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Kata Containers Packages are Available officially in openSUSE Tumbleweed

August 17th, 2019 by

Kata Containers is an open source container runtime that is crafted to seamlessly plug into the containers ecosystem.

We are now excited to announce that the Kata Containers packages are finally available in the official openSUSE Tumbleweed repository.

It is worthwhile to spend few words explaining why this is a great news, considering the role of Kata Containers (a.k.a. Kata) in fulfilling the need for security in the containers ecosystem, and given its importance for openSUSE and Kubic.

What is Kata

As already mentioned, Kata is a container runtime focusing on security and on ease of integration with the existing containers ecosystem. If you are wondering what’s a container runtime, this blog post by Sascha will give you a clear introduction about the topic.

Kata should be used when running container images whose source is not fully trusted, or when allowing other users to run their own containers on your platform.

Traditionally, containers share the same physical and operating system (OS) resources with host processes, and specific kernel features such as namespaces are used to provide an isolation layer between host and container processes. By contrast, Kata containers run inside lightweight virtual machines, adding an extra isolation and security layer, that minimizes the host attack surface and mitigates the consequences of containers breakout. Despite this extra layer, Kata achieves impressive runtime performances thanks to KVM hardware virtualization, and when configured to use a minimalist virtual machine manager (VMM) like Firecracker, a high density of microVM can be packed on a single host.

If you want to know more about Kata features and performances:

  • katacontainers.io is a great starting point.
  • For something more SUSE oriented, Flavio gave a interesting talk about Kata at SUSECON 2019,
  • Kata folks hang out on katacontainers.slack.com, and will be happy to answer any quesitons.

Why is it important for Kubic and openSUSE

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Mesa, ImageMagick, Plasma, Frameworks Update in Tumbleweed

August 1st, 2019 by

There have been three openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots released since last week.

The snapshots brought a single major version update and new versions of KDE’s Plasma and Frameworks.

ImageMagick’s 7.0.8.56 version arrived in snapshot 20190730 and added support for the TIM2 image format, which is commonly used in PlayStation 2 and sometimes in PlayStation Portable games. The snapshot also delivered an update for Mesa 3D Graphics Library with version 19.1.3 that mostly provided fixes for ANV and RADV drivers, as well as NIR backend fixes. File searching tool catfish 1.4.8 provided some fixes with directories and a fix running on Wayland. The GNU Compiler Collection 7 added a patch and fixed for a Link Time Optimization (LTO) linker plugin. The 9.0.1 glu, which is the OpenGL Utility library for Mesa, fixed a possible memory leak. The Linux Kernel was updated to 5.2.3; the new version made a few fixes for PowerPC and added Bluetooth for some new devices. Serval Python packages were updated in the snapshot. LLVM tools and libraries were updated in Tumbleweed with llvm8 8.0.1 but the changelog states not to run LLVM tests on PowerPC because of sporadic hangs. The 2.4.7 version of openvpn in the snapshot added support for tls-ciphersuites for TLS 1.3 and updated openvpn.keyring with public key downloaded from https://swupdate.openvpn.net/community/keys/security-key-2019.asc. A lengthy list of fixes were made to the VIM text editor in version 8.1.1741. Other packages updated in the snapshot were ucode-intel 20190618, xapps 1.4.8, ypbind 2.6.1 and zstd 1.4.1. The snapshot is trending as moderately stable with a rating of 79, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

KDE’s Frameworks and Plasma were updated in the 20190726 snapshot. Frameworks 5.60.0 had multiple fixes for KTextEditor, KWayland, KIO and Baloo. The new version requires Qt 5.11 now that Qt 5.13 was released. Plasma 5.16.3 adds new translations and fixes including the fix of compilation without libinput and an improved appearance and reduce memory consumption with Plasma Audio Volume Control. There was a major version update for the checkmedia to version 5.2, which fixed a compat issue with older GCC. The new major version also allows to set a specific GPG key for signature verification. GNOME’s bijiben updated to version 3.32.2 and the update of curl 7.65.3 fixed several bugs and makes the progress meter appear again. A Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures that could allow remote attackers to execute other programs with root privileges was fixed in the message transfer agent exim 4.92.1. The 11.0.4.0 version of java-11-openjdk also fixed several CVEs and cleaned up the sources and code. Phonon, which is the multimedia Application Programming Interface (API) for KDE, removed the QFOREACH function in the headers when building for Qt 5 in version 4.10.3. The snapshot is trending as moderately stable with a rating of 76, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

