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Krita, GNOME Builder, FFmpeg Get Updates in Tumbleweed

July 5th, 2018 by

The four openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots this week are trending quite stable as new major version packages have been updated this week.

Among the packages updates this week were FFmpeg, KDE Plasma, GNOME Builder and Krita along with a kernel update.

The most recent snapshot, 20180702, put out the first update ffmpeg 4.0 with a refresh of patches and an enablement for ffnvcodec when building with NVIDIA support. The snapshot brought about another 4.0 version with checkmedia upgrading from 3.8 to the new 4.0 version. The tools and libraries package to work with Extensible Firmware Interface variables, efivar, had a major update as well and adjusted its libefiboot-export-disk_get_partition_info.patch to work with the new 36 version. That wasn’t the last major version update either. The package for userspace components for the Linux Kernel‘s drivers/infiniband subsystem, rdma-core, updated to version 18.1; the new major version fixed compilations with recent glibc. Among the other packages in the snapshot there were updated were spec-cleaner 1.1.0, brotli 1.0.5 and System Security Services Daemon (sssd) 1.16.2.

The 20180701 snapshot brough Plasma 5.13.2. The release added a week’s worth of new translations and fixes from KDE‘s contributors. There were also updates to several YaST packages and libstorage-ng 3.3.312 removed an unused and obsolete file. Konversation 1.7.5 dropped a patch and fixed building against Qt 5.11. The lightweight image viewer for the Xfce desktop ristretto 0.8.3 had multiple fixes including a fix for GLib-GObject-CRITICAL in the directory monitoring code.

Snapshots from the end of last month included snapshot 20180629 and 20180628. Snapshot 20180629 improved the performance of the stroke layer style with an update to the open source painting program krita 4.0.4. The testsuite package spec-cleaner was updated in this snapshot as well to version 1.0.9, which dropped support of python 2, and there were bug fixes for Qt 5.11 with the libqt5-qttranslations and libqt5-qtvirtualkeyboard package updates to 5.11.1. Snapshot 20180628 updated the Linux Kernel to 4.17.3, which had multiple fixes for the btrfs filesystem and deleted some stacktrace patches. The gnome-builder package made the editor more reliable to restores a cursor position and fixed for a number of crashers and potential for data loss with the 3.28.3 update.

Packages updated in previous snapshots last month were were GCC 8.1.1, KDE Applications 18.04.2, KDE Frameworks 5.47.0 and PulseAudio 12.0. Release manager Dominique Leuenberger summarized the updates in his weekly review and also explained that even though FFmpeg 4.0 was updates, FFmpeg 3.x is still available in the main repo, but will eventually be be phased out. All the snapshots in the past few weeks have been rated as moderate to stable in the Tumbleweed review tool. Snapshot 20180702 is currently trending as stable with a 91 percent rating.

Dates, Location set for openSUSE Conference 2019

June 25th, 2018 by

The openSUSE Project is pleased to announce the location and dates for the 2019 openSUSE Conference.

The openSUSE Conference 2019 will return to the Z-Bau in Nuremberg, Germany, and be Friday, May 24, through Sunday, May 26.

Planning for the 2019 conference will begin this summer and community members are encouraged to take part in the planning of the conference through the organizing team. The openSUSE Board proposed the idea of having organizing team for openSUSE Conferences last month at oSC18. An email about the organizing team was sent out to the openSUSE-Project mailing list.

Developing the organizing team should help with the planning of future openSUSE Conferences as the project looks expand the conferences to more locations throughout Europe. Both oSC16 and oSC17 were in Nuremberg and oSC18 was in Prague, Czech Republic, last month.

Anyone who is interested in helping to organize oSC19 should email me ddemaio (@) opensuse.org.

Tumbleweed Delivers New Kernel, Applications, Plasma, libvirt

June 20th, 2018 by

The past week brought a total of three openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots and a bunch of new features and improvements for KDE users.

Snapshot 20180618 updated just a few packages to include an updated GNU Compiler Collection 7, which fixes support for 32-bit AddressSanitizer with glibc 2.27+. Both perl-File-ShareDir and python-numpy were the other two packages that gave users minor fixes.

