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People of openSUSE: Sébastien Poher

July 13th, 2019 by

Sébastien Poher aka sogal

About me

I’m 1.80m, I love to wear unreadable thrash metal bands t-shirts and prefer beer over wine (or any sort of drinks really).

My Beginnings

The first computer I ever touched was an Apple II. I remember spending hours playing this one game on a 5 1/2″ floppy disk where I had to drive, via a clunky joystick, a spaceship through the abysses of an asteroid, killing monsters around.

I got into Linux in two steps, first, in 2007 but I was the only one among my friends to use it so I ended up sticking to the shitty OS I had. My next re-discovery of Linux was later in 2012 when I started professional training in system administration.

Why openSUSE

I tried many Linux and BSD distributions but always got frustrated after a while. Leap offered me the exact perfect balance I was looking for between stability, reliability and relative freshness of packages.

My first contribution

I wanted to have an up-to-date package of Tilix (a tiling terminal emulator) so I worked on it; this made me discover the Open Build Service (OBS), which is such a wonderful tool, but above all, I found it easy to contribute. I think that one strength of the openSUSE Project is that the step someone would need to make to start contributing is a really small one.

About the community

I am a bit of a misanthropist so seeing that people from different origins, that do not necessarily know each other, are able to work together in a constructive, peaceful and funny way provides me a good dose of hope!

What I do in the realm of openSUSE

I maintain a small set of packages. It’s fun to do and it makes me learn a lot about the process of creation and all the clockwork behind a distribution. However, the highlight of my openSUSE activities is my involvement in the French openSUSE community through an association called Alionet. We do our best to relay openSUSE’s news and documentation in French (yeah, French people are terrible at English).

Challenges that faces openSUSE

The lack of volunteers among the users community -at least around me- tends to be a real problem. It is hard to get people involved “on the field” and keep them motivated.

openSUSE needs…

A periodic communication targeted for end users. I am glad to see this “People of openSUSE” project being revived, I would be happy to see the same thing happening with short articles about different software available in openSUSE or tips and tricks related to Leap, Tumbleweed or other openSUSE projects. Maybe by the end of the year or next year I will have more time to make this happens.

Me beyond openSUSE

I learn to play drums. It is kinda hard yet funny to see that, at first, my body does not obey my brain but after a while they manage to work together and create a nice rhythm.

My Computer setup

I have a Thinkpad T450 running Leap 15.1 with GNOME. The apps I use the most are Evolution, Firefox, Tilix and Cherrytree.

openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 Logo Competition Winner

July 9th, 2019 by

The votes are in and the openSUSE Project is happy to announce that the openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 logo competition winner is Hervy Qurrotul from Indonesia. Congratulations Hervy! As the winner, Hervy will receive a “mystery box” from the committee.

On this logo competition, we have 18 submissions from all over the world. All the designs are great. This logo competition is voted by openSUSE.Asia Committee and Local Team. Thank you for your vote.

We would like to say thank you to all logo competition participants, Andi Laksana, Anggara Permana Putra, Bayu Aji, Budi Setiawan, Durim Berisha, Hammouda Elbez, Haruo Yoshino, Hege Dalsgaard, Hermansyah, Ilham Yusuf Fanani, Ka Chung Chan, M Afifudin, Muhammad Luthfi As Syafii, Rania Amina, Wisnu Adi Santoso, and Yuha Bani Mahardika.  We look forward to see you at the Summit.

openSUSE.Asia Summit 2020: Call for Host

June 28th, 2019 by

The openSUSE.Asia Summit is the largest annual openSUSE conference in Asia, attended by contributors and enthusiasts from all over Asia. The event focuses primarily on the openSUSE distribution, its applications for personal and enterprise use, and open source culture. It brings together the openSUSE community in Asia, providing a forum for users, developers, foundation leaders, governments and businesses to discuss the present technology and future developments.

