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openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 Logo Competition

May 15th, 2019 by

Today, we will start a logo competition for openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019, which is going to be held in Bali, Indonesia. A logo is an essential material for the successful summit. As you have seen, the former openSUSE.Asia summits have their unique logos reflecting the communities where the summit took place. Following tradition, we have logo competition to collect great logo for this year’s summit.

The competition is open now and ends on 15 June 2019. The organizing team will send “Geeko Mystery Box” as an appreciation for the best logo designed. This year, logo will be voted by openSUSE.Asia committee.

Deadline: 15 June 2019 UTC 13:00

Announcement Winner: 25 June 2019

The Rules of the Contest are as follows:

  • The logo should be licensed under CC-BY-SA 4.0 and allow everyone to use the logo without attribution (BY) if your work is used as the logo of openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019. Note that the attribution is going to be shown on the summit website.
  • Design must be original and should not include any third party materials.
  • Both monochromes and color formats are essential for submission.
  • Submissions must be in SVG format.
  • Design should reflect the openSUSE community in Asia.
  • The logo should avoid the following things:
    • Brand names or trademarks of any kind.
    • Illustrations that may consider inappropriate, offensive, hateful, tortuous, defamatory, slanderous or libelous.
    • Sexually explicit or provocative images.
    • Violence or weapons.
    • Alcohol, tobacco, or drug use imagery.
    • Discrimination based on race, gender, religion, nationality, disability, sexual orientation or age.
    • Bigotry, racism, hatred or harm against groups or individuals
    • Religious, political, or nationalist imagery.
  • The logo should follow “openSUSE Project Trademark Guidelines” published at https://en.opensuse.org/File:OpenSUSE_Trademark_Guidelines.pdf
  • The branding guidelines will be helpful to design your logo (optional)
    https://opensuse.github.io/branding-guidelines/

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openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 Bali: Call for proposals is Open

May 1st, 2019 by

The openSUSE.Asia Committee call for proposals for openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 is now open.

openSUSE.Asia Summit is one of the great events for openSUSE community (i.e., both contributors and users) in Asia. Those who usually communicate online can get together from all over the world, talk face to face, and have fun.  Members of the community will share their most recent knowledge, experiences, and learn FLOSS technologies surrounding openSUSE.

Following the Asia Summit in Taipei last year, the sixth openSUSE.Asia Summit year 2019 will be at Udayana University, Bali Indonesia on October 5th and 6th, 2019. The past Asia Summits have had participants from Indonesia, China, Taiwan, Japan, South Korea, India, Nepal, and etc.

Call for proposals

The speakers are eligible to receive sponsorship from openSUSE Travel Support Program (TSP). Even if you live away from Bali, please consider applying for the event.

Topics

openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 will invite talks/workshop relevant to openSUSE and other topics like Cloud, Virtualization, Container, Container Orchestration, Linux desktop environments and applications since openSUSE is a collection of various FLOSS products. The examples of the topics (not limited to) are as the following:

  • openSUSE (including Leap, Tumbleweed, Open Build Services, OpenQA, YaST)
  • openSUSE Kubic, Cloud, Virtualization, Container, and Container Orchestration
  • Embedded and IoT
  • Linux kernel and file system
  • Security (Access/Integrity control, Cryptography, Vulnerability management)
  • Desktop environments and applications (e.g. GNOME, KDE, XFCE)
  • Office suite, graphic art, multimedia (e.g. LibreOffice, Calligra, GIMP, Inkscape)
  • Multilingualization support (e.g. input methods, translation)
  • Other software running on openSUSE

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What to Know Before Going to openSUSE Conference 2019

April 29th, 2019 by

openSUSE Conference 2019 in Nuremberg, Germany, is just four short weeks away.  The conference will be from May 24 -26 at the ZBau and will start at 9:30 a.m. with a keynote from Thomas Di Giacomo, SUSE’s President of Engineering, Product and Innovation.

