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Plasma, NodeJS, pip, Grep update in Tumbleweed

February 20th, 2020 by

Three openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots arrived this week and the snapshots provided a few major version upgrades and several minor updates with newer features.

The latest snapshot was 20200218. This snapshot updated a subpackage for btrfsprogs to version 5.4.1 and fixes the docbook5 builds. The Linux Kernel updated to 5.5.4 and had a few changes for KVM on arm64. The update of glibc 2.31 now supports a feature test macro _ISOC2X_SOURCE to enable features from the draft ISO C2X standard. Command line utility grep 3.4 fixed some performance bugs and adds a new –no-ignore-case option that causes grep to observe case distinctions, overriding any previous -i (–ignore-case) option. The DBus-activated daemon controlling mobile devices and connections, ModemManager fixed the handling of hexadecimal 0x00 bytes at the end of GSM encoded strings in version 1.12.6. There were several other packages updated in the snapshot. Among the packages to be updated were flatpak 1.6.2, GNOME’s web browser epiphany 3.34.4, email client mutt 1.13.4, strace 5.5, sudo 1.8.31 and whois 5.5.5. With less than a week to go until a rating is finalized, a rating of 92 was initially released for the snapshot, according to the snapshot reviewer.

Snapshot 20200214 updated both Mozilla Firefox and Thunderbird to versions 73.0 and 68.5 respectively. The new major version of the browser addressed six Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) that included one bug fix that affected the memory. The new release includes new features that help users view and read website content more easily by enhancing the page zoom feature. The version also added NextDNS as an alternative option for DNS over HTTPS. The Thunderbird email client addressed seven CVEs and added support for client Identity IMAP/SMTP Service Extension and for OAuth 2.0 authentication for POP3 accounts. KDE users had multiple package updates from Plasma Framework 5.67.0; Kirigami removed the header top margin from private ScrollView and properly expanded the fillWidth items in mobile mode. The KTextEditor fixed the drag and copy function, and the framework’s package also fixed a crash in the variable expansion with the use of external tools. The package for the JavaScript runtime environment, nodejs12 updated to version 12.16.0 added a new core module for a WebAssebly System Interface as an experimental feature. The NodeJS version also added Hash.prototype.copy making it possible to clone an internal state of Hash object. Text editor nano 4.8 improved the handling of lock files on start-up. Two other major version updates in the snapshot were python-packaging 20.1 and python-pip 20.0.2;  the new pip version switches to a dedicated command-line interface tool for vendoring dependencies and the changelog points out that the wheel cache is not retro-compatible with previous versions and that pip will continue to take advantage of existing legacy cache entries until pip 21.0 is released. Version control tool mercurial 5.3 fixed some bugs and added a new Large File Storage experimental feature. The utilities package for controlling TCP / IP networking and traffic control in Linux, iproute2, updated to version 5.5.0, which added four patches and a new timestamp format. Other packages that updated in the snapshot were babl 0.1.74, ccache 3.7.7 and gegl 0.4.20. The snapshot is currently trending moderately stable at a rating of 80, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

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Call for Papers, Registration Opens for openSUSE + LibreOffice Conference

February 14th, 2020 by

Planning for the openSUSE + LibreOffice Conference has begun and members of the open-source communities can now register for the conference. The Call for Papers is open and people can submit their talks until July 21.

The following tracks can be selected when submitting talks related to openSUSE:

  1. a) openSUSE
  2. b) Open Source
  3. c) Cloud and Containers
  4. d) Embedded.

The following tracks can be selected when submitting talks related to LibreOffice:

  1. a) Development, APIs, Extensions, Future Technology
  2. b) Quality Assurance
  3. c) Localization, Documentation and Native Language Projects
  4. d) Appealing Libreoffice: Ease of Use, Design and Accessibility
  5. e) Open Document Format, Document Liberation and Interoperability
  6. f) Advocating, Promoting, Marketing LibreOffice

Talks can range from easy to difficult and there are 15 minute, 30 minute and 45 minute slots available. Workshops and workgroup sessions are also available and are planned to take place on the first day of the conference.

Both openSUSE and LibreOffice are combining their conferences (openSUSE Conference and LibOcon) in 2020 to celebrate LibreOffice’s 10-year anniversary and openSUSE’s 15-year anniversary. The conference will take place in Nuremberg, Germany, at the Z-Bau from Oct. 13 to 16.

How to submit a proposal

Please submit your proposal to the following website: https://events.opensuse.org/conferences/oSLO

Guide to write your proposal

Please write your proposal so that it is related to one or more topics. For example, if your talk is on security or desktop, it is better that it contains how to install that applications or demo on openSUSE. Please clarify what the participants will learn from your talk.