The Summit’s preference is to find new locations each year as we spread openSUSE throughout Asia, and we are looking for local organizers to rise to the challenge of organizing an excellent openSUSE event in 2020. We need individuals and communities to get together and organize a successful openSUSE.Asia Summit. The openSUSE.Asia organization committee assists throughout the process.

Proposals for openSUSE.Asia Summit 2020

For those of you who are interested in hosting the next openSUSE.Asia Summit, you are invited to submit a formal proposal to the openSUSE.Asia organization committee and join this year summit. The deadlines for the proposals are as the following:

  • Aug. 1: Registration on the host candidates
  • Sep. 28: Deadline of Submission of the proposals
  • Oct. 5-6: Presentation at openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019
  • Dec. 1: Announcement of the next host

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People of openSUSE: Stasiek Michalski

June 7th, 2019 by

Introduction

I’m LCP, or Stasiek if you can pronounce that. Just a 20 years old guy from Poland who spends way too much time in front of computers. That’s how all my potted plants end up dead.

My Journey

I’ve been using computers for as long as I can remember, playing Solitaire, The Settlers, and other simple DOS games, because that’s what my parents and grandma liked to play. I started with Win95, 98, and 2000, before learning about Linux.

My interest in design was sparked by the original iPhone icons, which I loved. In contrast with my hatred toward the Faenza icon theme, both have fairly similar style yet widely different results. That’s how I began exploring and learned from there.

Correspondingly, my Linux journey started back in 2007 when my dad showed me Ubuntu, and just like what I did with Windows 2000 before, my pastime became installing and reinstalling Linux alongside Windows in different configurations (I apparently was consumed by the concept of installation and configuration, which might explain my YaST obsession?).

Later in 2010, I had a tough time with a machine that wouldn’t take any distro with the exception of openSUSE (although it did end up with a few Linuxrc errors). Besides, I really liked its GNOME 2 config back then; it was really user friendly yet powerful. I gave KDE a shot but to this day I never really liked it.

Contributing, how it all started…

My first contribution was because of my consistent and annoying complaining to Richard Brown on Linux Gaming Discord about the sorrow state of artwork in Tumbleweed. I didn’t like anything there. I, it seemed too dark, too boring; stuff was barely visible due to contrast issues. He pointed me to contribute and make it better then, so I did. Around the same time me and some of other people from Linux Gaming Discord created the openSUSE Discord, and I reused some assets from the Discord to create the new branding.

Even though my main focus has been artwork, I also take part in some coding, translations, and obviously testing. I enjoy all of it in general. It is a great way to make computing easier and more pleasant for other less experienced users.

Actually, to me, my most valuable contribution has been encouraging people to use openSUSE and contribute to it, while doing my best to help them out when needed. Otherwise, I wouldn’t have been able to provide anything on my own because I rely on community to actively help me out with their judgment; just as I do help them out with mine.

Side projects

Outside of openSUSE I also work on Pixelfed, some Discord distros collaboration (artwork for Fedora and Gentoo discords on top of openSUSE one) and more recently been working on User Interface (UI) design for SuperTuxKart and some custom tiles for OpenSkyscraper in order to replace injecting the EXE file (but gamedev is hard, you know).

One thing that needs more attention in openSUSE?

Libyui-gtk needs more attention. It’s a library that was originally developed for YaST then got dropped, but Manatools still heavily depends on it. Any contribution to the development is encouraged and will help bring it back home.

Gaming

I don’t play as often as I used to because I’m busy contributing, but I love Minecraft, The Settlers 2 and Solitaire Spider, which its terminal version was my very first open source software project.

Something I can talk about for hours

Recently, it’s been radio buttons. The design we use in UIs doesn’t make much sense compared to the real life equivalent, as opposed to basically every other form element. But at the same time we can’t do much about it… now that people got used to this one. Plus, I don’t see a proper replacement.

A lie about myself

I like dogs.

