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openSUSE to have Summit in Dublin

October 16th, 2019 by

The openSUSE Community is going to Ireland March 27 and 28, 2020, for openSUSE Summit Dublin.

Registration for the summit has begun and the Call for Papers is open until Feb. 14.

The summit will begin at the end of SUSE’s premier annual global technical conference SUSECON.

Partners of openSUSE, open-source community projects and community members are encouraged to register for the summit and submit a talk.

The schedule for the openSUSE Summit Dublin will be posted on Feb. 17.

There is an openSUSE and open source track. There are three talks that can be submitted for the summit. One is a short talk with a 15-minute limit;a normal talk with a with a 30-minute limit and a long talk with a 45-minute limit.

Attendees of SUSECON are welcome to attend and submit talks. openSUSE Summit Dublin is a free community event that will take place on the last day of SUSECON and the Saturday that follows SUSECON.

Contact ddemaio (@) opensuse.org if you have any questions concerning the summit.

Sixth openSUSE.Asia Summit Concludes

October 7th, 2019 by

The openSUSE community concluded its sixth openSUSE.Asia Summit this weekend at the Fakultas Teknik of the Universitas Udayana in Bali, Indonesia.

Bali’s newest tourist attraction, the Garuda Wisnu Kencana status, towered outside the window as participants discussed all things openSUSE and open source.

A number of participants traveled from all over the world to join students from the university. The students volunteered with running the summit and many made their first contributions to open source. Attendees from more than 20 nations attended the summit. Talks at the summit focused on open source technologies, community contributions, healthcare technologies like GNU Health, packaging, using the Open Build Service and much more.

Simon Lee and Dr. Axel Braun from the openSUSE Board provided attendees with a status update about the openSUSE Project and introduced Gerald Pfeifer as the new chairperson for openSUSE. GNOME‘s Executive Director Neil McGovern gave a keynote at the summit; the GNOME.Asia Summit will be next week in East Java, which is the island next to where the openSUSE.Asia Summit took place.

The organizers from the opensuse.id community put together a fantastic summit for the participants had several social events to collaborate on topics related to the project and expansion of the project and open source technologies within Asia. The project and attendees expressed their thanks to sponsors who helped to maked the summit a success. SUSE, Simplify8, Radiant Utama Interinsco TBKMyCoop, PT Boer Technology, Excellent, Bogorwebhost, Linksys, Fans.co.id

The openSUSE.Asia Summit started a tradition at the first openSUSE.Asia Summit of passing along the Summit’s photo album; the organizing team from the previous year passes the Summit’s photo album to the organizers who are completing the current Summit. Max Huang passed the album to Kukuh Syafaat during the ceremonial end of the summit.

That wasn’t the only ceremony. The conference started off with a ceremonial dance and opening remarks from the university’s staff.

Next year’s openSUSE.Asia Summit is planned to take place in Faridabad, India.

Co-Conference Logo Competition for 2020

September 27th, 2019 by

The LibreOffice and openSUSE communities will have a joint conference next year in Nuremberg, Germany, and for this special co-conference, we are having a logo competition. The dates of the event are still being finalized, but there are some things we can do beforehand.

A logo is essential for the conference and we want to visualize both communities during this co-conference as LibreOffice will celebrate its 10-year anniversary and openSUSE will celebrate its 15-year anniversary during the conference.

The LibOcon logo should not be confused with the LibreOffice 10th anniversary logo contest, which will be announced separately via the LibreOffice blog.

You have seen both the openSUSE Conference logo and LibOcon logo change over the years. For this unique co-conference, we would like to have a unique logo reflecting both communities in one logo.

The competition is open now and ends on January, 17, 2020. The organizing team will send “Mystery Box” as an appreciation for the best logo designed. This year, logo will be voted on by the organizers of the conference.

Deadline: 17 January 2020 UTC 13:00

Announcement Winner: 1 Feb. 2020 at FOSDEM

The Rules of the Contest are as follows:

  • The logo should be licensed under CC-BY-SA 4.0 and allow everyone to use the logo without attribution (BY) if your work is used as the logo of LibOcon/oSC20. Note that the attribution is going to be shown on the conference website.
  • Design must be original and should not include any third party materials.
  • Both monochromes and color formats are essential for submission.
  • Submissions must be in SVG format.
  • Design should reflect the LibreOffice and openSUSE communities.
  • The logo should avoid the following things:
    • Brand names or trademarks of any kind.
    • Illustrations that may consider inappropriate, offensive, hateful, tortuous, defamatory, slanderous or libelous.
    • Sexually explicit or provocative images.
    • Violence or weapons.
    • Alcohol, tobacco, or drug use imagery.
    • Discrimination based on race, gender, religion, nationality, disability, sexual orientation or age.
    • Bigotry, racism, hatred or harm against groups or individuals
    • Religious, political, or nationalist imagery.
  • The logo should follow the “LibreOffice Branding Guidelines” and the “openSUSE Project Trademark Guidelines” published respectively at https://wiki.documentfoundation.org/Marketing/Branding and https://en.opensuse.org/File:OpenSUSE_Trademark_Guidelines.pdf
  • The branding guidelines will be helpful to design your logo (optional)
    https://opensuse.github.io/branding-guidelines/

