Home Home > Tag > opensuse
Sign up | Login

Posts Tagged ‘opensuse’

openSUSE Kubic Moves in a New Direction

August 9th, 2018 by

Dear Community,

It has been more than a year since the openSUSE community started the Kubic Project, and it’s worth looking back over the last months and evaluating where we’ve succeeded, where we haven’t, and share with you all our plans for the future.

A stable base for the future

Much of our success has been in the area generally referred to as **MicroOS**, the part of the Kubic stack that provides a stable operating system that is **atomicly updated** for running containers.

Not only is Kubic MicroOS now a fully integrated part of the openSUSE Tumbleweed release process, but our Transactional Update stack has also been ported to regular openSUSE Tumbleweed and Leap.

Based on the community’s feedback, the new System Role has been further refined and now includes fully automated updates out of the box.

This collaboration is continuing, with many minor changes to the regular openSUSE installation process coming soon based on lessons learned with tuning the installation process in Kubic.

Reviewing our initial premise

We haven’t just been busy on the basesystem. Our efforts with Rootless Containers continue, and you can now use the “Docker-alternative” Podman CRI-O in both Kubic and regular openSUSE. But when considering the Initial Premise of the Kubic project, it’s probably safe to say we’re not where we hoped to be by now.

(more…)

openSUSE Leap 42.3 End of Life is Extended

August 8th, 2018 by

The usual lifetime of openSUSE Leap minor versions have traditionally received updates for about 18 months, but the minor version of Leap 42.3 is being extended.

The last minor version of the Leap 42 series was scheduled to be maintained until January 2019, but that has changed thanks to SUSE committing to additional months of maintenance and security updates. Leap 42.3 is based on SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 Service Pack (SP) 3  and SUSE has agreed to keep publishing updates for Leap 42.3 until June 2019.

This means the extended End of Life for Leap 42.3 will increase the total lifetime of the Leap 42 series to 44 months.

Users of the openSUSE Leap 42 series are encouraged to use the additional months to prepare the upgrade to Leap 15, which was released in May.

Those who can’t migrate production servers to the new major version in time may want to take a (commercial) SLE subscription into consideration, which provides even a longer lifecycle. The proximity of Leap 42’s base system to SLE 12 keeps the technical effort to migrate workflows from Leap to SLE low.

 

Tumbleweed Gets Python Setuptools 40.0, New Versions of Frameworks, Applications

July 26th, 2018 by

Several packages were updated in openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots this week and developers will notice the snapshots are reported to be extremely stable.

Wireshark, sysdig, GNOME’s evolution, KDE’s Frameworks and Applications, Ceph, vim and python-setuptools were just a few of the many packages that arrived in Tumbleweed this week.

Wireshark 2.6.2 received several Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) updates in snapshot 20180723, which included a HTTP2 dissector crash. The sysdig tool for deep system visibility with native support for containers had a minor update to 0.22.0 and added support for addional custom container types alongside Docker. Configurable text editor vim was updated to version 8.1.0200 and poppler 0.66.0 fixed compilations with some strict compilers when rendering PDFs. Google’s RE2 package, which is fast, safe, thread-friendly alternative to backtracking regular expression engines like those used in PCRE, Perl, and Python, simplified the spec file and fixed a Deterministic Finite Automaton (DFA) out of memory error. Cups-filters 1.20.4 made some ipp and ipps changes and also removed support for hardware-implemented reversing of page order in PostScript printers for some rare printers. (more…)

GSoC Half Way Through

July 20th, 2018 by

As you may already know, openSUSE participates again in GSoC, an international program that awards stipends to university students who contribute to real-world open source projects during three months in summer. Our students started working already two months ago. Ankush, Liana and Matheus have passed the two evaluations successfully and they are busy hacking to finish their projects. Go on reading to find out what they have to say about their experience, their projects and the missing work for the few more weeks. 😀

Ankush Malik

Ankush is improving people collaboration in the Hackweek tool and he has already made many great contributions like the emoticons, similar project section and notifications features. In fact, the Hackweek 17 was just last week, so in the last days a lot of people have already been using these great new features. There were a lot of good comments about his work! :cupid: and we also received a lot of feedback, as you can for example see in the issues list.