I’d like to add

Please contribute to https://github.com/openSUSE/branding/issues/93, every voice matters!

openSUSE Community Releases Leap 15.1 Version

May 22nd, 2019 by

Leap 15.1 Supports More Hardware, Drivers, Enhances Installation

EN / CA / DE / FR / IT / ES / JA / NL / PL / ZH / ZH-TW

22/05/2019

NUREMBERG, Germany – Today’s release of the openSUSE Leap 15.1 brings professional users, entrepreneurs and Independent Software Vendors updated support for modern hardware.

The release of Leap 15.1 improves YaST functionality and the installer.

“Continuity and stability are what we are providing users with Leap 15.1,” said Haris Sehic, a member of the openSUSE community. “With Leap 15, we have introduced a huge number of new features and innovations in security, performance and tool/desktop area. Having in mind how stable, efficient and reliable Leap has become, with this release, we managed to keep the level of quality to the point that our private and Small Business users can, actually more than ever, profit from the enterprise background of an openSUSE Linux Distribution. Let’s continue to have a lot of fun!”

Leap releases are scalable and both the desktop and server are equally important for professional’s workloads, which is reflected in the installation menu as well as the amount of packages Leap offers and hardware it supports. Leap is well suited and prepared for usage as a Virtual Machine (VM) or container guest, allowing professional users to efficiently run network services no matter whether it’s a single server or a data center.

Professional users, system administrators and developers can have confidence in the reliability of the Leap distribution based on its development process to deliver a modern, secure, maintained and highly tested distribution using the open-source build system unique to both SUSE and openSUSE, which is the Open Build Service, along with the automated testing of openQA.

What’s New

An entirely new graphics stack update is available for this stable community- and enterprise-based open-source GNU/Linux distribution. Graphics hardware supported by the 4.19 Linux Kernel were backported for the release of Leap 15.1, which uses the 4.12 Linux Kernel and supports additional graphics drivers for Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) and improved support for AMD Vega chipset.

GPU virtualization has become quite popular among vendors like AMD, Intel and Nvidia and Leap 15.1 helps to delivers these implementation and support solutions for virtualized and cloud environments.

Leap 15.1 will now use Network Manager by default for both laptops and desktops – previously only laptops defaulted to Network Manager. Server installations will continue to default to Wicked, the openSUSE advanced network configuration system. The release adds a few popular WiFi drivers for more modern wireless chipsets. A change that applies to both Wicked and Network Manager is that /etc/resolv.conf, yp.conf and some other files are a link to a file in /run and are managed by netconfig.

The management of system services in YaST has been revamped to take advantage of many of the features offered by systemd in that area.

Improved Setup and Configuration

Some of the improvements to YaST have made for better management of services. Firewalld can be managed in text mode. There is a new User Interface to manage Firewalld, including AutoYaST support/advancements. System administrators will have better control with Salt formulas in the yast2-configuration-management module, and management of SSH keys per user will make sysadmins tasks much more pleasant.

YaST comes with an improved Partitioner, that now can automatically format full disks without partition tables, create software MD RAIDs on top of full disks, create partitions within a software-defined MD RAID and many other combinations. AutoYaST also supports all these combinations. The work the YaST team has put into the setup and configuration tool has a better default partitioning proposal in several scenarios like those with small disks or systems with several disks making solutions easier for Linux professionals. Leap 15.1 brings new YaST icons developed by the community.

The YaST team worked hard on improving the 4k display (HiDPI) experience. HiDPI displays are now autodetected and the UI is auto-scaled giving the installer a beautifully crisp interface.

Security and Maintenance

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openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 Logo Competition

May 15th, 2019 by

Today, we will start a logo competition for openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019, which is going to be held in Bali, Indonesia. A logo is an essential material for the successful summit. As you have seen, the former openSUSE.Asia summits have their unique logos reflecting the communities where the summit took place. Following tradition, we have logo competition to collect great logo for this year’s summit.

The competition is open now and ends on 15 June 2019. The organizing team will send “Geeko Mystery Box” as an appreciation for the best logo designed. This year, logo will be voted by openSUSE.Asia committee.