To prepare for oSC19, there are a few things to know before going.

Money

See what the Euro conversion rate is at http://www.xe.com/currencyconverter/. Keep your receipt when you convert money; you can get the same rate when you return to the same exchange where you converted the money into euros.

Arriving

Nuremberg is a smaller sized airport. People can take the U-Bahn to downtown Nuremberg. It only takes about 10 minutes by subway to get to the main station. From the airport, you will want to take U2 to downtown main station (Hauptbahnhof). One-way tickets are about 3 euro. Buy a one-way ticket at a vending machines. A 4-trip pass is 11 euro. An all-day pass is about 12 euro.

You can take a taxi to the hotel, but it’s just as easy to take the subway. Taxi stands are right outside the airport entrance. Costs will typically run between 10 and 20 euro. NOTE – Uber, Lyft and other share riding apps are not available in Nuremberg.

Almost all hotels do not run shuttle services, so don’t expect the hotel to pick you up.

Public Transportation

You can get around Nuremberg easily with public transportation. Again, one-way tickets are about 3 euro. The location of the Z-Bau is Frankenstr. 200. To get there, take U1 from the Nuremberg Hbf (Hauptbahnhof); it is just three subway stops from Nuremberg Hbf. Use U1 from the Bahnhof going toward Largwasser and get off on Franken Straße and walk to Franken Straße 200 (9-minute walk to the Z Bau). If you reached Hasenbuck, you have gone one station too far. https://www.vgn.de/liniennetze/schienennetz_nuernberg_furth/

Buy a one-way ticket at a vending machines; bring coins.

There are several different public transportation passes you can get during the openSUSE Conference. Please visit https://www.vgn.de/en/tickets/ for more information.

Parking

For those of you who drive, please note that you will need to park in a parking garage when downtown. A map at http://www.parkhaus-nuernberg.de/parkhaeuser/kartenansicht.html shows all the parkhaus in Nuremberg. Parking at the Z-Bau is free. If you want to park the car there overnight and take public transportation, that is probably your best option.

Plugs / Power

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Bali, Indonesia, Selected for openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019

March 6th, 2019 by

For the second time, Indonesia was chosen to host the openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 event. A similar event was held in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, in 2016 and was attended by hundreds of local openSUSE lover as well as from other Asian countries. This year we are challenged to repeat the successful story of the openSUSE.Asia Summit on one of the most exotic islands in Indonesia, Bali.

openSUSE.Asia Summit is an event awaited by fans of openSUSE in Indonesia in particular, and activists of Free/Libre Open Source Software (FLOSS) in general. In this activity, experts, contributors, end users, and technology enthusiasts gather to share experiences about the development of openSUSE and other things related to FLOSS and have a lot of fun.

The island of Bali was chosen as the venue for the openSUSE.Asia Summit after being proposed by the Indonesian community during openSUSE.Asia Summit 2018 in Taipei, Taiwan. After going through a long discussion, the Asian committee chose Bali as the host of openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019. openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 will be from October 5 to October 6, 2019, at Udayana University, Bali.

Goals to be achieved in the openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 in Bali include:

  • To promote openSUSE in the Asian region.
  • To provide an alternative to the wider community that FLOSS can be a powerful tool for doing their daily job.
  • To attract new contributors for openSUSE from Indonesia and other Asian countries.
  • To provide a forum for sharing user and developer experiences because usually such discussions only occur online.

In the end, we are proud to present Bali Island to become one of the historical places for the openSUSE.Asia Summit :”)

Pre-announcement

openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 will immediately open a call for paper for prospective speakers. In addition, we will also open a logo competition for the openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019. Surely this will be an opportunity for designers in Asia to compete with each other to show their abilities and contribute to this activity. We will inform you of more details about the above information in the near future through news.opensuse.org.

See you in Bali and have fun!