Please submit your design to ddemaio@opensuse.org with the following entries:

  • Subject: Co-Conference Logo Design 2020  – [your name]
  • Your name and mail address to contact
  • A document about philosophy of the design (txt or pdf)
  • Vector file of the design with SVG format ONLY.
  • Bitmap of design in attachment — image size: 256*256 px at least, PNG format.
  • File size less than 512 KB.

The co-conference organizing team will decide on the logos, which is subject to the conditions that the logo meets all the requirements. The final decision will be made by the co-conference organizing team and it may not be the highest scored design.

We recommend the artist to use Inkscape, a powerful, free and open source vector graphics tool for all kinds of design.

Changing the Chair of the openSUSE Board

August 19th, 2019 by

Dear Community,

After six years on the openSUSE Board and five as its Chairperson, I have decided to step down as Chair of the openSUSE Board effective today, August 19.

This has been a very difficult decision for me to make, with reasons that are diverse, interlinked, and personal.
Some of the key factors that led me to make this step include the time required to do the job properly, and the length of time I’ve served.
Five years is more than twice as long as any of my predecessors.
The time required to do the role properly has increased and I now find it impossible to balance the demands of the role with the requirements of my primary role as a developer in SUSE, and with what I wish to achieve outside of work and community.
As difficult as it is to step back from something I’ve enjoyed doing for so long, I am looking forward to achieving a better balance between work, community, and life in general.

Serving as member and chair of the openSUSE Board has been an absolute pleasure and highly rewarding. Meeting and communicating with members of the project as well as championing the cause of openSUSE has been a joyous part of my life that I know I will miss going forward.

openSUSE won’t get rid of me entirely. While I do intend to step back from any governance topics, I will still be working at SUSE in the Future Technology Team. Following SUSE’s Open Source policy, we do a lot in openSUSE. I am especially looking forward to being able to focus on Kubic & MicroOS much more than I have been lately.

As I’m sure it’s likely to be a question, I wish to make it crystal clear that my decision has nothing to do with the Board’s ongoing efforts to form an independent openSUSE Foundation.

The Board’s decision to form a Foundation had my complete backing as Chairperson, and will continue to have as a regular openSUSE contributor.
I have absolute confidence in the openSUSE Board; Indeed, I don’t think I would be able to make this decision at this time if I wasn’t certain that I was leaving openSUSE in good hands.

On that note, SUSE has appointed Gerald Pfeifer as my replacement as Chair. Gerald is SUSE’s EMEA-based CTO, with a long history as a Tumbleweed user, an active openSUSE Member, and upstream contributor/maintainer in projects like GCC  and Wine.

Gerald has been a regular source of advice & support during my tenure as Chairperson. In particular, I will always remember my first visit to FOSDEM as openSUSE Chair.
Turning up more smartly dressed than usual, I was surprised to find Gerald, a senior Director at SUSE, diving in to help at the incredibly busy openSUSE booth, and doing so dressed in quite possibly the oldest and most well-loved openSUSE T-shirt I’ve ever seen.
When booth visitors came with questions about SUSE-specific stuff, I think he took some glee in being able to point them in my direction while teasingly saying “Richard is the corporate guy here, I’m just representing the community..”

Knowing full well he will continue being so community minded, while finally giving me the opportunity to tease him in return, it is with a similar glee I now hand over the reigns to Gerald.

As much as I’m going to miss things about being chairperson of this awesome community, I’m confident and excited to see how openSUSE evolves from here.

Keep having a lot of fun,

Richard

Note: This announcement has been cross-posted in several places, but please send any replies and discussion to the opensuse-project@opensuse.org Mailinglist. Thanks!

Request Travel Support for the openSUSE.Asia Summit

July 19th, 2019 by

The Travel Support Program (TSP) provides travel sponsorships to openSUSE community who want to attend the openSUSE.Asia Summit and need financial assistance. openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 will be in Bali, Indonesia, at Information Technology Department, Faculty of Engineering, Udayana University on October 5 and 6.