Snapshot 20190724 had just three packages updated. GCC 9 received a small update that Included a fix for openCV3 builds with LTO and provided a fix for vector shift mis-compilation on IBM’s s390 architecture. The update of osc 0.165.3 fixed broken TLS certificate handling and the package ristretto, which is a fast and lightweight image viewer for the Xfce desktop, added support for Canon CR2 format and improved the “Sorting” menu with the 0.8.5 version update. The snapshot posted a moderately stable rating of 72, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

InfinityBook Pro 13 as an important part of the openSUSE reference tests

May 15th, 2019 by

openSUSE and TUXEDO Computers want to offer the best user experience

KÖNIGSBRUNN, Germany — The cooperation between TUXEDO Computers and the openSUSE project has existed since 2018. This has been very successful, so that the release team of openSUSE has received a permanent loan from TUXEDO Computers and has developed and further developed the new version Leap 15.1 on the InfinityBook Pro 13, which will be released soon.

The openSUSE project mainly uses the InfinityBook Pro 13 from the TUXEDO Computers range. It offers numerous configuration options and is characterized by its mobility, runtime, performance, quality and flexibility. The internal tests at openSUSE were consistently positive. Further information and benchmarks can be found in the current joint success story, which is available for download.

TUXEDO Computers at the openSUSE Conference 2019

24th to 26th of May 2019: openSUSE Conference 2019 in Nuremberg/Germany

From 24th to 26th of May 2019, TUXEDO Computers will be part of the openSUSE Conference 2019 in Nuremberg/Germany. There, the hardware manufacturer from Königsbrunn near Augsburg/Germany will present a selection of current devices. The laptops can be viewed and tested here. Via the TUXEDO Computers online shop, more than 20 devices can be configured according to individual requirements and equipped, for example, with the Linux distribution openSUSE. The openSUSE conference in May is the annual openSUSE community event that brings people from all over the world together. Organized lectures, workshops and BoF sessions provide a setting for more informal meetings and hack sessions.

Further information and ticket can be found here: https://events.opensuse.org/conferences/oSC19

Help promote openSUSE Leap 15.1!

April 30th, 2019 by

The release of openSUSE Leap 15.1 is about three weeks away. To help spread the word about the release, we have counters available at counter.opensuse.org and more artwork on https://github.com/openSUSE/artwork/. You can put these items on your social media or blog pages to make sure everybody knows that the Release is Coming!

For you blog and social media accounts

If you want to decorate your blog or website with a nice Leap 15.1 banner, grab one of these:

130×130
256×256
400×400
600×100

 

Release Counter

You can add the openSUSE 15.1 release counter to your website in various sizes by including the following html code in your blog:
<a href="http://en.opensuse.org/Portal:15.1"><img src="http://counter.opensuse.org/medium.png" border="0"/></a><br/>
“medium” is the size of the counter; it can also be “small” or “large” and we also have “wide” for a banner.

See the Countdown page on the openSUSE Wiki for more countdown information, code and tips!

Return of the Rodents: Xfce is back in openSUSE Tumbleweed Installer

April 10th, 2019 by

We are very pleased to announce that installing the lightweight and slim desktop environment Xfce in openSUSE Tumbleweed just got faster and hassle-free!

Along with GNOME and KDE Plasma, Xfce can now be conveniently selected from the installer’s main screen, as your desktop environment from both DVD installer and net installer. All this is combined with a carefully picked selection of packages that rounds off our offered system to get you started quickly and easily.