But even more important than all the functionality, is all Ankush is learning while coding and working with his mentors and the openSUSE community, such as working with AJAX in Ruby on Rails, good coding practices and better coding style.

The last part of his project will include some more new features. If you want to find out more about his project and the challenges that Ankush expects to have, read his interesting blog post:

https://medium.com/@ankushmalik631/how-my-gsoc-project-is-going-4942614132a2

Hackweek tool screenshot

Xu Liana

Liana is working on integrating Cloud Pinyin (the most popular input method in China) on ibus-libpinyin. For her, GSoC is being an enjoyable learning process full of challenges. With the help of her mentors she has learnt about autotools and she builds now her code without graphical build tools. 💪 For the few more weeks, she plans to learn about algorithmics that are useful for the project and, after finish the coding part, she would like to go deeper in the fundamentals of compiling. Read it from her owns word in her blog post:

https://liana.hillwoodhome.net/2018/07/14/the-first-half-of-the-project-during-gsoc-libpinyin

Matheus de Sousa Bernardo

Matheus is working in Trollolo, a cli-tool which helps teams using Trello to organize their work. He has been mainly focused on the restructuring of commands and the incomplete backup feature. The discussion with his mentors made him take different implementation paths than the ones he had in mind at the beginning, learning the importance of keeping things simple. It has been complicated for Matheus to find time for both the GSoC project and his university duties. But he still has some more weeks to implement the more challenging feature, the automation of Trollolo! 💥

Check his blog post with more details about the project: https://matheussbernardo.me/gsoc/2018/07/08/midterm

 

I hope you enjoyed reading about the work and experiences of the openSUSE students and mentors. Keep tuned as there are still some more hacking weeks and the students will write a last blog post summarizing their GSoC experience. 😉

 


The blog post’s text is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Krita, GNOME Builder, FFmpeg Get Updates in Tumbleweed

July 5th, 2018 by

The four openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots this week are trending quite stable as new major version packages have been updated this week.

Among the packages updates this week were FFmpeg, KDE Plasma, GNOME Builder and Krita along with a kernel update.

The most recent snapshot, 20180702, put out the first update ffmpeg 4.0 with a refresh of patches and an enablement for ffnvcodec when building with NVIDIA support. The snapshot brought about another 4.0 version with checkmedia upgrading from 3.8 to the new 4.0 version. The tools and libraries package to work with Extensible Firmware Interface variables, efivar, had a major update as well and adjusted its libefiboot-export-disk_get_partition_info.patch to work with the new 36 version. That wasn’t the last major version update either. The package for userspace components for the Linux Kernel‘s drivers/infiniband subsystem, rdma-core, updated to version 18.1; the new major version fixed compilations with recent glibc. Among the other packages in the snapshot there were updated were spec-cleaner 1.1.0, brotli 1.0.5 and System Security Services Daemon (sssd) 1.16.2.

The 20180701 snapshot brough Plasma 5.13.2. The release added a week’s worth of new translations and fixes from KDE‘s contributors. There were also updates to several YaST packages and libstorage-ng 3.3.312 removed an unused and obsolete file. Konversation 1.7.5 dropped a patch and fixed building against Qt 5.11. The lightweight image viewer for the Xfce desktop ristretto 0.8.3 had multiple fixes including a fix for GLib-GObject-CRITICAL in the directory monitoring code.

Snapshots from the end of last month included snapshot 20180629 and 20180628. Snapshot 20180629 improved the performance of the stroke layer style with an update to the open source painting program krita 4.0.4. The testsuite package spec-cleaner was updated in this snapshot as well to version 1.0.9, which dropped support of python 2, and there were bug fixes for Qt 5.11 with the libqt5-qttranslations and libqt5-qtvirtualkeyboard package updates to 5.11.1. Snapshot 20180628 updated the Linux Kernel to 4.17.3, which had multiple fixes for the btrfs filesystem and deleted some stacktrace patches. The gnome-builder package made the editor more reliable to restores a cursor position and fixed for a number of crashers and potential for data loss with the 3.28.3 update.

