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Special Edition Highlights openSUSE, KDE

October 11th, 2017 by

Getting the masses to move to a Linux distribution can be challenging, but the openSUSE Project is doing its part to get people started with open-source software.

Members of the openSUSE community recently worked with Linux Magazine to publish a special edition of a Getting Started With Linux magazine with the purpose of increasing the openSUSE user base and teaching beginners how to make the switch to Linux.

The 100-page special edition focuses on installing openSUSE Leap 42.3, using the installation and configuration tool YaST, understanding security and many other topics specific for Linux beginners.

It also provides a crash course on Linux and goes in depth about the several applications available on Linux distributions and openSUSE’s default desktop selection, which currently is KDE’s Long Term Support version Plasma 5.8. Many of the articles written in the magazine are from community members of both openSUSE and KDE among others.

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Hack Week Announced for Mid-November

October 9th, 2017 by

Hack Week 0x10 will be Nov. 10 – 16 at many of the SUSE Research and Development locations and developers and hackers from the community are welcomed to participate.

Hack Week is a week-long event where members of the openSUSE community, along with other communities, get a chance to investigate interesting technologies and get involved in promising new or existing projects.

The event focuses not only on building and expanding technology, but brings people with similar interests together to hack for fun. There are several successful stories that have come from previous Hack Weeks like  Jangouts, which is open-source video conferencing software.

The planning of the projects for Hack Week 0x10 can be created on http://hackweek.suse.com. Hackers who want to participate can also join existing projects. One example of a project that has already be created putting openSUSE on Chromebooks.

Visitors must be logged in to the website to create and join projects. To join the event at one of the locations, email hackweek@suse.de to be connected to a site manager at an SUSE R&D facility.

To learn more about Hack Week 0x10, visit https://hackweek.suse.com/about.

Tumbleweed Goes Astronomical

October 5th, 2017 by

Astronomers using openSUSE Tumbleweed received some major software enhancements in a snapshot this week and the four snapshots released also addressed some architecture issues and critical bug fixes.

The snapshots also brought new versions of the Linux Kernel, git, GNU Compiler Collection and mpg123.

The most recent snapshot to be released, snapshot 20171001, provided an update to the programming tool binutils 2.29.1. An update of the branch head of GNU Compiler Collection 7 disabled a patch to verify a test case. The network authentication protocol krb5 1.15.2 fixed a Key Distribution Center (KDC) Denial of Service (DoS) vulnerability caused by unset status strings; Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE-2017-11368).

Snapshot 20170929 updated ImageMagick 7.0.7.4 and fixed numerous memory leaks. The Linux Kernel was updated to version 4.13.4 and made several changes, which included fixes for PowerPC and S390. The KBD Project, which offers the package that helps with managing the Linux console, virtual terminals, keyboards and more, received an update to kbd 2.0.4. Git 2.14.2 provided various fixes for output correctness. An updated version of the Router Advertisement Daemon to radvd 2.17 added systemd service file. Several bugs were fixed with the update of php7 7.1.10 including bug 75093 that affected curl detection for OpenSSL, which was not detected. A proper fix for the xrpnt overflow problems were made for the MPEG Audio Player and decoder library mpg123 with version 1.25.7.

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SUSE Studio online + Open Build Service = SUSE Studio Express

October 4th, 2017 by

Merging SUSE Studio and Open Build Service

Written by Andreas Jaeger

SUSE Studio was launched in 2009 to make building images really easy. Nowadays, images are used everywhere – for public cloud you need images; container images are used to have small and movable workloads, and data center operators use golden images to start their workloads.

As you may be aware, we have an Open Build Service (OBS) tool that helps you to build packages to deliver complete distributions. In the last few years, we have been updating this tool and it now can handle any kind of image.

Additionally, the default engine for building images at SUSE is kiwi and is used in both SUSE Studio and OBS.

Reviewing these offerings and the way the image build situation has evolved, we have decided to merge the two online services, OBS and SUSE Studio, into a common solution.

Looking at the feature requests for SUSE Studio on image building and looking at our technologies, we decided to use OBS as the base for our image building service. Since OBS already builds images for various environments, we will first add a new image building GUI to OBS. This combined solution will now be delivered as “SUSE Studio Express”.

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Planned Downtime to Affect openSUSE Services

October 4th, 2017 by

A scheduled power outage in the Nuremberg office will effect a number of openSUSE services from Oct. 13 at 4 p.m. (16:00 UTC) to Oct. 14  at 4 p.m. (16:00 UTC).

The scheduled maintenance on the building’s electricity will affect most services. The only services that will be normally operating are:
status.opensuse.org
download.opensuse.org
static.opensuse.org
conncheck.opensuse.org

The rest of the services will be fully online on Oct. 15. The Heroes team will try to keep you updated on the situation, and will also send a few reminders (on the opensuse-announce mailing list) before the incident.

