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Start Using Qt 5.10 Beta in KDE Unstable repositories: Krypton and Argon

October 20th, 2017 by

The Qt project has recently released the first beta version of Qt 5.10. This release brings a lot of new features, such as initial support for Vulkan, text to speech functionality, and lots of other improvements.

The Qt libraries are heavily used by KDE software and especially Plasma often pushes them to the limits. This means that bugs or planned changes in Qt can also negatively affect the Plasma experience.

Early testing of Qt releases definitely helps because either bugs are discovered or KDE software is adjusted to work with the new version. The KDE:Unstable repos in OBS, which are used by Argon and Krypton to carry the latest builds of KDE software from git, are now built against Qt 5.10.

This allows to test the latest combination of Qt and KDE software by installing the packages through the live images Krypton and Argon, which allow testing without a local installation, and also through openQA, which regularly tests snapshots of KDE software every day.

If your interested in the latest and greatest in KDE software, give it a try!

(Update provided by openSUSE KDE Team)

GNU Compiler Collection 6 Removed from Tumbleweed

October 19th, 2017 by

Two openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots were released this week and the Open Build Service is warming up after last weekend’s scheduled power outage.

Since the power interruption, OBS has been running a little slower, but that didn’t stop the developers from getting out snapshots of new software.

The latest snapshot, 20171017, made a significant change regarding the GNU Compiler Collection; GCC 6 is no longer available in Tumbleweed. A patch for the Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures deemed KRACK or CVE-2017-15361 also made its way into Tumbleweed. The cross-platform library Simple DirectMedia Layer, which is designed to make it easy to write multimedia software, such as games and emulators, added support for many game controllers, including the Nintendo Switch Pro Controller with the update to SDL2 2.0.6. The update for gutenprint 5.2.13 added support for two Epson Inkjet printers and corrected a mis-defined paper type that collided with standard A4 paper. (more…)

Plasma 5.11, GNOME 3.26.1 Land in Tumbleweed

October 12th, 2017 by

The week has been pretty exciting for desktop enthusiast running openSUSE Tumbleweed since two of this week’s snapshots delivered new versions of GNOME and KDE respectively.

Snapshot 20171010, which is the most recent release, fixed numerous memory leaks with ImageMagick 7.0.7.6 and apache 2.4.28 fixed Optionsbleed or Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE)-2017-9798, which allows remote attackers to read secret data from process memory. Cmake 3.9.4 added support for Boost 1.65.0 and 1.65.1 and hplip 3.17.9 added support for several new printers. New features were added for the Quick Emulator (QEMU) with the new libvirt 3.8.0 version. Two major version updates were also available in the snapshot; some targets may rebuild when upgrading with the software construction tool SCons 3.0.0 and the memory allocator Jemalloc 5.0.1 added several improvements and new features including the addition of mutex profiling, which collects a variety of statistics useful for diagnosing overhead/contention issues.

Tumbleweed KDE users saw Plasma 5.11 make its way into snapshot 20171009 less than 24 hours after the official upstream release. The new Plasma 5.11 brings a redesigned settings app, improved notifications and a more powerful task manager. The release is the first release to contain the new “Vault”, a system to allow the user to encrypt and open sets of documents in a secure and user-friendly way.    Several CVE fixes were made with the update of Mozilla Firefox 56.0, but users should be aware that Firefox has no 32-bit builds for the application. The Linux Kernel was also upgraded to version 4.13.5 in the snapshot.

Several libraries and XFCE plugins were updated in the 20171007 snapshot and Mesa 17.2.2 had several Vulkan ANV/RADV driver fixes. Support for LLVM 5.0 for the Gallium3D architecture when using SCons was also added with the new Mesa version. YaST 4.0.10 fixed the handling of Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) signatures when running in insecure mode. (more…)

Special Edition Highlights openSUSE, KDE

October 11th, 2017 by

Getting the masses to move to a Linux distribution can be challenging, but the openSUSE Project is doing its part to get people started with open-source software.

Members of the openSUSE community recently worked with Linux Magazine to publish a special edition of a Getting Started With Linux magazine with the purpose of increasing the openSUSE user base and teaching beginners how to make the switch to Linux.

The 100-page special edition focuses on installing openSUSE Leap 42.3, using the installation and configuration tool YaST, understanding security and many other topics specific for Linux beginners.

It also provides a crash course on Linux and goes in depth about the several applications available on Linux distributions and openSUSE’s default desktop selection, which currently is KDE’s Long Term Support version Plasma 5.8. Many of the articles written in the magazine are from community members of both openSUSE and KDE among others.

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Tumbleweed Goes Astronomical

October 5th, 2017 by

Astronomers using openSUSE Tumbleweed received some major software enhancements in a snapshot this week and the four snapshots released also addressed some architecture issues and critical bug fixes.

The snapshots also brought new versions of the Linux Kernel, git, GNU Compiler Collection and mpg123.

The most recent snapshot to be released, snapshot 20171001, provided an update to the programming tool binutils 2.29.1. An update of the branch head of GNU Compiler Collection 7 disabled a patch to verify a test case. The network authentication protocol krb5 1.15.2 fixed a Key Distribution Center (KDC) Denial of Service (DoS) vulnerability caused by unset status strings; Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE-2017-11368).

Snapshot 20170929 updated ImageMagick 7.0.7.4 and fixed numerous memory leaks. The Linux Kernel was updated to version 4.13.4 and made several changes, which included fixes for PowerPC and S390. The KBD Project, which offers the package that helps with managing the Linux console, virtual terminals, keyboards and more, received an update to kbd 2.0.4. Git 2.14.2 provided various fixes for output correctness. An updated version of the Router Advertisement Daemon to radvd 2.17 added systemd service file. Several bugs were fixed with the update of php7 7.1.10 including bug 75093 that affected curl detection for OpenSSL, which was not detected. A proper fix for the xrpnt overflow problems were made for the MPEG Audio Player and decoder library mpg123 with version 1.25.7.