The goal of the TSP is to help everybody in and around openSUSE to be able to attend the openSUSE.Asia Summit!

When and how

Requests for the TSP for this year’s openSUSE.Asia Summit have until August 24 to submit their request.

Remember: All requests will be managed through the TSP application at http://connect.opensuse.org/travel-support.

You will need an openSUSE Connect account in order to login to the application and apply for sponsorship. Please be sure to fulfill all of your personal details at openSUSE connect account to avoid delays or negative request. A good application with good information will be processed faster.

A few reminders

  • Please read the TSP page carefully before you apply.
  • Any information you send to the Travel Committee will be private.
  • We want everybody there! Even if you think you would not qualify for the travel support, just submit and make it worth! If you don’t try you won’t get!
  • If you submitted an abstract to be presented you should mention it in your application.
  • The Travel Committee can reimburse up to 80% of travel and/or lodging costs. That includes hotel, hostel, plane,train, bus, even gas for those willing to drive. Remember, no taxi!
    • Important: Food and all local expenses are on you!
  • We want to sponsor as many people as possible so please check the best deal.
  • The Travel Committee won’t be able to book or pay anything in advance. The reimbursement will be done after the event finishes and based on your expenses receipts.
  • no receipts = no money It is the rule! (Original receipts are required from German residences.)

If you have any question regarding your trip to the conference do not hesitate to ask the TSP or openSUSE.Asia Summit organizers.

We hope to see you there!

People of openSUSE: Sébastien Poher

July 13th, 2019 by

Sébastien Poher aka sogal

About me

I’m 1.80m, I love to wear unreadable thrash metal bands t-shirts and prefer beer over wine (or any sort of drinks really).

My Beginnings

The first computer I ever touched was an Apple II. I remember spending hours playing this one game on a 5 1/2″ floppy disk where I had to drive, via a clunky joystick, a spaceship through the abysses of an asteroid, killing monsters around.

I got into Linux in two steps, first, in 2007 but I was the only one among my friends to use it so I ended up sticking to the shitty OS I had. My next re-discovery of Linux was later in 2012 when I started professional training in system administration.

Why openSUSE

I tried many Linux and BSD distributions but always got frustrated after a while. Leap offered me the exact perfect balance I was looking for between stability, reliability and relative freshness of packages.

My first contribution

I wanted to have an up-to-date package of Tilix (a tiling terminal emulator) so I worked on it; this made me discover the Open Build Service (OBS), which is such a wonderful tool, but above all, I found it easy to contribute. I think that one strength of the openSUSE Project is that the step someone would need to make to start contributing is a really small one.

About the community

I am a bit of a misanthropist so seeing that people from different origins, that do not necessarily know each other, are able to work together in a constructive, peaceful and funny way provides me a good dose of hope!

What I do in the realm of openSUSE

I maintain a small set of packages. It’s fun to do and it makes me learn a lot about the process of creation and all the clockwork behind a distribution. However, the highlight of my openSUSE activities is my involvement in the French openSUSE community through an association called Alionet. We do our best to relay openSUSE’s news and documentation in French (yeah, French people are terrible at English).

Challenges that faces openSUSE

The lack of volunteers among the users community -at least around me- tends to be a real problem. It is hard to get people involved “on the field” and keep them motivated.

openSUSE needs…

A periodic communication targeted for end users. I am glad to see this “People of openSUSE” project being revived, I would be happy to see the same thing happening with short articles about different software available in openSUSE or tips and tricks related to Leap, Tumbleweed or other openSUSE projects. Maybe by the end of the year or next year I will have more time to make this happens.

Me beyond openSUSE

I learn to play drums. It is kinda hard yet funny to see that, at first, my body does not obey my brain but after a while they manage to work together and create a nice rhythm.

My Computer setup

I have a Thinkpad T450 running Leap 15.1 with GNOME. The apps I use the most are Evolution, Firefox, Tilix and Cherrytree.

openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 Logo Competition Winner

July 9th, 2019 by

The votes are in and the openSUSE Project is happy to announce that the openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 logo competition winner is Hervy Qurrotul from Indonesia. Congratulations Hervy! As the winner, Hervy will receive a “mystery box” from the committee.

On this logo competition, we have 18 submissions from all over the world. All the designs are great. This logo competition is voted by openSUSE.Asia Committee and Local Team. Thank you for your vote.