  •     The introduction of main technology or software in your talk
  •     The main topic of your talk

Only workshop: please write how to use your time and what you need.

  •     We recommend writing a simple timetable on your proposal
  •     Please write the necessary equipment (laptops, internet access) to the Requirement field

Travel Support

The speakers are eligible to receive sponsorship from either the openSUSE Travel Support Program (TSP) or the LibreOffice’s Travel Policy process. Those who wish to use travel support should request the support well in advance. The last possible date to submit a request from openSUSE’s TSP is Sept. 1.

Visa

For citizens who are not a citizen of a Schengen country in Europe, you may need a formal invitation letter that fully explains the nature of your visit. An overview of visa requirements/exemptions for entry into the Federal Republic of Germany can be found at the Federal Foreign Office website. If you fall into one of the categories requiring an invitation letter, please email ddemaio (@) opensuse.org with the email subject “openSUSE + LibreOffice Conference Visa”.

Other requirements for a visa state you must:

  •     Have a valid passport
  •     Have enough money for each day of their stay)
  •     Be able to demonstrate the purpose of your stay to border officials
  •     Pose no threat to public order, national security or international relations

People of openSUSE: An Interview with Ish Sookun

February 13th, 2020 by

Can you tell us a bit about yourself?

I live on an island in the middle of the Indian Ocean (20°2′ S, 57°6′ E), called Mauritius. I work for a company that supports me in contributing to the openSUSE Project. That being said, we also heavily use openSUSE at the workplace.

Tell us about your early interaction with computers ? How your journey with Linux got started?

My early interaction with computers only started in the late years of college and I picked up Linux after a few students who were attending the computer classes back then whispered the term “Linux” as a super complicated thing. It caught my attention and I got hooked ever since. I had a few years of distro hopping until in 2009 I settled down with openSUSE.

Can you tell us more about your participation in openSUSE and why it started?

I joined the “Ambassador” program in 2009, which later was renamed to openSUSE Advocate, and finally the program was dropped. In 2013, I joined the openSUSE Local Coordinators to help coordinating activities in the region. It was my way of contributing back. During those years, I would also test openSUSE RCs and report bugs, organize local meetups about Linux in general (some times openSUSE in particular) and blog about those activities. Then, in 2018 after an inspiring conversation with Richard Brown, while he was the openSUSE Chairman, I stepped up and joined the openSUSE Elections Committee, to volunteer in election tasks. It was a nice and enriching learning experience along with my fellow election officials back then, Gerry Makaro and Edwin Zakaria. I attended my first openSUSE Conference in May 2019 in Nuremberg. I did a presentation on how we’re using Podman in production in my workplace. I was extremely nervous to give this first talk in front of the openSUSE community but I met folks who cheered me up. I can’t forget the encouragement from Richard, Gertjan, Harris, Doug, Marina and the countless friends I made at the conference. Later during the conference, I was back on the stage, during the Lightning Talks, and I spoke while holding the openSUSE beer in one hand and the microphone in the other. Nervousness was all gone thanks to the magic of the community.

Edwin and Ary told me about their activities in Indonesia, particularly about the openSUSE Asia Summit. When the CfP for oSAS 2019 was opened, I did not hesitate to submit a talk, which was accepted, and months later I stood among some awesome openSUSE contributors in Bali, Indonesia. It was a great Summit where I discovered more of the openSUSE community. I met Gerald Pfeifer, the new chairman of openSUSE, and we talked about yoga, surrounded by all of the geeko fun, talks and workshops happening.

Back to your question, to answer the second part about “why openSUSE”, I can safely, gladly and proudly say that openSUSE was (and still is) the most welcoming community and easiest project to start contributing to.

Tea or coffee?

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Libvirt, PHP, FFmpeg Updates Roll Out on Tumbleweed

January 29th, 2020 by

A total of five openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots have been releases since last week for the rolling release users.

The Libvirt 6.0 package came earlier in the week.

LibreOffice, Firefox, PHP and FFmpeg were amongst the most notable packages to update this week.