Stepgun – Pantai Kuta, Bali (2) – CC BY-SA 4.0

Bali Beach Taravel Boats Vocation by keulefm

 

 

 

First Phase for openSUSE Conference Talks Begins

February 13th, 2019 by

openSUSE is pleased to announce the first phase for accepting talks for the openSUSE Conference 2019 (oSC19) has begun.

A total of 80 talks were submitted during the call for papers, which began in late fall and ended Feb. 4. In total, there were 42 normal talks, two long workshops, four short workshops, 19 short talks and seven lighting talks submitted.

The review team rated all the submitted abstracts and selected 22 normal talks, two long workshops, four short workshops, 13 short talks and five lighting talks.

Speakers have been notified of their accepted talk and must confirm their talk by March 1. If a speaker doesn’t confirm their talk by March 1, the talk will be withdrawn and the next highest rated talks will be accepted to fill the slot as part of the second phase of the talk selections for oSC19. Phase 2 will run from March 2 to March 16. The schedule for the conference will be published shortly after Phase 2.

There are five tracks listed for the conference this year. The tracks are:

  • openSUSE
  • Open Source Software
  • Cloud and Containers
  • Embedded Systems
  • Desktop and Applications

The openSUSE Conference will take place at the Z-Bau in Nuremberg, Germany, from May 24 – 26.

Visit events.opensuse.org for more information about oSC19 or email ddemaio (@) opensuse.org.

Only a Few Days Left to Cast Your Ballot in the Board Elections

February 10th, 2019 by

Cast Your Votes While You Can!

Ballots Will Close This Friday for 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections

Ahmad Romadhon, left, with openSUSE Board Member Simon Lees at the openSUSE Asia Summit

With only a few days left to go in the Board Elections, openSUSE enthusiast Ahmad Romadhon would like to urge all openSUSE Members who have not yet voted to cast their ballots before voting closes Friday, February 15, 2019 at 12h00 UTC.

The Gajah Mada University Indonesian Literature student from Yogyakarta, Indonesia, has contributed a new Poster for the openSUSE Elections with this goal in mind, as a healthy Community depends entirely on the active participation of its Members.

The ballots were sent out last week for the voting process to choose three Board Members in the 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections from a total of seven top quality Candidates in the running.

Check Your Inbox

If you are an openSUSE Member, you should have received an email containing the elections url and your credentials to log in and cast your vote. If you did not receive this e-mail, and if you are a qualified Member, you must contact the Elections Committee immediately.

You may cast your vote until Friday, February 15, 2019. You may also update your vote within this time-frame should you wish to do so.  Qualified Community Members may vote for up to three out of the seven candidates whose biographies were published during the course of the Elections Campaign.

Not an Easy Choice, but it is Important to Choose Your Representatives

2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Ahmad Romadhon

In this year’s Election, the voters are being asked to choose between a superb crop of seven quality Candidates with extensive credentials of Contributions to the openSUSE Project, and they can only select three of the seven, so it will be a difficult choice to make.

The Elections Committee would like to remind all openSUSE Contributors that a healthy Project is only possible if it has a robust roster of Members who participate in the Elections process, and it is especially important they cast their votes.  Only then can the Board be a true representation of what the Community and the Project want to help guide the current and future path of the organization.

Last spring, the elections included an impressive list of quality candidates in an election that was the longest election period in the history of the project elections, with 237 out of 400 Members voting: A record participation in percentage and actual numbers.

This year, the Elections Committee wants to exceed that record, but only you — as an openSUSE Member — can make that happen.

You can find out more about the Elections and the Candidates at the Official Wiki Page.

 

Voting Gets Underway for the 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections

February 5th, 2019 by

Cast Your Votes!

We have done our part:  Now, You do Yours!

2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi

The ballots are out and the 2-week voting process to choose three Board Members in the 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections now gets underway, with a total of seven top quality Candidates running.