We would like to say thank you to all logo competition participants, Andi Laksana, Anggara Permana Putra, Bayu Aji, Budi Setiawan, Durim Berisha, Hammouda Elbez, Haruo Yoshino, Hege Dalsgaard, Hermansyah, Ilham Yusuf Fanani, Ka Chung Chan, M Afifudin, Muhammad Luthfi As Syafii, Rania Amina, Wisnu Adi Santoso, and Yuha Bani Mahardika.  We look forward to see you at the Summit.

openSUSE.Asia Summit 2020: Call for Host

June 28th, 2019 by

The openSUSE.Asia Summit is the largest annual openSUSE conference in Asia, attended by contributors and enthusiasts from all over Asia. The event focuses primarily on the openSUSE distribution, its applications for personal and enterprise use, and open source culture. It brings together the openSUSE community in Asia, providing a forum for users, developers, foundation leaders, governments and businesses to discuss the present technology and future developments.

The Summit’s preference is to find new locations each year as we spread openSUSE throughout Asia, and we are looking for local organizers to rise to the challenge of organizing an excellent openSUSE event in 2020. We need individuals and communities to get together and organize a successful openSUSE.Asia Summit. The openSUSE.Asia organization committee assists throughout the process.

Proposals for openSUSE.Asia Summit 2020

For those of you who are interested in hosting the next openSUSE.Asia Summit, you are invited to submit a formal proposal to the openSUSE.Asia organization committee and join this year summit. The deadlines for the proposals are as the following:

  • Aug. 1: Registration on the host candidates
  • Sep. 28: Deadline of Submission of the proposals
  • Oct. 5-6: Presentation at openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019
  • Dec. 1: Announcement of the next host

(more…)

People of openSUSE: Stasiek Michalski

June 7th, 2019 by

Introduction

I’m LCP, or Stasiek if you can pronounce that. Just a 20 years old guy from Poland who spends way too much time in front of computers. That’s how all my potted plants end up dead.

My Journey

I’ve been using computers for as long as I can remember, playing Solitaire, The Settlers, and other simple DOS games, because that’s what my parents and grandma liked to play. I started with Win95, 98, and 2000, before learning about Linux.

My interest in design was sparked by the original iPhone icons, which I loved. In contrast with my hatred toward the Faenza icon theme, both have fairly similar style yet widely different results. That’s how I began exploring and learned from there.

Correspondingly, my Linux journey started back in 2007 when my dad showed me Ubuntu, and just like what I did with Windows 2000 before, my pastime became installing and reinstalling Linux alongside Windows in different configurations (I apparently was consumed by the concept of installation and configuration, which might explain my YaST obsession?).

Later in 2010, I had a tough time with a machine that wouldn’t take any distro with the exception of openSUSE (although it did end up with a few Linuxrc errors). Besides, I really liked its GNOME 2 config back then; it was really user friendly yet powerful. I gave KDE a shot but to this day I never really liked it.

Contributing, how it all started…

My first contribution was because of my consistent and annoying complaining to Richard Brown on Linux Gaming Discord about the sorrow state of artwork in Tumbleweed. I didn’t like anything there. I, it seemed too dark, too boring; stuff was barely visible due to contrast issues. He pointed me to contribute and make it better then, so I did. Around the same time me and some of other people from Linux Gaming Discord created the openSUSE Discord, and I reused some assets from the Discord to create the new branding.

Even though my main focus has been artwork, I also take part in some coding, translations, and obviously testing. I enjoy all of it in general. It is a great way to make computing easier and more pleasant for other less experienced users.

Actually, to me, my most valuable contribution has been encouraging people to use openSUSE and contribute to it, while doing my best to help them out when needed. Otherwise, I wouldn’t have been able to provide anything on my own because I rely on community to actively help me out with their judgment; just as I do help them out with mine.

Side projects

Outside of openSUSE I also work on Pixelfed, some Discord distros collaboration (artwork for Fedora and Gentoo discords on top of openSUSE one) and more recently been working on User Interface (UI) design for SuperTuxKart and some custom tiles for OpenSkyscraper in order to replace injecting the EXE file (but gamedev is hard, you know).

One thing that needs more attention in openSUSE?

Libyui-gtk needs more attention. It’s a library that was originally developed for YaST then got dropped, but Manatools still heavily depends on it. Any contribution to the development is encouraged and will help bring it back home.

Gaming

I don’t play as often as I used to because I’m busy contributing, but I love Minecraft, The Settlers 2 and Solitaire Spider, which its terminal version was my very first open source software project.

Something I can talk about for hours

Recently, it’s been radio buttons. The design we use in UIs doesn’t make much sense compared to the real life equivalent, as opposed to basically every other form element. But at the same time we can’t do much about it… now that people got used to this one. Plus, I don’t see a proper replacement.

A lie about myself

I like dogs.

I’d like to add

Please contribute to https://github.com/openSUSE/branding/issues/93, every voice matters!