The 1.4 version of kdeconnect-kde was updated in the most recent 20200127 snapshot. The version offers a new “KDE Connect” desktop app to control the phone from the PC and SMS app that can read and write SMS texts. The newer version also offers compatibility with Xfce‘s file manager Thunar. The third release candidate for LibreOffice requires java 1.8 or newer with the libreoffice 6.4.0.3 package. Some core and curl bugs were fixed with php7 7.4.2, which included an Exif fix, and a handful of rubygem packages had minor version bumps. The snapshot is currently trending at a stable rating of 99, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

Snapshot, 20200125 had a half dozen packages updated. GNU’s Utilities tool package for multi-lingual messaging, gettext-runtime 0.20.1, removed dynamic linker ldconfig and script builder autoreconf. GNU Multiple Precision Arithmetic Library has a new C++ function in the gmp 6.2.0 update and the new version provides better assembly code and greater speed for AMD Ryzen, Power9 and ARM 64-bit CPUs. An updated to the authentication-related tool shadow 4.8 synced password field descriptions in man pages and migrated to ITS Tool for translations. The snapshot is currently trending at a stable rating of 99.

The largest snapshot of the week came in 20200124. Mozilla Firefox 72.0.2 had a fix for a web compatibility issue with CSS Shadow Parts that was introduced in version 72 and made various stability fixes. FFmpeg 4.2.2 alo made some stability fixes mostly for the codecs and formats. Portugueses Brazilian translations were made for libstorage-ng, which bumped the version to 4.2.57. Multi-purpose desktop calculator qalculate 3.7.0 provided a few new functions added support for complex numbers in the exponential integral, Logarithmic integral function, Trigonometric integral and a few more integral functions. WebKit rendering engine webkit2gtk3 2.26.3 had a fix for playing a video on NextCloud and had a fix for a web process crash when displaying a KaTeX formula; the new version also addressed three Common Vulnerabilities and Exposers. YaST had many packages updated including the yast2 4.2.59 version, which added an option to enable the online search in the package. The snapshot is currently trending at a stable rating of 98.

ImageMagick 7.0.9.17 was updated in snapshot 20200123. The image editing vector suite allows for a larger negative interline spacing and support Jzazbz colorspace. Logging package audit 2.8.5 updated lookup tables and fixed the segfault on the shutdown. Ethtool 5.4 fixed a compiler warning with the new GNU Compiler Collection. The major release of libvirt 6.0.0 removed support for python2 and added some new features like introducing a new PCI hostdev address type ‘unassigned’, which gives the user a new option to manage the binding of PCI devices via Libvirt, declaring PCI hostdevs in the domain XML but allowing just a subset of them to be assigned to the guest. The 6.0.0 version of python-libvirt-python was also released. (more…)

Using Tilix – Part 1 on openSUSE

January 27th, 2020 by

Today we present Tilix, a tiling terminal emulator, and share some tips that make this terminal an excellent tool for all users especially system administrators. As a reminder, Tilix (formerly Terminix) is a terminal emulator using libvte and written in D language with a GTK3+ interface. As such, it is therefore specially designed to integrate with GNOME.

Like Terminator, it can be split, which allows you to have many terminals in a single window:

Tilix

It can also be a replacement for Guake, as it also functions as a dropdown terminal (this feature is not available inside of a Wayland session).

Tilix

Sessions

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Winner Announced for 2020 Conference Logo Competition

January 24th, 2020 by

The winner of the openSUSE + LibreOffice Conference logo competition is Kukuh Syafaat from Indonesia.

Kukuh’s “Fresh Community Spirit” was the winning design and was one of 10 designs submitted during the competition. “Mystery Box” will be sent to Kukuh for the winning design.

In 2020, openSUSE and LibreOffice will have a shared conference from October 13 – 16 in Nuremberg, Germany.

The organizing committee for this year’s joint conference selected the winning design during a meeting on Jan. 20. The logo portrayed an ideal fit for the conference since openSUSE and LibreOffice are combining their community conferences for just one year in 2020 to celebrate LibreOffice’s 10-year anniversary and the openSUSE Project’s 15-year anniversary.

Now that the logo has been announced, fliers and posters can be created to help advertise the event. The conference website will soon be available on events.opensuse.org and the Call for Papers will begin next month.

This openSUSE + LibreOffice Conference logo should not be confused with the LibreOffice 10th anniversary logo announced on the LibreOffice blog.

LibreOffice, Firefox, Curl Receive Updates in Tumbleweed

January 15th, 2020 by

Several packages were updated this week for openSUSE Tumbleweed as was expected after the holiday season. Five snapshots of the rolling release have been delivered so far this week after passing the rigorous testing applied by openQA.