If you are an openSUSE Member, you should have received an email with the elections url and your credential to log in and cast your vote. If you did not receive this e-mail, and if you are a qualified Member, you must contact the Elections Committee immediately.  You may cast your vote starting now and until February 15, 2019. You may also update your vote within this time-frame should you wish to do so. The election ballots will close February 15, 2019 at 12h00 UTC.

Members may vote for up to three out of the seven candidates whose biographies were published during the course of the previous weeks.

You can find out more about the Elections at the Official Wiki Page.

2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections: Meet Marina Latini

January 26th, 2019 by

Seven Candidates in Race for Three Vacant Board Seats

With only 8 days left to go until the ballots open on Monday, February 4, 2019, openSUSE News and the Elections Committee are running a “meet your candidates” series. Questions were sent out to the seven Candidates. The questions and answers will appear in the News, one Candidate each day.

You can find out more about the Elections at the Official Wiki Page.

Meet Marina Latini

Intro/Biography

The Candidates were asked to give some biographical personal information, such as birthdate, age, their work, their openSUSE contributions, their hobby, and more, as they saw fit.

Hello, I’m Marina, and I was born in Italy, in a sunny July about 35 years ago. When I was a kid, I was always curious to discover how things are made, and my sister was always the victim of my curiosity. I broke a countless number of toys due to my need to know! Apart from some justified issues with her, this passion guided me to study computer science, and, in the same period, I finally discovered the FLOSS world.

Marina Latini aka deneb_alpha

Everything started around 2006 when a group of colleagues introduced me to Slackware, which shares a common history with what is nowadays openSUSE. That distro and that group of friends were the best way to learn a lot about GNU/Linux, how to properly recompile a kernel and the importance of knowledge sharing.

In the same group of friends, I also found a special one who shared with me twelve years of his life. After Slackware, the group was involved with Fedora, and we started to contribute actively as Fedora Ambassadors, organizing events in schools, university, and fairs.

In the same period, around 2007, I started to contribute to OpenOffice.org, mainly on localization and quality assurance.

My first encounter with openSUSE was in 2009, where I had the honour to organize the Software Freedom Day 2009 in Perugia together with our group, thanks to the introduction by Andrea Florio and Mariano Iumiento.

For the next four years, while I was promoting openSUSE and Fedora in parallel at various events and conferences, I was always using openSUSE as my main distribution, so I then decided to focus my main activities on that, ending my Fedora Ambassador role in November 2013.

I was one of the first Italian members of the LibreOffice community. I co-founded Associazione LibreItalia, and from 2016 on I am serving as The Document Foundation’s chairperson, being involved in several events, migrations, and trainings related to LibreOffice.

I worked at Studio Storti, an Italian company that provides open source solutions for Public Administrations, leading the LibreOffice Division.

In June 2018, I relocated to Munich, working at CIB mainly in its LibreOffice team as Senior Migrations & Deployments Engineer.

Why you are running for the openSUSE Board?

I’m a proud openSUSE user and Advocate, and I finally decided to try to give something back to the Community and the Project that gave me so much until now.

The openSUSE Board guides the Project and takes care of the needs of its Community. It’s that body that can make the difference. It’s the next step between a group of passionate geeks who are doing funny stuff together, and a professional group of people with a clear vision and mission that can grow a real healthy and international open source project.

I strongly believe that, for having a really healthy Community, we need to start to search where are our users. Social channels are used also by new users who can become new Contributors. As I like to say with friends from other communities, we can have the best software or operating system in the world, but users need to find proper Documentation and get in touch with the local communities.

2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi

2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi

One more crucial topic for growing the number of Contributors is closing the gap and improving the Communication between the main Project and the local community. We respect each other, we invest our spare time as volunteers, and need to connect what is considered a local group of Contributors or users, and the others who are part of the international community.

There isn’t a unique recipe for promoting openSUSE that works in each country. Only by listening to the local communities can we improve and grow.