Deadline: 15 June 2019 UTC 13:00

Announcement Winner: 25 June 2019

The Rules of the Contest are as follows:

  • The logo should be licensed under CC-BY-SA 4.0 and allow everyone to use the logo without attribution (BY) if your work is used as the logo of openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019. Note that the attribution is going to be shown on the summit website.
  • Design must be original and should not include any third party materials.
  • Both monochromes and color formats are essential for submission.
  • Submissions must be in SVG format.
  • Design should reflect the openSUSE community in Asia.
  • The logo should avoid the following things:
    • Brand names or trademarks of any kind.
    • Illustrations that may consider inappropriate, offensive, hateful, tortuous, defamatory, slanderous or libelous.
    • Sexually explicit or provocative images.
    • Violence or weapons.
    • Alcohol, tobacco, or drug use imagery.
    • Discrimination based on race, gender, religion, nationality, disability, sexual orientation or age.
    • Bigotry, racism, hatred or harm against groups or individuals
    • Religious, political, or nationalist imagery.
  • The logo should follow “openSUSE Project Trademark Guidelines” published at https://en.opensuse.org/File:OpenSUSE_Trademark_Guidelines.pdf
  • The branding guidelines will be helpful to design your logo (optional)
    https://opensuse.github.io/branding-guidelines/

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openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 Bali: Call for proposals is Open

May 1st, 2019 by

The openSUSE.Asia Committee call for proposals for openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 is now open.

openSUSE.Asia Summit is one of the great events for openSUSE community (i.e., both contributors and users) in Asia. Those who usually communicate online can get together from all over the world, talk face to face, and have fun.  Members of the community will share their most recent knowledge, experiences, and learn FLOSS technologies surrounding openSUSE.

Following the Asia Summit in Taipei last year, the sixth openSUSE.Asia Summit year 2019 will be at Udayana University, Bali Indonesia on October 5th and 6th, 2019. The past Asia Summits have had participants from Indonesia, China, Taiwan, Japan, South Korea, India, Nepal, and etc.

Call for proposals

The speakers are eligible to receive sponsorship from openSUSE Travel Support Program (TSP). Even if you live away from Bali, please consider applying for the event.

Topics

openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 will invite talks/workshop relevant to openSUSE and other topics like Cloud, Virtualization, Container, Container Orchestration, Linux desktop environments and applications since openSUSE is a collection of various FLOSS products. The examples of the topics (not limited to) are as the following:

  • openSUSE (including Leap, Tumbleweed, Open Build Services, OpenQA, YaST)
  • openSUSE Kubic, Cloud, Virtualization, Container, and Container Orchestration
  • Embedded and IoT
  • Linux kernel and file system
  • Security (Access/Integrity control, Cryptography, Vulnerability management)
  • Desktop environments and applications (e.g. GNOME, KDE, XFCE)
  • Office suite, graphic art, multimedia (e.g. LibreOffice, Calligra, GIMP, Inkscape)
  • Multilingualization support (e.g. input methods, translation)
  • Other software running on openSUSE

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What to Know Before Going to openSUSE Conference 2019

April 29th, 2019 by

openSUSE Conference 2019 in Nuremberg, Germany, is just four short weeks away.  The conference will be from May 24 -26 at the ZBau and will start at 9:30 a.m. with a keynote from Thomas Di Giacomo, SUSE’s President of Engineering, Product and Innovation.

To prepare for oSC19, there are a few things to know before going.

Money

See what the Euro conversion rate is at http://www.xe.com/currencyconverter/. Keep your receipt when you convert money; you can get the same rate when you return to the same exchange where you converted the money into euros.

Arriving

Nuremberg is a smaller sized airport. People can take the U-Bahn to downtown Nuremberg. It only takes about 10 minutes by subway to get to the main station. From the airport, you will want to take U2 to downtown main station (Hauptbahnhof). One-way tickets are about 3 euro. Buy a one-way ticket at a vending machines. A 4-trip pass is 11 euro. An all-day pass is about 12 euro.