The releases are trending incredibly stable with trending or recorded ratings abovea 96 rating, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

The most recent snapshot, 20200112, updated Xfce desktop environment with an update for xfce4-session 4.14.1 and xfce4-settings 4.14.2. Various developer visible changes were made with Google’s 20200101 re2 library for regular expressions updates. GNOME’s application for managing images with a users Flickr account, frogr 1.6, removed the deprecated use of GTimeVal. The open source platform for the scale-out of public and private cloud storage, glusterfs 7.1, fixed storage rebalancing caused by an input error and fixed a memory leak in the glusterfsd process. ImageMagick version 7.0.9.14 optimized the special effects performance of Fx and virglrenderer 0.8.1, which is a project to investigate the possibility of creating a virtual 3D GPU for use inside qemu virtual machines to accelerate 3D rendering, added some patches. The snapshot continued to update packages for KDE Applications 19.12.1 that started in the 20200111 snapshot. Improvements to the scroll wheel speed was made for KDE’s Dolphin, the video editing software Kdenlive had multiple fixes and an adjustment for faster rendering, and obsolete code was removed from Applications’ diagram package umbrello. Most of the KDE Applications packages also updated the Copyright year to 2020.

In addition to the  KDE Applications 19.12.1 packages that began arriving in snapshot 20200111, KDE’s Plasma 5.17.5 also arrived in the snapshot. The updated Plasma fixed a regression in the “Port the pager applet away from QtWidgets” and fixed the drag from Dolphin to a virtual desktop switcher widget. The Plasma NetworkManager also had a fix for a crash when changing advanced IPv4 configurations. The much-anticipated fix for the security vulnerability in Firefox was made with the Mozilla update to Firefox 72.0.1; there were eight Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) fixes in the update from the previous 71 version included in Tumbleweed, but the 72.0.1 fixed the bug that hackers could use to access a computer of anyone using the browser because of incorrect alias information in the IonMonkey JIT compiler. LibreOffice 6.4.0.1 added a patch to fix a button that allowed the wrong ordering of a Qt interface and curl 7.68.0 had a lengthy amount of fixes and changes to include adding a BearSSL vtls implementation for the Transport Layer Security (TLS). openSUSE’s snapper 0.8.8 version had a rewrite of a subpackage from Python to C++ and several YaST packages were updated, which included the fixing of an error during an upgrade if /var/lib/YaST2 was missing when using Btrfs.

Troubleshooting tool sysdig was updated in snapshot 20200110; it fixed a memory leak as well as updated the use of Kubernetes APIs to support version 1.16.vMany GNOME packages were updated to version 3.34.3 and the fwupd 1.3.6 package for updating firmware added a new plugin for working with embedded MultiMediaCard (eMMC) devices. A drop of python3-setuptools dependencies from rpm-build was made with the update of rpm 4.15.1 and Optimized Inner Loop Runtime Compiler (orc) 0.4.31 fixed various PowerPC issues.

Snapshots 20200109 and 20200108 had a minimal amount of package updates, but the Linux Kernel was updated to version 5.4.7 in the 20200108, which provided a large amount of updates from the previous 5.3.12 kernel Tumbleweed was running. Updates for Btrfs in the kernel were plentiful and there were about a handful of fixes in the kernel for IBM’s s390 and for the file system ext4.

Tumbleweed Provides Some Stability to 2020

January 9th, 2020 by

The year of 2020, at least in the openSUSE world, is starting out to be pretty stable. In little more than a week into the new year, there have been five openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots released.

The releases, with the exception of one, are either posting a stable rating or are trending at a stable rating, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

With the release of snapshot 20200107, more OpenGL and Vulkan driver features and improvements came in the update of the Mesa 19.3.1 package. The newer version update also provides better AMD Radeon Accelerated Processing Unit (APU) performance

The bluez-tools package that is a set of tools to manage Bluetooth devices for Linux had a minor update from the previous three-year-old package included in Tumbleweed. GNOME’s web browser package epiphany provided some security AdBlocker preferences in the 3.34.3.1 version. Message transfer agent exim reduced the start up process initialization with version 4.93.0.4 and fixed more than a half dozen bugs. KDE’s kdevelop5 5.4.6 version fixed some wrong text in the license. Network detector, packet sniffer, and intrusion detection system package for wireless network kismet updated to its December release in the snapshot. One package update that stands out in the snapshot is the release of the finger reader package for Linux devices libfprint 1.0; this first major release provides better documentation and bug fixes related to restarting a failed verification immediately.The osc 0.167.2 package fixed regression in osc chroot. Other packages updated in the snapshot were rubygem-parser 2.7.0.1 and tigervnc 1.10.0 among others.

Snapshot 20200106 snapshot provided an update of ImageMagick 7.0.9.13 that fixed the a bug for custom profile (CMYK or RGB) conversions and the -layers optimize option now requires a fully transparent previous image. Argyll Color Management System package argyllcms had a new major version update; the 2.1.1 version update removes bundled zlib source, that could trigger a fatal rpm check failure on Leap 15.x. The library for handling OpenGL function pointer management libepoxy 1.5.4 requires only the python3-base package for building instead of full python3 package. GNOME’s photo manager shotwell 0.30.8 updated translations and fixed Tumblr publishing.