What I would also love to do is to interact much more with other projects that are probably encountering the very same questions. The knowledge sharing is one of the key elements of the open source movement, and we should start to listen to other voices that could come also from outside the openSUSE Project, listening to what is going on around us.

The mix and share of needs and ideas can foster openSUSE much more.

Last, but not least, we need to invest more time in the educational sector.

While interacting with the local communities, we could have the opportunity to organize more activities, for example, with universities, high schools or secondary schools for creating a large user base of Contributors.

I will be glad and honoured to serve the Community as Board Member, sharing what I learned and I’m learning while supporting other communities like Fedora or LibreOffice

Have a lot of fun!

What impact would you like to make as a member of the openSUSE Board?

For the past eight years, already, I have been involved in the LibreOffice community, as well as the local Italian community called LibreItalia, and for the past three years also The Document Foundation’s Board. I had the opportunity to see these groups grow, develop over time, become mature, and seeing easier and harder times, during which we’ve grown closer together.

I want to bring in this experience into the openSUSE Community, help us to grow, work together jointly and at the same time keep the true Community spirit alive.

Why should openSUSE members vote for you?

I am proud and honoured to run for election and serve the Project that has given me so much for many years, already. If the openSUSE Members vote for me, I will bring in all my experience and do all my best to support the Community. With my background from LibreOffice and The Document Foundation, I know the duties and responsibilities of such a role, and I am willing to give my best to keep openSUSE an open, inclusive, welcoming, amazing and – most important – fun Community.

What’s one thing people would find interesting about you that is not well known?

Life is too short to have only one passion ,and there’s so much more than just a computer, so, besides my activities in free and open source software, I’m a mad goalkeeper and I love using my telescope to look up to the stars (which is where my nickname originates from).

I’m also a music addict: When I’m not listening to the amazing, soul comforting Van Morrison, I play the accordion myself, a hobby which I started at the age of 8.

Contact information

I’m always happy to talk – write me at deneb_alpha AT opensuse.org, ping me on Telegram at @deneb_alpha or contact me on Freenode at deneb_alpha

2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections: Meet Nathan Wolf

January 26th, 2019 by

Seven Candidates in Race for Three Vacant Board Seats

With only 9 days left to go until the ballots open on Monday, February 4, 2019, openSUSE News and the Elections Committee are running a “meet your candidates” series. Questions were sent out to the seven Candidates. The questions and answers will appear in the News, one Candidate each day, in alphabetical order.

You can find out more about the Elections at the Official Wiki Page.

Meet Nathan Wolf

Intro/Biography

The Candidates were asked to give some biographical personal information, such as birthdate, age, their work, their openSUSE contributions, their hobby, and more, as they saw fit.

I started with Linux in 2003 back when you could go into the local software store and buy a boxed set of SUSE, Redhat or Mandrake. So, I started on Mandrake, later Mandriva.

Nathan Wolf aka futureboy and CubicleNate

About 2005, I gave openSUSE my first spin due to better hardware support with dial up modems and sharing the blazing 56 kbaud speed with the other computers on the network. I shifted to openSUSE full time in 2011 after some distro hopping because the structure and layout just made sense as compared to the other available offerings.

I began contributing to openSUSE in 2013 when I had a need to document the process to set up using the smart card system for openSUSE Linux. I compiled the works from several sources to make a repeatable process to properly set up the smart card.

Not long after, I had to start understanding how to install Oracle Java. I updated those instructions on the Wiki and it kind of snowballed from there. I discovered at that point I really enjoy documenting processes of getting things working. Rather than just keep my instructions for myself only, I used the fantastic openSUSE Wiki to share my knowledge.

My day job is working for Whirlpool Corporation in the Advanced Design and Innovation department. I primarily work with CAD. I have worked on proof of concepts in using Virtual Reality systems for design validation and am moderately experienced in using 3D Printers.