The snapshots earlier in the week were more KDE centric. Snapshot 20180615 delivered KDE Applications 18.04.2. The updated applications focused on bugfixes, improvements and translations for Dolphin, Gwenview, KGpg, Kig, Konsole, Lokalize, Okular and many more. KGpg no longer fails to decrypt messages without a version header and image with Gwenview can now be redone after undoing them. The Linux Kernel jumped from 4.16.12 to 4.17.1 and fixed some btrfs and KVM issues. The newer kernel also ported an arm fix for HDMI output routing and fixed an atomic sequence handling with spi-nor and intel-spi. The hwinfo package tried a more aggressive way to catch all usb platform controllers with the 21.55 version. Libvirt 4.4.0 added support for migration of Virtual Machines with non-shared storage over Thread-Local Storage (TLS) and introduced a new virDomainDetachDevice Alias. Lenovo, HP and Dell tablets gaining greater support with the updated libwacom 0.30  package. Add support for PostgreSQL-style UPSERT were made available with sqlite3  3.24.0. Other tools like mercurial 4.6.1, snapper 0.5.5 were also updated in the snapshot.

Tumbleweed users started to receive the updates to KDE Applications 18.04.2 in snapshot 20180613, but the update to Plasma 5.13 was what caught most users’ attention. The KDE Community spent a considerable amount of time optimising the startup and minimising memory usage, which provided a faster time-to-desktop and better runtime performance while using less memory consumption. Plasma 5.13 has a new system settings redesign, a new look and more features with its software and addon installer Discover. Two other notable changes in the 20180613 snapshot were updates to ceph 13.2, which fixed python3 loading module, and an update of the head branch to GCC8. Mesa 18.1.1 and perl-Image-ExifTool 11.00 were also updated in the snapshot.

openSUSE Releases Leap 15 Images for Raspberry Pi, Armv7 Devices

June 14th, 2018 by

The release of openSUSE Leap 15 two weeks ago is following up with its Build to Scale theme by offering images for Raspberry Pis, Beagle Boards, Arndale board, CuBox-i computers, OLinuXino and more.

openSUSE has plenty of supported arm boards to allow makers to simply create. openSUSE is providing makers the tools to start, run and grow a project on micro devices to large hardware.

The new, fresh and hardened code base that supports modern hardware is stable and offers a full scope of deployments.

Makers can leverage openSUSE Leap 15 images for aarch64 and Armv7 on Internet of Things (IoT) and embedded devices. Since openSUSE Leap 15 shares a common core  SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 15 sources, makers who find success with a project or device can more comfortably transition to an enterprise product in the future should certifications become a requirement. Currently, the only IoT platform supported by SLE is the Raspberry Pi 3. However, there is no current supported migration from Leap 15 to SLE 15 with the Raspberry Pi. The barrier to entry in the IoT/embedded markets are lowered when a developer starts a project with Leap 15. Plus, the many supported arm boards can help developers circumnavigate future obstacles that might hinder project’s growth in a developing market.

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GSoC Blog: openSUSE Conference 2018

June 6th, 2018 by

Embedded below is the blog of Google Summer of Code student Matheus de Sousa Bernardo. Matheus is assisting with improving API and workflow of Trollolo, which is a cli-tool that helps teams using Trello to organize their work, as part of his Google Summer of Code project.

openSUSE.Asia Summit 2018 Logo Competition

May 29th, 2018 by

Today, we will start a logo competition for openSUSE.Asia Summit 2018, which is going to be held in Taipei, Taiwan. A logo is an essential material for the successful summit. As you have seen, the former openSUSE.Asia summits have their unique logos reflecting the communities where the summit took place. Following tradition, we have logo competition to collect great logo for this year’s summit.

The competition is open now and ends on 30 June 2018. The organizing team will send “Geeko Mystery Box” as an appreciation for the best logo designed.

Deadline: 30 June 2018 UTC 13:00

Review Design:   1 – 2 July 2018

Voting period: 3 – 10 July 2018

Announcement Winner: 11 July 2018

The Rules of the Contest are as follows:

  • The logo should be licensed under CC-BY-SA 4.0 and allow everyone to use the logo without attribution (BY) if your work is used as the logo of openSUSE.Asia Summit 2018. Note that the attribution is going to be shown on the summit website.
  • Design must be original and should not include any third party materials conflicting with CC-BY-SA 4.0 with the attribution exception.
  • Both monochromes and color formats are essential for submission.
  • Submissions must be in SVG format.
  • Design should reflect the openSUSE community in Asia.
  • The logo should avoid the following things:
    • Brand names or trademarks of any kind.
    • Illustrations that may consider inappropriate, offensive, hateful, tortuous, defamatory, slanderous or libelous.
    • Sexually explicit or provocative images.
    • Violence or weapons.
    • Alcohol, tobacco, or drug use imagery.
    • Discrimination based on race, gender, religion, nationality, disability, sexual orientation or age.
    • Bigotry, racism, hatred or harm against groups or individuals
    • Religious, political, or nationalist imagery.
  • The logo should follow “openSUSE Project Trademark Guidelines” published at https://en.opensuse.org/File:OpenSUSE_Trademark_Guidelines.pdf
  • The branding guidelines will be helpful to design your logo (optional)
    https://opensuse.github.io/branding-guidelines/

Please submit your design to opensuseasia-summit@googlegroups.com with the following entries: (more…)

openSUSE Donates 10 More Raspberry Pis to GNU Health

May 26th, 2018 by

The openSUSE Project once again donated 10 Raspberry Pis to GNU Health Project, which were handed over to the project’s founder Luis Falcon at the openSUSE Conference today.