Packages updated in previous snapshots last month were were GCC 8.1.1, KDE Applications 18.04.2, KDE Frameworks 5.47.0 and PulseAudio 12.0. Release manager Dominique Leuenberger summarized the updates in his weekly review and also explained that even though FFmpeg 4.0 was updates, FFmpeg 3.x is still available in the main repo, but will eventually be be phased out. All the snapshots in the past few weeks have been rated as moderate to stable in the Tumbleweed review tool. Snapshot 20180702 is currently trending as stable with a 91 percent rating.

Dates, Location set for openSUSE Conference 2019

June 25th, 2018 by

The openSUSE Project is pleased to announce the location and dates for the 2019 openSUSE Conference.

The openSUSE Conference 2019 will return to the Z-Bau in Nuremberg, Germany, and be Friday, May 24, through Sunday, May 26.

Planning for the 2019 conference will begin this summer and community members are encouraged to take part in the planning of the conference through the organizing team. The openSUSE Board proposed the idea of having organizing team for openSUSE Conferences last month at oSC18. An email about the organizing team was sent out to the openSUSE-Project mailing list.

Developing the organizing team should help with the planning of future openSUSE Conferences as the project looks expand the conferences to more locations throughout Europe. Both oSC16 and oSC17 were in Nuremberg and oSC18 was in Prague, Czech Republic, last month.

Anyone who is interested in helping to organize oSC19 should email me ddemaio (@) opensuse.org.

Uyuni: Forking Spacewalk with Salt and Containers

May 26th, 2018 by

PRAGUE, Czech Republic – Members of a new open source community project called Uyuni announced today at openSUSE Conference that a fork of the open-source systems management solution Spacewalk is on its way.

The intention of the fork is to give new inspiration to a project that has been perceived as idling in recent years. Uyuni, however is already looking at increasing the implementation of a React web User Interface, translations, clients, container and Kubernetes integration. Uyuni is using Salt for configuration management, thereby inheriting its name: Uyuni refers to the world’s largest Salt flat, Salar de Uyuni in Southwest Bolivia.

Compatible and Innovative

“Uyuni has a vision for this open-source code and plans on growing its community and innovating the code beyond its current state in Spacewalk,” said Klaus Kämpf, SUSE’s Project Owner of SUSE Manager, who announced the fork. “Contributions for Spacewalk have decreased and focused more on maintenance and stabilization than on innovation.”

Uyuni will stay compatible, Kämpf adds as much as possible: “The Uyuni project will not break up compatibility on purpose, but that shall not prevent improvements for that reason.”

The current development plans are releasing a first version this summer, and then deciding on a release model together with the community.

Development will have automated testing using both the Open Build Service and Cluster Infrastructure.

A New Vision Sparking Contributions

Results from GitHub show the frequency of contributions have dwindled since 2014 and the current Spacewalk faq website states “Red Hat’s code contributions will decrease over time, as the focus shifts to maintenance and stabilization of the current set of features.”

A fact listed from the previous Spacewalk FAQ website, which has since been removed, stated, “As Red Hat’s participation ramps down, there will be an opportunity for the participation from other community members to ramp up. Someone (or several someones!) will need to take over some of the management role that currently rests on Red Hat.”

Uyuni community members decided to fork the project after extensive discussions with Red Hat about taking over the management role as stated above.

Spacewalk is an open source Linux systems management solution, currently available in version 2.8 as upstream community project for Red Hat Satellite 5. SUSE Manager is also based on Spacewalk and now plans on shifting to Uyuni as an upstream community.

“SUSE Manager’s development will be openly available to open-source community members for whatever contributions they would like to make to the Uyuni project,” Kämpf said.

Interested members can follow the project on https://github.com/uyuni-project, www.uyuni-project.org, or via Twitter at @UyuniProject. A presentation about Uyuni can be viewed on the openSUSETV YouTube channel or via the live stream for the conference at 9:30 a.m. UTC on https://streaming.media.ccc.de/osc18/.