Our Xfce team has invested a lot of work in the past months to optimize the “cute mouse” by focusing on the desktop and the underlying rolling release of Tumbleweed. It features applications that better suit the desktop, as well as new modern themes that make the default experience refreshing and enjoyable.

Finally, there is a relatively new project in the Open Build Service (OBS), which builds automatically and daily development versions of Xfce software from Xfce Git Master branch. Through this repository, openSUSE Xfce packagers and contributors are able to test commits and can spot bugs before official releases.
Xfce users are welcome to test it and contribute to it at X11:xfce:rat. [1]

Going live

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Google Summer of Code 2018

December 21st, 2018 by

One more year, Google Summer of Code (GSoC), a mentoring program in which openSUSE helps university students contribute to open source project, has come to an end. So, before 2018 ends as well and we start preparing for the new edition of GSoC, it is time to speak about all the great things that happened this year. :sparkles:

GSoC 2018

Let’s start by the most important part, our students’ work. Our successful students, Ankush Malik and Liana Xu, have spent 3 months hacking on openSUSE projects, during which they have written a lot of impressive code. But GSoC is much more than code, it is about learning, having fun and becoming part of the openSUSE community. Both Ankush and Liana claim that it has been an inspiring experience and are really thankful for the support they received from their mentors.

Ankush’s improvements in the Hackweek tool are noticeable. In his last weeks of work, he focused on giving all projects the chance to be viewed and on implementing a mailer. Check the last chapter of his GSoC journey: https://medium.com/@ankushmalik631/gsoc-wrap-up-86bba25bbb6d

Liana has been working on integrating Cloud Input in ibus-libpinyin and she has learnt ton about GNOME developer libraries and functions. Read about her project from her own words in her last blog post: https://liana.hillwoodhome.net/2018/08/13/about-programming-life-during-gsoc

It is also worthwhile mentioning the great collaboration which makes me particularly proud of the openSUSE community. Thanks to the help of contributors all around the world, the blog posts about GSoC were shared, republished and translated to languages like Japanese, Spanish and Indonesian. We also had the help of the openSUSE Indonesian community to design “Thank you” mugs to send to our mentors. Look how cute they are: :cupid:

GSoC "Trhank you" mug, thanks for mentoring GSoc "Thank you" mug", made with love

Last but not least, I would like to thank our passionate mentors and admins who took out time from their busy schedules to guide the students, our motivated students for their willingness to learn and good work, Douglas DeMaio who helped with shipping packages and organization, Google and specifically its open source team not only for the program itself but also for the well organized conference, SUSE for their support (especially economically), TSP which allows our students to attend the openSUSE conference every year, the blog post translators, Pramasta Ramadha and the rest of the designers who helped with the mugs design and everybody else who made this year GSoC amazing. Because of people like you, openSUSE is much more than just software. :green_heart:

GSoC 2019

Now let’s get ready for next year to keep helping new passionate students becoming part of openSUSE! Google has already announced Google Summer of Code 2019 and openSUSE is looking for mentors and organization admins who would like to help bringing new programmers to our community. We need at least one more organization admin and several openSUSE related projects to be able to participate. The application period for organizations is open from January 15 to February 6, so if you would like to participate as an organization admin please get in touch with HernánChristian or me by January 20. For mentors, the deadline to create an issue with your project(s) in the mentoring page is January 31. If you want more information about the program and what openSUSE has been doing, check out last blog posts, our mentoring pageGoogle’s Mentor Guide and the following video:

See you next year! :wave:

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openSUSE Develops Legal Review System

November 8th, 2018 by

The open-source community has a new project designed to help Linux/GNU distributions with the legal review process of licenses.

The new project called Cavil is legal review system that is collectively beneficial not only for the  openSUSE Project, but distributions and projects that want to use it.

The project provides an add-on service for the Open Build Service.