As far as hobbies go, beyond playing with anything Linux, I enjoy retro tech; especially the Commodore 64 … well, pretty much anything Commodore, but the 64 was my first computer. I also enjoy baking, and thanks to openSUSE and its many tools, it has made my kitchen life much more efficient.

Why you are running for the openSUSE Board?

In my incredibly biased opinion, I think openSUSE is the best distribution of Linux, but not just for Leap and Tumbleweed, for everything else that goes along with it: The Open Build Service, openQA, Kiwi and YaST. There is an incredible story to be told about what makes openSUSE great.

Whether I am on the openSUSE Board or not, I make it a point to tell this story and share it with whomever is interested. I would like to continue the tell and further refine that story.

What impact would you like to make as a member of the openSUSE Board?

As an official Member of the Board, it will be my mission to be an Ambassador of the Project to as many Communities of which I am able and share what makes openSUSE great. For reasons that don’t make sense, openSUSE is often not in the broader conversation and it needs to be there. All the fantastic innovations and refinements to Linux and the related open source software need to be told.

My second mission is to do my best to network within the Community to the best of my ability to continue to improve and refine the openSUSE documentation through the Wiki to make openSUSE even more accessible for anyone interested.

It is my ambition to assist in understanding how to work with openSUSE as clear as possible. I want to make the learning process of the openSUSE Project as enjoyable as possible. openSUSE should have the best, clearest, easiest to understand and approachable Wiki out there.

My third mission is a selfish one. It is to make openSUSE the go-to distribution for all things in the engineering and manufacturing industry. Linux has been creeping into the industry more and more, and it only makes sense that openSUSE should be the distribution of choice for the home hobbiest, small and large businesses alike.

2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi

2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi

Not only are Leap and Tumbleweed technically very sound distributions, but the additional components — OBS, openQA and the Wiki — make it the ideal ecosystem to deploy a targeted spin of the distribution or series of meta packages to bolt onto Leap or Tumbleweed to serve the industry.

Why should openSUSE members vote for you?

I will be open and accessible to openSUSE Members and the Community. I will remain positive and highlight all the good in the Project and the people within it. I will make a concerted effort to improve training and empower users to learn, grow, and own their hardware through openSUSE and it’s tools.

As a Board Member, I will do my best to network with the right individuals to bring about further improvements to the project. I will make it a point to uplift and edify the many Contributors and make sure they know how grateful I am, along with the Community for their time and talents. I want to ensure that openSUSE is the open, welcoming, and grateful community of which to be a part.

Whether I am elected to the Board or not, this entire process is a win for me. I am thrusting myself in front of the openSUSE Community, and in this process, I hope to get to know as many of the wonderful Contributors as possible. My hope is that I become more known, so that I may better Contribute to Documentation and make working with openSUSE even more enjoyable and individually empowering for all.

What’s one thing people would find interesting about you that is not well known?

I have not made it a secret that I am a fan of old tech and especially Commodore.  As a teenager, I made a game for the Amiga in the 1990s called Gator Mania. It is a 2D platform side scrolling game.

I spent well more than a year programming in AMOS Professional where I had to create my own method of displaying the screen tiles with the limited graphics memory, file format for the game levels, level builder, did the pixel art (with the help of an artist friend) and animation and for the time, created the best (in my opinion) character physics I had experienced at the time.

I wanted to do more with the game, but the Amiga fizzled out on me and I sort of moved away from the platform.

Contact information

Email me AT CubicleNate
Email futureboy AT opensuse.org
IRC CubicleNate on Freenode or irc.geekshed.net
Telegram https://t.me/CubicleNate
Webpage CubicleNate.com
Twitter CubicleNate on Twitter

2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections: Meet Vinzenz Vietzke

January 25th, 2019 by

Seven Candidates in Race for Three Vacant Board Seats

With only 10 days left to go until the ballots open on Monday, February 4, 2019, openSUSE News and the Elections Committee are running a “meet your candidates” series. Questions were sent out to the seven Candidates. The questions and answers will appear in the News, one Candidate each day, in alphabetical order.