Last year, the openSUSE Project donated 10 Raspberry Pis to the non-profit, non-government organizations (NGO) that delivers free open-source software for health practitioners, health institutions and governments worldwide.

The affordable ARM hardware that was donated last year were distributed to Italy, India, Cameroon, Germany, Spain and Argentina to improve healthcare management and patient care. Some were also used to improve development on the platform.

GNU Health’s free software provides functionality to facilitate a Hospital Information System (HIS),  Health Information System and Electronic Medical Record (EMR) management.

Both Falcon and Axel Braun gave talks at the openSUSE Conference about GNU Health and how it is changing digital ecosystem and benefiting communities on a global scale.

More talks about GNU Health and its Raspberry Pis are expected to be discussed at the GNU Health Conference in November, which openSUSE is sponsoring this year.

Users of openSUSE can install GNU Health as part of the official release of openSUSE Leap 15 at software.opensuse.org.

Uyuni: Forking Spacewalk with Salt and Containers

May 26th, 2018 by

PRAGUE, Czech Republic – Members of a new open source community project called Uyuni announced today at openSUSE Conference that a fork of the open-source systems management solution Spacewalk is on its way.

The intention of the fork is to give new inspiration to a project that has been perceived as idling in recent years. Uyuni, however is already looking at increasing the implementation of a React web User Interface, translations, clients, container and Kubernetes integration. Uyuni is using Salt for configuration management, thereby inheriting its name: Uyuni refers to the world’s largest Salt flat, Salar de Uyuni in Southwest Bolivia.

Compatible and Innovative

“Uyuni has a vision for this open-source code and plans on growing its community and innovating the code beyond its current state in Spacewalk,” said Klaus Kämpf, SUSE’s Project Owner of SUSE Manager, who announced the fork. “Contributions for Spacewalk have decreased and focused more on maintenance and stabilization than on innovation.”

Uyuni will stay compatible, Kämpf adds as much as possible: “The Uyuni project will not break up compatibility on purpose, but that shall not prevent improvements for that reason.”

The current development plans are releasing a first version this summer, and then deciding on a release model together with the community.

Development will have automated testing using both the Open Build Service and Cluster Infrastructure.

A New Vision Sparking Contributions

Results from GitHub show the frequency of contributions have dwindled since 2014 and the current Spacewalk faq website states “Red Hat’s code contributions will decrease over time, as the focus shifts to maintenance and stabilization of the current set of features.”

A fact listed from the previous Spacewalk FAQ website, which has since been removed, stated, “As Red Hat’s participation ramps down, there will be an opportunity for the participation from other community members to ramp up. Someone (or several someones!) will need to take over some of the management role that currently rests on Red Hat.”

Uyuni community members decided to fork the project after extensive discussions with Red Hat about taking over the management role as stated above.

Spacewalk is an open source Linux systems management solution, currently available in version 2.8 as upstream community project for Red Hat Satellite 5. SUSE Manager is also based on Spacewalk and now plans on shifting to Uyuni as an upstream community.

“SUSE Manager’s development will be openly available to open-source community members for whatever contributions they would like to make to the Uyuni project,” Kämpf said.

Interested members can follow the project on https://github.com/uyuni-project, www.uyuni-project.org, or via Twitter at @UyuniProject. A presentation about Uyuni can be viewed on the openSUSETV YouTube channel or via the live stream for the conference at 9:30 a.m. UTC on https://streaming.media.ccc.de/osc18/.

Based on Enterprise Code, Tested Millions of Times: openSUSE Leap 15 released

May 25th, 2018 by

EN, CA, CZ, DE, ES, JA, PL, PT-BR, ZH, ZH-TW

Fresh community build on top of SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 brings huge variety of newest software, easy migration to SLE, transactional updates, server roles, scalable cloud images and Linux laptops

Today’s major release of openSUSE Leap 15 is offering professional users, entrepreneurs and ISVs (Independent Software Vendors) a new, fresh and hardened code base for their workloads that supports modern hardware, based on a stable, community- and enterprise-based open-source GNU/Linux distribution – but developed with a modern, more secure, better tested and much more open open-source build system unique to SUSE and openSUSE.