Every OBS request for openSUSE Factory goes through a legal review process to ensure licenses are compatible. Cavil indexes these and creates a legal report for every single request. Bot comments in OBS are made through the legal-auto python script, but the entire project is much larger than the script and bots.

Sebastian Riedel and Stephan Kulow have been developing the project for two years and it has been used in production for more than a year and half. The Cavil legal review system replaces an older system and provides much more efficiency. Cavil can automatically accept more than 90 percent of all new requests based on data from previous reviews, so packages are much more streamlined into openSUSE Factory.

The project has been so efficient that two lawyers who do all the legal reviews with the system, which is also used by SUSE, had reviewed about 110,000 packages this past year. The same lawyers curated a library with 27.000 license patterns for 600 licenses and 20 license patterns for 100 of the  most common licenses that are used to create legal reports. Riedel said there is a desire hope to expand that in the future with the hope of collecting new patterns with the open-source community.

The legal Data Base used by SUSE to generate reports with new license patterns  is about 2TB and has about 68.433.436 pattern matches in 27.319.682 individual files.

Like openQA, Cavil is written in Perl, with Mojolicious/Minion and PostgreSQL.

A quick look at the statistics about the content of the legal database showed the most popular open source licenses were GPL-2.0, BSD-3-Clause, GPL-Unspecified and MIT respectively.

Marvell, TUXEDO Computers Sponsor openSUSE Project

November 6th, 2018 by

Two companies were recently added to the openSUSE Sponsors page thanks to the companies generous donations to the openSUSE Project.

Both Marvell and TUXEDO Computers have provided tangible support through donations to openSUSE to promote the use and development of Linux.

“We are thoroughly pleased to have Marvell and TUXEDO Computers as sponsors of the openSUSE Project,” said Richard Brown, chairman of the openSUSE Board. “The sponsorships support and encourage open-software development. Multiple Linux distributions and the open-source community will benefit greatly from the equipment.”

Marvell, which recently completed the acquisition of Cavium, offers a broad portfolio of infrastructure solutions. Marvell donated a ThunderX2 system to the openSUSE Project. The Dual-System-on-Chip machine with 256GB RAM and 240GB SSD will extend the existing fleet of ARM build hardware. This 64-bit ThunderX2 system will bring an additional 40 ARMv8 (AArch64) concurrent build jobs to the openSUSE Open Build Service, which can now provide its users with faster AArch64 package and installation image builds.

TUXEDO Computers makes Linux hardware, notebooks and more. The company, which offers its TUXEDO InfinityBook Pro 13 with Leap 15 preinstalled, has offered to send volunteers running openSUSE booths at conferences a TUXEDO laptop for demo purposes, which will need to be returned to TUXEDO Computers after demoing it at a conference. Volunteers who wish to demo a TUXEDO laptop at a summit, conference or other open-source technology event can request a demo laptop through a trusted person in the openSUSE. The trusted person will decide on eligibility of the volunteer on behalf of TUXEDO Computers. Contact the openSUSE Board or an openSUSE member if you are interested. TUXEDO Computers will send out the laptop and handle return shipping.

GSoC 2018 Mentor Summit

October 27th, 2018 by

David Kang and I attended two weeks ago (12-14 Oct) the Google Summer of Code (GSoC) Mentor Summit in California representing openSUSE. :sunny: Here is our report of the conference.

It was an incredibly well organized event with a busy schedule. It was our first summit (we try that different openSUSE mentors/org admins go every year) and we enjoyed it a lot and found it really useful. Apart from attending many sessions about open source, mentoring and GSoC, we had the opportunity to meet and have interesting conversations with other org admins and mentors, as well as with the Google open source team and other Googlers. In total 314 mentors and org admins from 42 countries attended the events. This was a great chance to collect chocolate from all around the world for the chocolate bar table, which has already become a tradition at the summit. :chocolate_bar:

chocolate table David and Ana in San Francisco

The summit follows the unconference format, which means that the sessions are decided and organized by the attendees. Those are the most outstanding sessions from the ones David and I attended.

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