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SUSE Studio online + Open Build Service = SUSE Studio Express

October 4th, 2017 by

Merging SUSE Studio and Open Build Service

Written by Andreas Jaeger

SUSE Studio was launched in 2009 to make building images really easy. Nowadays, images are used everywhere – for public cloud you need images; container images are used to have small and movable workloads, and data center operators use golden images to start their workloads.

As you may be aware, we have an Open Build Service (OBS) tool that helps you to build packages to deliver complete distributions. In the last few years, we have been updating this tool and it now can handle any kind of image.

Additionally, the default engine for building images at SUSE is kiwi and is used in both SUSE Studio and OBS.

Reviewing these offerings and the way the image build situation has evolved, we have decided to merge the two online services, OBS and SUSE Studio, into a common solution.

Looking at the feature requests for SUSE Studio on image building and looking at our technologies, we decided to use OBS as the base for our image building service. Since OBS already builds images for various environments, we will first add a new image building GUI to OBS. This combined solution will now be delivered as “SUSE Studio Express”.

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New Repository Caters to Tumbleweed’s Nvidia Users

September 20th, 2017 by

Using Nvidia drivers on openSUSE Tumbleweed in the past was cumbersome and fragile when it came to regular snapshot updates.

Often users needed to uninstall the NVIDIA’s userspace driver (like libGL, Xserver glx library, etc.) before updating to the latest Tumbleweed snapshot and reinstall the NVIDIA’s userspace driver afterward. Otherwise users may have ended up in a mess with Mesa overwriting NVIDIA’s userspace drivers.

In addition with every kernel update, users needed to recompile the kernel module due to possible Kernel Application Binary Interface (kABI) changes in a new Linux kernel. The easiest way to achieve this was to completely uninstall NVIDIA’s driver (“nvidia-installer –uninstall”) and reinstall it after the Tumbleweed update.

Now, openSUSE Tumbleweed users have a better solution.

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New KDE Applications, PulseAudio Arrive in Tumbleweed

September 14th, 2017 by

The last openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshot has arrived and brought the newest version of KDE Applications as well as a new PulseAudio version.

KDE Applications 17.08.1 was released in the 20170911 snapshot along with an updated version of GNU Compiler Collection 6. The newest 17.08.1 version included 20 recorded bugfixes with improvements to Gwenview, Kdenlive, Konsole, Okular, KDE games and more. The newer GCC6 version renamed the tarball and source to make factory-auto happy, according to the change log.

Four other snapshots were released since the beginning of last week.

In snapshot 20170909, Mesa 17.2.0 implemented the OpenGL 4.5 Application Programming Interface; the announcement from Mesa suggest that people should stick with the previous version or wait for the 17.2.1 release because of driver support. Users who are blind or visually impaired will be pleased to know that BRLTTY, which drives the braille display and provides complete screen review functionality was updated to version 5.5. Also in the snapshot, the release of iproute2 4.13 brought improvements to the Berkeley Packet Filter (BPF), which provides a raw interface to data link layers and permits raw link-layer packets to be sent and received. (more…)

Catching up with Tumbleweed Snapshots

August 24th, 2017 by

The last review readers received about openSUSE Tumbleweed was a while ago, so it’s time to catch up on the new packages available for the rolling release.

Release manager Dominique Leuenberger gave subscribers of the openSUSE Factory Mailing List a nice review of 11 snapshots from July 28 to August 16 in his Review of the weeks 2017/31 – 33 email.

In the email, Leuenberger lists LibreOffice 5.4.0.3, KDE Applications 17.04.3, git 2.14.0 and systemd 234 as all being available in the Tumbleweed repositories. PulseAudio 11 RC1 and Mozilla Firefox 52.3.0 also were updated in the snapshots between the same period.

Flatpak was reverted to the 0.8.x branch in order to provide better upgrade options in short term,” he wrote in the email.

There have been considerable challenges getting the 4.12 Linux Kernel in Tumbleweed, but Kernel 4.12.7 finally made it into Tumbleweed’s 20170817 snapshot and Kernel 4.12.8 passed openQA testing to finds its way into the  20170819 snapshot a couple days later.

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openSUSE Leap 42.3 Cloud Images Become Available

August 22nd, 2017 by

Cloud images for openSUSE Leap 42.3 are now available for Azure, Google Compute Engine and more cloud providers.

The images for Amazon Web Services (AWS EC2) are expected to arrive soon as they were recently submitted for review by the AWS Marketplace team.

“Compared to openSUSE Leap 42.2 we were in much better shape releasing two of three images on release date (GCE and Azure) and even the delayed image was released much closer to release date than the 42.2 release,” Robert Schweikert wrote on Google Plus.

End users can choose the cloud service provider that best fits their usage model.

Leap ships with tools for uploading and managing images. The tools allow for uploading, publishing, deleting and deprecating images.

There are a couple of known things not working at the moment like the “gcloud” command in the GCE image and the automatic hostname setting in the GCE image,

Both will be worked on as time permits, Schweikert wrote.

Cloud images of openSUSE have been available in for years and users can run Docker containers in a Virtual Machine with openSUSE’s cloud image; this has been tested with SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12, which shares a common core with openSUSE Leap.

Since releasing openSUSE Leap 42.2 in the AWS Marketplace, around mid January, roughly 220 subscribers are running openSUSE Leap. AWS customers have an opportunity to use openSUSE’s community software on AWS without any hourly-software instance charge.