You can find out more about the Elections at the Official Wiki Page.

Meet Vinzenz Vietzke

Intro/Biography

The Candidates were asked to give some biographical personal information, such as birthdate, age, their work, their openSUSE contributions, their hobby, and more, as they saw fit.

My name is Vinzenz Vietzke, but sticking with the much shorter “vinz” or “vinzv” is what I prefer. I’m 34 years old, live in a small town in southern Germany.

Vinzenz Vietzke aka vinzv

Like most German Linux users around my age, I made my first steps with S.u.S.E. back in the late 1990s. Over the years, I moved across various distributions and contributed to quite a few of them in different ways. My day job is product management and marketing at Linux hardware vendor TUXEDO Computers.

Starting with just one laptop running openSUSE, we at TUXEDO now offer around 20 different models plus a wide range of desktop PCs with Leap 15 pre-installed. Customers also get free lifetime support for their preinstalled system. Therefore, of course, our free phone/email tech support team need to be trained for openSUSE as well.

For this whole project, I was, and still am, in charge as the tech and project lead to “bring” openSUSE onto TUXEDO’s computers. I got in touch with oS, worked out how and when we get everything done.

In addition to technical affairs, I’m the pushing person at TUXEDO Computers to make our company step up with supporting openSUSE. As a result, since October 2018, we are officially sponsoring the openSUSE project.

We offer any of our models as demo and workshop devices at no cost and take care for the logistics and event booth support. Furthermore we’re sponsoring oSC19 in Nuremberg with demo and install fest machines.

Of course, these things are mainly financial efforts and company internal projects. Yet, to get openSUSE a wider reception, there needs to be someone coordinating, pushing, and taking care. That’s why I call my contributions to openSUSE mostly “meta contributions”.

Why you are running for the openSUSE Board?

Working together with both the Board and openSUSE devs during the last year really was a blast. There were huge efforts, ideas, and helping hands everywhere. And, as I’m no developer myself, serving at the Board would be a way to give something back.

2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi

2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi

Furthermore, I believe it’s important for the Community to have various candidates to pick from. And as I have the time I kinda feel obliged to at least offer my help.

What impact would you like to make as a member of the openSUSE Board?

From my perspective, the Board has two main roles: First and foremost, it is some kind of service provider. It serves the whole project as contact point for questions, projects coordination, and pointing in directions, etc.

This is crucial for the whole openSUSE Project and should never be changed, but merely extended if possible.

The second role might be named as “ideas sparking pot”. Most ideas coming from the Community are of a technical nature, which is entirely logical. Just, sometimes, there are things that the whole Project would benefit from, but no one sees them or has time to do so.

This is where the Board could jump in throwing sparks and giving input from someone being able to take a step back for viewing the bigger picture.

My role in this Board Team would both being approachable and helpful, for part one. But, also to give thoughts and ideas when needed, especially in the second part mentioned.

Why should openSUSE members vote for you?

I’ve been into Linux and open source communities for about 10 years now. Though I’m not a long term Contributor for openSUSE, I know how “things work” in such a big, diverse project, and how to handle this stuff.

If you want to get someone with no “Geeko glasses” on you should vote for me. Not that being deeply inside openSUSE’s Community is a bad thing! But I can bring in new perspectives, most of them related to end-users, Windows-ditchers, and the curious, but not tech-savvy, people. I both understand developers and tech people on the one hand, as well as people who are buying Linux preinstalled hardware with little will to tinker around.

This way I act as some proxy between those worlds which in the end might be good for everyone involved.

What’s one thing people would find interesting about you that is not well known?

I am a professionally trained pre-school teacher, which one might find useful for mailing list threads.

Contact information

Email: vinz AT vinzv.de
XMPP: vinz@vinzv.de
IRC: vinzv@freenode