You can take a taxi to the hotel, but it’s just as easy to take the subway. Taxi stands are right outside the airport entrance. Costs will typically run between 10 and 20 euro. NOTE – Uber, Lyft and other share riding apps are not available in Nuremberg.

Almost all hotels do not run shuttle services, so don’t expect the hotel to pick you up.

Public Transportation

You can get around Nuremberg easily with public transportation. Again, one-way tickets are about 3 euro. The location of the Z-Bau is Frankenstr. 200. To get there, take U1 from the Nuremberg Hbf (Hauptbahnhof); it is just three subway stops from Nuremberg Hbf. Use U1 from the Bahnhof going toward Largwasser and get off on Franken Straße and walk to Franken Straße 200 (9-minute walk to the Z Bau). If you reached Hasenbuck, you have gone one station too far. https://www.vgn.de/liniennetze/schienennetz_nuernberg_furth/

Buy a one-way ticket at a vending machines; bring coins.

There are several different public transportation passes you can get during the openSUSE Conference. Please visit https://www.vgn.de/en/tickets/ for more information.

Parking

For those of you who drive, please note that you will need to park in a parking garage when downtown. A map at http://www.parkhaus-nuernberg.de/parkhaeuser/kartenansicht.html shows all the parkhaus in Nuremberg. Parking at the Z-Bau is free. If you want to park the car there overnight and take public transportation, that is probably your best option.

Plugs / Power

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openSUSE Board Alumni Peter T. Linnell died on March 18th

March 25th, 2019 by

Peter T. Linnell

Peter T. Linnell (1963 – 2019)

Peter was widely known as founder of Scribus, the Libre Graphics Meeting and enthusiastic contributor to countless other Free Software projects. For openSUSE he took over responsibility as an active member of our package review team and has served as openSUSE Board member twice, from 2011-2012 and 2014-2016. Peter passed away a week ago after lengthy battle with cancer, he is survived by his wife Pauline and his daughter Stella. His obituary mentions ways to honor his life.

We will always remember Peter as fellow tinkerer, with an boundless passion to understand the inner workings and meanings of software and people. Farewell Peter, you’ll be missed by the openSUSE Community.

Bali, Indonesia, Selected for openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019

March 6th, 2019 by

For the second time, Indonesia was chosen to host the openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 event. A similar event was held in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, in 2016 and was attended by hundreds of local openSUSE lover as well as from other Asian countries. This year we are challenged to repeat the successful story of the openSUSE.Asia Summit on one of the most exotic islands in Indonesia, Bali.

openSUSE.Asia Summit is an event awaited by fans of openSUSE in Indonesia in particular, and activists of Free/Libre Open Source Software (FLOSS) in general. In this activity, experts, contributors, end users, and technology enthusiasts gather to share experiences about the development of openSUSE and other things related to FLOSS and have a lot of fun.

The island of Bali was chosen as the venue for the openSUSE.Asia Summit after being proposed by the Indonesian community during openSUSE.Asia Summit 2018 in Taipei, Taiwan. After going through a long discussion, the Asian committee chose Bali as the host of openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019. openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 will be from October 5 to October 6, 2019, at Udayana University, Bali.

Goals to be achieved in the openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 in Bali include:

  • To promote openSUSE in the Asian region.
  • To provide an alternative to the wider community that FLOSS can be a powerful tool for doing their daily job.
  • To attract new contributors for openSUSE from Indonesia and other Asian countries.
  • To provide a forum for sharing user and developer experiences because usually such discussions only occur online.

In the end, we are proud to present Bali Island to become one of the historical places for the openSUSE.Asia Summit :”)

Pre-announcement

openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 will immediately open a call for paper for prospective speakers. In addition, we will also open a logo competition for the openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019. Surely this will be an opportunity for designers in Asia to compete with each other to show their abilities and contribute to this activity. We will inform you of more details about the above information in the near future through news.opensuse.org.

See you in Bali and have fun!

Stepgun – Pantai Kuta, Bali (2) – CC BY-SA 4.0

Bali Beach Taravel Boats Vocation by keulefm