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Q&A: What it is like to be on the openSUSE Board

January 7th, 2020 by

You already know what a fantastic platform openSUSE is for doing just about anything with Linux. So what’s behind that easy-to-use and super powerful distribution that we know and love, and have come to rely on. In many minds there is a perception that its simply SUSE with the proprietary code stripped out. It’s true that a lot of the development work does flow down from SUSE but there is also an active community of dedicated volunteers who drive and make the project work, adding the goodies we have come to take for granted for the myriad of uses we have come to rely on it for.

It’s election time at openSUSE and the election board asked an existing board member Gertjan who has agreed to step up again and run for re-election of what it is like to be on the board. Below is a transcript of an offline interview between fellow election committee member Edwin and Gertjan highlighting what it’s like to be on the board of openSUSE.

Edwin: Would you like to tell us about your daily schedule and how does being an openSUSE Board member impacts on that?

Gertjan: To be fair, my daily schedule varies a lot, depending on what is on my table. Most of the time this leaves me with enough spare time to do board related things. But before I was on board, I spent that time in openSUSE too, i.e. forums, IRC etc., so the main impact on my daily schedule were the bi-weekly video conference calls. For the rest I just spread the spare time a bit differently. It does take a couple of hours though, on an average week.

Edwin: Do you still remember what motivated you to step up for Board candidacy the first time? And then why a second time?

Gertjan: O, yes, I do. I was asked by Richard whether I had ever considered running for board. My reply was “Hey, you know me, I’m the one that considers others to run”… Followed by a small discussion, a night of sleep, some others asking me to step up as a candidate. All in all, I felt I could not ignore all that, and at least see if the community would have me on board. So basically the community motivated me, and felt I had to go for it. The second time was not much different. And, in both cases, a huge motivation was the love I feel for the project and the people in its community.

Edwin: What was your first task as a Board member?

Gertjan: To read all the docs. Like many people, I had to find out that my impression of what the board does wasn’t accurate.

Edwin: What’s your best memory serving on the openSUSE Board?

Gertjan: Lots of good memories, but to summarize: The learning experience re. all the aspects of the openSUSE Project, the relationship with SUSE.

Edwin: Any negative incident that you recall and would like to share?

Gertjan: I do recall some, yeah. Most of them with the PRIVATE stamp all over them, but the thing I disliked most was me crossing ( a.o. my own ) lines on a couple of occasions.

Edwin: Could you tell us what is the biggest transformation / change in the openSUSE community that you witnessed after becoming Board member?

Gertjan: For me that would be the current process of getting some form of openSUSE Foundation on its feet.

Edwin: How is life as an openSUSE Board member?

Gertjan: Not too bad. I loved the biweekly video meetings, the F2F meetings, working together with people passionate about the project and the community.

Edwin: Any message or suggestion for members unsure about running for Board?

Gertjan: Don’t doubt, do it. It’s fun. And, the project needs you !!!

Edwin: Is there anybody you would like to nominate?

Gertjan: O, yes !!! Stasiek Michalski, a.k.a. hellcp, a.ka. LCP

Edwin: Would you still be involved in the project as your second and last term ends?

Gertjan: No doubt. I’m still a forums admin / mod, mod on Discord, Matrix, Facebook, so I’ll be around on those a bit more after my term ends. And who knows, I might go for another term next year.

So you can see there is no magic to being a board member the main criteria is to have a love for the project and a desire to move it forward. You don’t have to be a geek or niche expert, the project and the board needs all types of skill-sets so if you feel you have some free time and something to contribute jump in and put in your nomination, as Gertjan says “Don’t doubt, do it. It’s fun. And, the project needs you !!!”

This article was revised at 10:35 on Jan. 7, 2020.

openSUSE Board election 2019-2020 – Call for Nominations, Applications

December 5th, 2019 by

Election time is here!

Two seats are open for election on the openSUSE Board. Gertjan Lettink completed his second term. Simon Lees completed his first term and thus he is eligible to run as a Board candidate again should he wish to do so.

The election schedule is as follows:

== Phase 0 ==

5 December 2019

* Announcement of the openSUSE Board election 2019-2020

* Call for Nominations and Applications for Board candidacy

* Membership drive. Become an openSUSE Member. Take the opportunity to apply for an openSUSE Membership during this phase (in order to vote or to run as a candidate).

25 December 2019

* Nominations and Applications for Board candidacy close

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