicated to GSoC offers nine projects that GSoC students can select from to use for their proposals. The topics focus on web development, quality assurance, packaging and user experience design. The technologies used in the project are Ruby on Rails, Perl, Ruby, Html/JavaScript and C/C++. (more…)

Visit Combined Booths at SCaLE 16X, Save $ With Promo Code

February 12th, 2018 by

The 16th Southern California Linux Expo is about a month away, and openSUSE will once again have a booth with the KDE and GNOME booths.

The event takes place at the Pasadena Convention Center March 8 – 11.

Community members have been running the combined booths for several years and each year more people join the booth to pass along their knowledge and experience with each of the projects.

People who register between now and the event can get a 50 percent discount on their standard registration price using the promo codes SUSE, GNOME or KDE50.

We look forward to seeing you at SCaLE.

Plasma 5.12 Brings Wayland to Leap

February 8th, 2018 by

This Tuesday KDE released the latest Long Term Support (LTS) version of the Plasma desktop 5.12.

A key point in this new release is that Wayland support was extensively worked on and is now suitable as part of the Long Term Support guarantees. In particular, the Plasma session in Wayland now plays nicer with multiple screens, and has added support for screen rotation and touchscreen calibration. It also gained a new exclusive feature, Night Color, which removes blue light from the screen at night time in a similar fashion to Redshift, which only works in X11.

This means that the upcoming openSUSE Leap 15 will offer a far more complete Wayland experience installed by default. It will just be a matter of selecting “Plasma (Wayland)” in the session list of the display manager before logging in. Nothing will change for Tumbleweed users, which had already a Wayland session available since Plasma 5.4.

The Wayland session has already been tested by openQA as part of the Tumbleweed release process as was mentioned in a previous news post, but now this is also done for live media. So, if you want to test Wayland without touching your existing installation, why not give the live media a try?

As always, have a lot of fun!

Official KDE Plasma 5.12 Release Now in Tumbleweed

February 8th, 2018 by

Mesa 18, cryptsetup 2 Also Arrive in Snapshots

KDE Plasma 5.12 transitioned from it beta version of 5.11.95 to the official release in an openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshot earlier this week.

On the same day of the upstream release, Tumbleweed snapshot 20180206 brought the new desktop software to its thousands of rolling release users. Improved performance and several new features are available in Plasma 5.12 like Wayland-only Night Color feature that allows adjustments to the screen color temperature to reduce eye strain and the System Activity and System Monitor display per-process graphs for the CPU usage. The new KDE Store offers a wide selection of addons that are ready to be installed. Plasma 5.12 is the second long-term support (LTS) release from the Plasma 5 team and will be the version used in openSUSE’s traditional distribution openSUSE Leap 15, which is expected to be released this spring.

Other notable packages updated in the 20180206 snapshot were compiler cache (ccache) 3.3.6, which improved instructions on how to get cache hits between different working directories. Translations were made for Indonesian, Danish and Catalan in updates of gfxboot from 4.5.26 to 4.5.29. Kernel module handling kmod 25 improved testsuite and allows mkosi to run testsuite in different Linux distributions. The Linux Kernel was updated to 4.15.1.


Where to Stay, Getting Around Prague for oSC18

February 7th, 2018 by

Prague is a beautiful city and you can bet that the city will be crowded during the openSUSE Conference. Hotels are already starting to fill up, so it’s best to take a look at the hotels we recommend now before all the hotels are booked out.

There are six hotels that are recommended, but feel free to book at other hotels in the city. The section for recommended lodging on the openSUSE Conference 2018 webpage gives options for hotels as low as 40 EUR a night to above 120 EUR. Each listing on the section gives a little info about the hotel.

Prague is a big city with excellent public transportation. With the exception of one hotel listed on the web page, which is the Vienna House Diplomat Prague, all other hotels are a few kilometers from the event location at the Faculty of Information Technologies of Czech Technical University in Prague.

Getting to the event with public transportation is inexpensive. A one-way ticket, which is good for 30 minutes, costs about 1 EUR. People can use the transportation map to figure out how to take public transportation from the hotel to the event. The transportation map offers an interactive map to help with planning.


Tumbleweed Snapshots Get YaST Changes for Firewalld

February 1st, 2018 by

There is no signs of slowing down openSUSE’s rolling release  Tumbleweed as six snapshots of new software were released this past week.

Not all the snapshots were large; in fact, one offered just a handful of new packages, but the releases keep coming.

The pixel format translation library babl 0.1.42 was in the latest snapshot 20180130. The new version added format “CIE XYZ alpha” color model and formats. An update to javapackages-tools 5.0.0 fixed the default Java Runtime Environment path. Kexec-tools had a bump to version 2.0.16 and now properly states all post/postun dependencies. A QtNetworkAuth module was added to  python-qt5  5.10 and yast2-dns-server 4.0.1 replaced SuSEFirewall2 with firewalld.

Snapshot 20180129 updated the GNU Compiler Collection to 7.3 and fixed a spelling mistake. Using the web-based translation tool Weblate, the graphical boot screen gfxboot 4.5.26 implemented some Danish contributions. The timezone package updated to version 2018c and southern Brazilians using Tumbleweed will know what time it is on November’s first Sunday due to the addition of code for it’s Daylight Saving Time. The yast2-drbd 4.0.1 also replaced SuSEFirewall2 with firewalld.

A handful of packages were updated in snapshot 20180128. The open source antivirus engine ClamAV package was updated to version 0.99.3; the update addressed some Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) that could have allowed for a denial of service (DoS) condition on an affected device. Both libdvdnav and libdvdread were updated to version 6.0.0 and fix some crashes and DVD issues. Full conversion of source to python3 from python2 was made with vm-install 0.10.01 and the graphical components now require Gtk3.


openSUSE Leap 15 Reaches Beta Phase Snapshots

January 31st, 2018 by

The development version of openSUSE Leap 15 has reached its beta phase builds and snapshots are available for testers via http://download.opensuse.org/distribution/leap/15.0/iso/.

Exactly like the rolling development model used to make openSUSE Leap 42.3, Leap 15.0 will use the same model until its final build. No concrete milestones will be used building up to the final release, which is expected in late Spring. As bugs are fixed and new packages introduced or excluded, snapshots of the latest beta phase builds will be released once they pass openQA testing; the first beta version build (Build 109.3) of openSUSE Leap 15 was recently released and there are currently two follow-on beta builds that would feature minor improvements if the beta builds pass openQA .

Announcements of new builds will be made on the opensuse-factory mailing list.

The beta Leap builds feature an all new fresh look, the Linux Long-Term-Support Kernel (LTS)  4.12* Kernel and users can test out KDE’s next LTS release of Plasma 5.12.

One bigger update remains to be integrated, wrote release manager Ludwig Nussel; that being rpm 4.14 that was released in openSUSE Tumbleweed just two weeks ago.