New Features

openSUSE Leap 15 now allows migration to SLE, brings a new partitioner, integrates the Groupware Kopano, moves to Firewalld – and also comes distributed by Linode (for Cloud and infrastructure setups) and on high-end hardware like Tuxedo Laptops (other Cloud and hardware vendors will follow). On top of that, Leap 15 introduces a system role selection with classic “server” or “transactional server” role with transactional updates and a read-only root file system. This brings in all the benefits of atomic updates to the full scope of deployments, from the Internet of Things (IoT) and embedded devices to classical server and desktop roles. Apart from that, Leap 15 has been continually optimized for cloud usage scenarios as virtualization guest and at the same time offers a great variety of desktops, including KDE and GNOME and features the return of Live images for simple test-driving.

New Look, closely aligned with SLE

With a brand new look developed by the community, openSUSE Leap 15 brings plenty of community packages built on top of a core from SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 15 sources, with the two major releases being built in parallel from the beginning for the first time. Leap 15 shares a common core with SLE 15, which is due for release in the coming months. The first release of Leap was version 42.1, and it was based on the first Service Pack (SP1) of SLE 12. Three years later SUSE’s enterprise version and openSUSE’s community version are now aligned at 15 with a fresh rebase.

“Having a community distribution that shares a common DNA with enterprise is the smart way to interact with the open-source ecosystem,” said Kai Dupke, long-time openSUSE user and senior product manager for SUSE Linux Enterprise 15. “Leap provides great flexibility and freedom of choice for developers and users.”

Migration to Enterprise made easy

Consequently, for the first time, SUSE will support migration from openSUSE Leap server installations to SUSE Linux Enterprise, which makes it easy for system integrators to develop on Leap code and later move to an enterprise version for SLAs, certification, mass deployment, or extended Long Term Support.

“Upgrading to a commercial product can be complex for developers wanting to migrate a solution from a community Linux distribution to an enterprise distribution”, Dupke explains. “With Leap 15 SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 15, that journey is made easy. We know that the community is where the innovations happen, and Leap community developers now can easily broaden that scope into enterprise Linux, if needed. Leap 15 is offering the quickest and most flexible transition to enterprise service, support and maintenance.”

OBS, OpenQA: Better Tested, More Secure and More Open than Others

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Have a Release Party, Promote openSUSE’s Newest Version

May 16th, 2018 by

There are just 9 days left for the release of openSUSE Leap 15 and the community can help spread the word of the release by having a release party and promoting the newest version of Leap.

Thanks to hellcp people can decorate their blogs and website with the openSUSE Leap 15 counter:

      

A list of social media posts are listed on the wiki and members of the community are encouraged to translate and post the translated posts in their local language on social media.

Many members of the community will be at the openSUSE Conference for the release/after party but the parties can continue with your own Release Party. If you don’t know how to do this, there is a list of five steps to have a successful release party. Plus more details are listed below on how to have a fantastic party.

Selecting a good date and having some goodies to pass out to the party requires a bit of planning. The checklist below can help with planning the release party. If you plan on having a party, email ddemaio (at) opensuse.org well before the party to get some goodies to hand out to the party people. Please include “Leap 15 Party” in the subject line and include a mailing address and phone number.

Notify the community of your release party by listing your party on the launch party wiki page.

checklist:

Find a date

The date of a party is best during a weekend (because it’s easier for people to join, since most people work during the week), but we all function differently. Find two alternative dates for the party if you want and use http://www.doodle.com/ to find a common date that works for most people.

Find a place

A cafe, bar or Linux group meetup location are all great places to have an event. A coffee and cake release party is just as fun as a beer and pizza release party.

Cake

It is not necessary to have a cake, but it sure is a lot of fun. You can also have openSUSE Cookies. On the Launch Party wiki page, there are two Release Parties list so far. One release party is in Nuremberg, Germany, on August 3 starting at 4 p.m. The other party is listed for FrOSCon and both will have a cake.

Pictures, pictures, pictures

Bring one or more cameras to take pictures or videos and post them to social media. Tag openSUSE on the photos you post on Twitter, Google +, Facebook or Diaspora.

Swag

PromoDVDs, webcam covers and stickers – If we can get it to you without too much red tape from governments, we will; just email ddemaio (at) opensuse.org with Release Party.

IMPORTANT TIP: Schedule your release party on the wiki and have a lot of fun!