GSoC students are already hacking!

May 23rd, 2018 by

We always enjoy that new people join openSUSE community and help them in their first steps. Because of that, openSUSE participates again in GSoC, an international program in which stipends are awarded to students who hack on open source projects during the summer. We are really excited to announce that this year four students will learn about open source development while hacking on openSUSE projects. The coding period started last week, so our students are already busy hacking and they have written some nice articles about their projects. ;)

 

(more…)

openSUSE.Asia Summit 2018 Taiwan: Call for proposals is open

May 17th, 2018 by

openSUSE.Asia Committee calls for proposals of talks for openSUSE.Asia Summit 2018 held at National Taiwan University of Science and Technology on August 11 and 12.  We might have community day on 10th August before the summit.

openSUSE.Asia Summit is one of the great events for openSUSE community (i.e., both contributors, and users)  in Asia. Those who usually communicate online can get together from all over the world, talk face to face, and have fun.  Members of the community will share their most recent knowledge, experiences, and learn FLOSS technologies surrounding openSUSE.

This event at Taipei is the fifth in openSUSE.Asia Summit. Following the first Asia Summit in Beijing 2014. The past Asia Summits have had participants from China, Taiwan, India, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, and etc.

This time we co-host with COSCUP and GNOME.Asia, COSCUP is an annual conference held by Taiwanese open source community since 2006. It is a major force of free software movement advocacy in Taiwan. The event is often held with talks, sponsor and communities booths, and Birds of a feather. In addition to international speakers, many Taiwanese local open source contributors often give their talks here. The chief organizer, staffs, and speakers are all volunteers.

COSCUP’s aim is providing a platform to connect open source coders, users, and promoters, and promote FLOSS with the annual conference. The conference is free to attend because of the enthusiastic sponsors and donator. In 2017, there are around 1,800 attendees, and we plan to invite more than 2,000 people join COSCUP × openSUSE.Asia Summit × GNOME.Asia Summit this year.

Call for proposals

The speakers are eligible to receive sponsorship from openSUSE Travel Support Program (TSP). Even if you live away from Taipei. please consider applying for the event.

Topics

(more…)

Transactional Updates in openSUSE Leap 15

May 15th, 2018 by

This blog is part of a series of technical blogs leading up to the release of openSUSE Leap 15. All of the blogs provide a use case regarding openSUSE Leap and the packages available in the distribution. Happy reading.

Transactional Updates is one of the exciting new features available in the upcoming release of openSUSE Leap 15, which is scheduled to be officially released May 25.

Contributed by the Kubic Project, Transactional Updates provides openSUSE systems with a method of updating the operating system and its packages in an entirely ‘atomic’ way. Updates are either applied to the system all together in a single transaction, or not at all. This happens without influencing the running system. If an update fails, or if the successful update is deemed to be incompatible or otherwise incorrect, it can be discarded to immediately return the system to its previous functioning state.

This differs from existing alternatives that already exist in the open source world. Some users use a rather exorbitant approach of maintaining multiple versions of their system in multiple partitions on disk to switch between the partitions to address a fear of tampering with a perfectly running system.

This juggling approach works, but takes an exorbitant amount of disk storage and maintenance efforts. More modern approaches like using ostree and snap attempt to address these problems and bring atomic/transactional updates to their users. However, these solutions have unintended consequence as users, developers, and partnering software vendors all learn new ways of managing their systems and existing packages cannot be re-used, which require either repackging or conversion. All of this develops to a situation where adopters need to redesign their mindsets, systems, tools and company policies to work with these clever tools. These workarounds have some key flaws that Kubic’s Transactional Updates feature strives to avoid.

Under the hood, Transactional Updates are made simple. Utilising the same btrfs, snapper, and zypper technologies that are trusted defaults in openSUSE Leap, Transactional Updates do something very similar to the traditional snapshots and rollbacks in Leap. However, Transactional Updates it never touches the running system. Instead of patching the current system, the transactional-update tool creates a new snapshot. All of the operations required by the update are carried out into a snapshot that ensures the current system is untouched with no changes impacting the running system.

(more…)