Due to technical constraints, the above services will not be available through IPv6 during the outage.

Thank you for your understanding.
On behalf of the openSUSE Heroes Team and the SUSE-IT team.

New Repository Caters to Tumbleweed’s Nvidia Users

September 20th, 2017 by

Using Nvidia drivers on openSUSE Tumbleweed in the past was cumbersome and fragile when it came to regular snapshot updates.

Often users needed to uninstall the NVIDIA’s userspace driver (like libGL, Xserver glx library, etc.) before updating to the latest Tumbleweed snapshot and reinstall the NVIDIA’s userspace driver afterward. Otherwise users may have ended up in a mess with Mesa overwriting NVIDIA’s userspace drivers.

In addition with every kernel update, users needed to recompile the kernel module due to possible Kernel Application Binary Interface (kABI) changes in a new Linux kernel. The easiest way to achieve this was to completely uninstall NVIDIA’s driver (“nvidia-installer –uninstall”) and reinstall it after the Tumbleweed update.

Now, openSUSE Tumbleweed users have a better solution.

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Are Governments Held Hostage? Why openSUSE Supports Public Money Public Code

September 13th, 2017 by

Public Money? Public Code! from Free Software Foundation Europe on Vimeo.

Europeans can disagree on political issues, but there is one issue the open-source community is bringing to the political spectrum that many citizens can find agreement about; publicly funded software has to be Free and Open Source Software.

“Public institutions spend millions of euros each year on the development of new software tailored to their needs,” according to a release from the non-profit advocacy group Free Software Foundation Europe. “The procurement choices of the public sector play a significant role in determining which companies are allowed to compete and what software is supported with tax payers’ money.

To bring awareness to this issue, FSFE started the “Public Money Public Code” campaign at https://publiccode.eu, which was originally revealed by Matthias Kirschner during the keynote at the openSUSE Conference, and the openSUSE Project encourages all its members and open source enthusiasts to sign the open letter addressed to European politicians about this important public issue. This can also be achieved with the sharing of videos on the topic.

There are many reasons for why code of publicly-funded software projects should be freely available for people to study, develop, enhance and use.

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Catching up with Tumbleweed Snapshots

August 24th, 2017 by

The last review readers received about openSUSE Tumbleweed was a while ago, so it’s time to catch up on the new packages available for the rolling release.

Release manager Dominique Leuenberger gave subscribers of the openSUSE Factory Mailing List a nice review of 11 snapshots from July 28 to August 16 in his Review of the weeks 2017/31 – 33 email.

In the email, Leuenberger lists LibreOffice 5.4.0.3, KDE Applications 17.04.3, git 2.14.0 and systemd 234 as all being available in the Tumbleweed repositories. PulseAudio 11 RC1 and Mozilla Firefox 52.3.0 also were updated in the snapshots between the same period.

Flatpak was reverted to the 0.8.x branch in order to provide better upgrade options in short term,” he wrote in the email.

There have been considerable challenges getting the 4.12 Linux Kernel in Tumbleweed, but Kernel 4.12.7 finally made it into Tumbleweed’s 20170817 snapshot and Kernel 4.12.8 passed openQA testing to finds its way into the  20170819 snapshot a couple days later.

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openSUSE Leap 42.3 Cloud Images Become Available

August 22nd, 2017 by

Cloud images for openSUSE Leap 42.3 are now available for Azure, Google Compute Engine and more cloud providers.

The images for Amazon Web Services (AWS EC2) are expected to arrive soon as they were recently submitted for review by the AWS Marketplace team.

“Compared to openSUSE Leap 42.2 we were in much better shape releasing two of three images on release date (GCE and Azure) and even the delayed image was released much closer to release date than the 42.2 release,” Robert Schweikert wrote on Google Plus.

End users can choose the cloud service provider that best fits their usage model.

Leap ships with tools for uploading and managing images. The tools allow for uploading, publishing, deleting and deprecating images.

There are a couple of known things not working at the moment like the “gcloud” command in the GCE image and the automatic hostname setting in the GCE image,

Both will be worked on as time permits, Schweikert wrote.

Cloud images of openSUSE have been available in for years and users can run Docker containers in a Virtual Machine with openSUSE’s cloud image; this has been tested with SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12, which shares a common core with openSUSE Leap.

Since releasing openSUSE Leap 42.2 in the AWS Marketplace, around mid January, roughly 220 subscribers are running openSUSE Leap. AWS customers have an opportunity to use openSUSE’s community software on AWS without any hourly-software instance charge.